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BioPharma Asia Magazine

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  • Process analytical Technology for Upstream Bioprocessing
    Process analytical Technology for Upstream Bioprocessing Erica Fratz-Berilla & LCDR Agarabi Recorded: Mar 5 2018 71 mins
    In commercial cell culture bioprocessing, consistent high quality protein is a fundamental goal that is typically accomplished during development through product and process engineering of bioreactor parameters. The FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER)’s Office of Biotechnology Products’ upstream bioprocessing laboratory, a part of the Office of Pharmaceutical Quality’s Center of Excellence (COE) in Manufacturing Science and Innovation, studies Process Analytical Technology (PAT) for upstream bioprocessing, focusing on the production of monoclonal antibodies. These capabilities are being leveraged to study continuous bioreactor cell culture production and compatible PAT tools. Case studies are presented that illustrate collaborative laboratory research being conducted on PAT tools for upstream bioprocessing to support regulatory decision making.
  • Efficient execution of biologics manufacturing – The role of Finite Scheduling
    Efficient execution of biologics manufacturing – The role of Finite Scheduling Gloria Gadea-Lopez, Ph.D., John Maguire and Megan Rabideau Recorded: Feb 14 2018 47 mins
    The success of manufacturing relies on the availability of all the resources –personnel, materials, equipment, work instructions - , orchestrated in such a way that the operations proceed in an efficient and predictable manner. This article describes the implementation of a finite scheduling system for biologics production, the foundational work required prior to project launch, lessons learned, and benefits achieved from this deployment.
  • Disposables – Suitability and Process Economy In Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing
    Disposables – Suitability and Process Economy In Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing Dr Joachim Walter Recorded: Feb 8 2018 38 mins
    Since the introduction of disposables and gaining popularity of Single-use Technology (SUT) for biopharmaceutical manufacturing there is nevertheless an ongoing controversial discussion on the advantages and disadvantages versus a conventional stainless steel environment.

    In a “classical” facility design any validation cost effort can easily be distributed to a considerable number of production runs thus contributing only to a non-decisive amount to the overall production costs. The scale for such plant is nearly unlimited as is the scale of operation. The “flexible” approach using disposables and single-use equipment offers significant advantages regarding changeover work and time thus a high throughput of different processes will definitely take profit as any cleaning and related validation and costly analytics doesn’t apply to a larger extent.

    Despite the potential benefits loudly advertised by the respective industry, these potential advantages derived from single-use equipment and disposables can be significantly diminished by lack of detailed process cost analysis, missing economic analysis and cost comparison between conventional and SU technologies as well as underestimating the cost of long term dependency on consumables. Due to missing appropriate standards, there is a widely non-compatibility between the equipment and consumables of the various suppliers, resulting in a strong dependence on the consumables of a single supplier once a single-use equipment has been purchased, curiously leaving some customers with surprise that they hardly have any room for price negotiations on the required consumables.
    This paper’s focus is on the very different arguments for the application of SU equipment and consumables, including advantages and limitations of SUT, understanding improvement of process robustness, contribution to lean production as well as environmental impact of disposables.
  • Do Extractable Protocols Truly Help- An End User Perspective
    Do Extractable Protocols Truly Help- An End User Perspective Ekta Mahajan, Genentech/Roche Recorded: Feb 5 2018 66 mins
    Single Use technology is being used more each year in the biotechnology industry. However, extractables and their potential impact on product and patients continue to be one of the biggest challenges. The challenge is augmented by the lack of standardized methodology for suppliers to execute extractable studies that meets end user requirements. The end users are responsible and required by law to assess the impact of extractables and leachables on overall Product Quality and Safety. Due to lack of a standard, customized data had to be generated for/by each end users. This resulted in long lead times, higher costs and inefficient utilization of resources. Typically, the data generation and qualification of single use component can take up to a year, which can impact implementation of single use. BioPhorum Operations Group (BPOG) developed a standardized protocol9 for generating extractable data that would meet user requirements and simplify/reduce implementation time within industry. A standardized protocol gives confidence to suppliers that testing performed by them would meet end user requirements and enable faster implementation. Some suppliers shared the BPOG vision and proactively tested their single use components using BPOG protocol, which has helped expedite the use of their products.
  • Enabling comprehensive data analytics and process monitoring in Biomanufacturing
    Enabling comprehensive data analytics and process monitoring in Biomanufacturing Robert Dimitri and Gloria Gadea-Lopez, Ph. D Recorded: Jan 17 2018 48 mins
    Technical teams rely on the availability of meaningful data and effective tools to perform process monitoring, to conduct root cause analysis and investigations and, most of all, to obtain new insights into their operations. In this article, the authors discuss the implementation and management of a comprehensive system for data analytics at Shire –Lexington, MA site, the lessons learned, and practical advice towards the successful deployment of these key applications.
  • Current and future applications of Near-infrared in Pharmaceutical and Biopharma
    Current and future applications of Near-infrared in Pharmaceutical and Biopharma Dr Erik Skibsted 7 Dr Fabien Chauchard Recorded: Jan 10 2018 68 mins
    Near-infrared has a long tradition as analytical technology in pharmaceutical industry. In this article/webinar new applications, technology and improvements in regulatory guidances will be presented which will support further growth of nearinfrared in the pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical industry.
  • Can the New generation of perfusion technology compete or replace the convention
    Can the New generation of perfusion technology compete or replace the convention Ankur Bhatnagar & John Bonham-Carter Recorded: Nov 15 2017 76 mins
    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the field of continuous processing. Some key factors driving this interest are – availability of better cell retention devices, improved cell lines and culture medium capable of supporting high cell densities.

    These factors have contributed mainly in reducing the batch duration for making the required quantity of product, thus reducing the medium requirement and chances of batch failures significantly. With the continuous processing being considered as ‘back-in-the-game’, the question remains: Can the current perfusion technology compete or replace the conventional and widely preferred fed-batch technology?

    Two cases are discussed to compare the performance features of fed-batch and perfusion processes. In both the cases, the product output from perfusion process is significantly higher (2 to 5 folds) than that from fed-batch, due to combination of factors like higher cell density, higher cell specific productivity, lower accumulation of toxic metabolites etc. These cases demonstrate the potential of perfusion process in significantly increasing the product output. However, there are certain challenges and points to be considered before a company decides to switch to a perfusion platform. Some of these are highlighted in the article.
  • Single-Use & Stainless Steel BioReactors: Quality Factors for Consideration
    Single-Use & Stainless Steel BioReactors: Quality Factors for Consideration Dr Trevor Deeks, Principal and Consultant of Deeks Pharmaceutical Consulting Services, LLC Recorded: Nov 8 2017 76 mins
    Single-use (SU) systems are now in common use in pharmaceutical bioprocessing, as well as in other related technologies such as the manufacture of diagnostics and other biological products, and their popularity is increasing. Some types of SU systems have been in use for many decades now. The earliest SU systems being disposable filter cartridges that do not require a stainless steel (SS) filter housing. This present article seeks to focus in particular on SU bioreactors for cell culture and bacterial fermentation for the purpose of producing therapeutic proteins, monoclonal antibodies and vaccines. SU bioreactors are of particular value in early phase (Clinical Phases 1 and 2) GMP manufacturing. In some cases their use has now stretched through into commercial processing, albeit that the scale of operation is currently limited and in general the largest commercially available SU bioreactors are around 2000L working volume (WV). However, the small footprint that they require, and the reduction in investment needed for support services and utilities, means that the scale limitations can be overcome to a significant degree by having multiple SU bioreactors operating in parallel within a facility. The harvest from multiple bioreactors can be pooled for downstream processing, or each harvest can be processed as a separate batch, based upon considerations of the risks versus the economies of pooling.

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