Hi [[ session.user.profile.firstName ]]

BioPharma Asia Magazine

  • Date
  • Rating
  • Views
  • Can the New generation of perfusion technology compete or replace the convention
    Can the New generation of perfusion technology compete or replace the convention Ankur Bhatnagar & John Bonham-Carter Recorded: Nov 15 2017 76 mins
    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the field of continuous processing. Some key factors driving this interest are – availability of better cell retention devices, improved cell lines and culture medium capable of supporting high cell densities.

    These factors have contributed mainly in reducing the batch duration for making the required quantity of product, thus reducing the medium requirement and chances of batch failures significantly. With the continuous processing being considered as ‘back-in-the-game’, the question remains: Can the current perfusion technology compete or replace the conventional and widely preferred fed-batch technology?

    Two cases are discussed to compare the performance features of fed-batch and perfusion processes. In both the cases, the product output from perfusion process is significantly higher (2 to 5 folds) than that from fed-batch, due to combination of factors like higher cell density, higher cell specific productivity, lower accumulation of toxic metabolites etc. These cases demonstrate the potential of perfusion process in significantly increasing the product output. However, there are certain challenges and points to be considered before a company decides to switch to a perfusion platform. Some of these are highlighted in the article.
  • Single-Use & Stainless Steel BioReactors: Quality Factors for Consideration
    Single-Use & Stainless Steel BioReactors: Quality Factors for Consideration Dr Trevor Deeks, Principal and Consultant of Deeks Pharmaceutical Consulting Services, LLC Recorded: Nov 8 2017 76 mins
    Single-use (SU) systems are now in common use in pharmaceutical bioprocessing, as well as in other related technologies such as the manufacture of diagnostics and other biological products, and their popularity is increasing. Some types of SU systems have been in use for many decades now. The earliest SU systems being disposable filter cartridges that do not require a stainless steel (SS) filter housing. This present article seeks to focus in particular on SU bioreactors for cell culture and bacterial fermentation for the purpose of producing therapeutic proteins, monoclonal antibodies and vaccines. SU bioreactors are of particular value in early phase (Clinical Phases 1 and 2) GMP manufacturing. In some cases their use has now stretched through into commercial processing, albeit that the scale of operation is currently limited and in general the largest commercially available SU bioreactors are around 2000L working volume (WV). However, the small footprint that they require, and the reduction in investment needed for support services and utilities, means that the scale limitations can be overcome to a significant degree by having multiple SU bioreactors operating in parallel within a facility. The harvest from multiple bioreactors can be pooled for downstream processing, or each harvest can be processed as a separate batch, based upon considerations of the risks versus the economies of pooling.
  • Characterisation of Host-Cell Proteins using Mass Spectrometry Enables Effective
    Characterisation of Host-Cell Proteins using Mass Spectrometry Enables Effective Dr Li Zang, Dr Chongfeng Xu and Dr Stephen Tate Recorded: Oct 31 2017 60 mins
    Common mammalian cell lines used for biopharmaceutical production include Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), NS0 and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells. Each of these cell lines has been found with over 20,000 genes coded in their genome, which can result in over 10,000 proteins expressed at the same time in these cells. These proteins can be secreted from the living host cells or released to the cell culture supernatant upon lysis of the host cells during the cell culture. Biopharmaceuticals produced using these cell lines can be co-purified with a subset of the host-cell proteins (HCPs) in the cell culture supernatant.

    These co-purified HCPs are considered process-related impurities for biopharmaceuticals. The HCPs can cause potential safety risks by introducing anti-HCP response in the patients. Depending on the biological functions of the residual HCPs, other potential impacts reported include lowering the biopharmaceutical protein stability and affecting the efficacy of the biopharmaceutical protein by exacerbating the symptoms.
  • The Future of Pharmaceutical Manufacturing: Flexibility and Sustainability throu
    The Future of Pharmaceutical Manufacturing: Flexibility and Sustainability throu Daniel O. Blackwood & Jeffrey Moriarty of Pfizer, Inc. Recorded: Oct 10 2017 68 mins
    Following a decade (or more) of concerted effort by industry, regulator, and academic groups, recent technology investments are now beginning to shape how medicines are being developed and manufactured for the global marketplace. While significant focus has highlighted the emergence of continuous manufacturing processes, three additional trends have also influenced and served as underlying drivers for these technology investments. First, the emergence of scientific advances in targeted biology has created high-value personalized medicines with smaller manufacturing volumes (doses/annum). Second, new regulatory pathways, such as the FDA’s Breakthrough Therapy designation, have accelerated the development and commercialization timelines for these new medicines. Finally, manufacturing localization has extended supply chain networks to serve globally-distributed patient populations throughout the world. Together, these drivers have served to shape the future of pharmaceutical development, manufacturing, and distribution of a variety of different dosage forms. The increasing need for product development speed and commercial supply flexibility through small-footprint, modular equipment trains will be highlighted within this paper, using an immediate-release solid oral dosage form example.
  • Advances in Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis and Bioanalysis of Antibody-Drug
    Advances in Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis and Bioanalysis of Antibody-Drug Arnaud Delobel, PhD Recorded: Sep 12 2017 34 mins
    ADCs are complex compounds resulting from the coupling of cytotoxic small molecules to a monoclonal antibody. Their characterization as well as their bioanalysis (quantification in biological fluids) remains challenging. Mass spectrometry at different levels (intact, middle, peptide) can be a valuable tool, and can now be used in a regulated environment thanks to advances in both hardware and software.
  • New Paradigm of Building Quality during Manufacture - Challenges with Biologics
    New Paradigm of Building Quality during Manufacture - Challenges with Biologics Dr Rajesh K. Gupta Recorded: Aug 23 2017 75 mins
    Historically, quality of biological products has been ensured through testing representative samples. Shift in quality paradigm started with implementation of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) regulations with current focus on building quality during manufacture. Inherent variability and complexity of biological products pose challenges in implementing Quality by design (QbD) concept. This presentation discusses ways to build quality during manufacture of biological products.
  • Modernizing Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing: From Batch to Continuous Production
    Modernizing Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing: From Batch to Continuous Production Dr Robert Dream & Dr Peter Levison Recorded: Jul 19 2017 66 mins
    The importance and value of continuous bioprocessing, both upstream and downstream has economic and sustainability advantages and due to the modular nature of continuous bioprocesses means that industry is able to adapt more rapidly to changing market demands. Continuous biopharmaceutical manufacturing in the context of other industries that have already successfully adopted continuous processing. Factor other than scientific ones, are the barriers to change from batch to continuous production. an excellent example of the manufacturing strategies of the steel industry in the 20th century, when this industrial sector incrementally switched from batch to continuous operations. biopharmaceutical industry has reached a stage that requires a change in the production paradigm. For a certain class of biopharmaceutical products upstream continuous manufacturing has always been applied: for example, unstable proteins that rapidly degrade in the culture broth. In order to obtain a high quality product, the residence time in the reactor must be minimized. This can only be achieved with continuous cultivation and preferably with perfusion reactors. a brief overview on the types of cell retention devices currently used in biopharmaceutical industry.
    Furthermore, this is a universal production platform that can be extended to other classes of products, such as antibodies, which are relatively stable molecules. continuous manufacturing is as productive and with a much smaller footprint of the manufacturing plant, avoiding multiple non-value added unit operations. In essence, the investment for a continuous plant is much smaller compared to a batch-operated one.
  • Implementing Single-Use PAT at seed stage to simplify cell culture operations
    Implementing Single-Use PAT at seed stage to simplify cell culture operations Dr Jose R. Vallejos Recorded: May 24 2017 35 mins
    Single-Use Process Analytical Technologies (PAT) tools have a great potential to not only increase process understanding at the seed stage but also simplify cell culture operations. By utilizing PAT, the risk from bioburden or contamination can be significantly reduced and the overall operating efficiency increased. In fact, PAT also provides a data-driven platform to integrate Process Development and Manufacturing Operations that can mitigate risks associated with technology/process transfer.
  • Developing Practical Single-Use Processes for New Vaccine Formulations
    Developing Practical Single-Use Processes for New Vaccine Formulations Kirsten Strahlendorf Recorded: May 16 2017 76 mins
    New vaccine process designs – and all the kinks that go with them – are typically hammered out in a small scale capacity, for example, prior to manufacturing for early phase human clinical trials. They are then upsized and further defined for industrial scale to supply the vast market. Single-use technologies (SUTs) have been a hot topic for several years now and their advantages well-known: easy product changeover, processing in lower classification areas, reduced CAPEX, elimination of glass, sterility assurance, to name a few. In vaccine manufacturing, SUTs are used throughout the processing stages, from cell culture all the way to filling. SUTs are quickly and conveniently designed, purchased and implemented for short-term manufacturing of clinical trial phase materials. Here a large percentage of new vaccines in Research and Development do not even make it to market.

    As the final production stages are critical as they are the last stages before patient injection, the scope of thisarticle covers SU applications involving drug substance formulations, adjuvant processing, final bulk formulation and filling. The actual process itself may include some or all of the following: filtration, pumping, ingredient addition, mixing, adsorption, filling, labelling, sampling and and storage.

    In this presentation only liquid formulations (“presentations”) will be discussed.

Embed in website or blog