Business Continuity Institute

Channel profile:

Promoting the art and science of BCM Worldwide

The Business Continuity Institute (BCI) was established in 1994 to enable individual members to obtain guidance and support from fellow business continuity practitioners. The BCI currently has over 7,000 members in more than 100 countries.

Subscribers (6,038)
Making the resiliency of your current IT infrastructure count towards your cost The growth of Cloud services presents a perfect opportunity for organisations of all sizes to meet the continuing demand to resume operations quicker and more efficiently when a disaster scenario occurs. Many organisations have improved their resiliency through new ways of delivering IT Services such as virtualisation, but their backup and recovery for the purpose of DR has, in almost all cases, stood still.
As we move more and more to Cloud-based services and evaluate these against current DR methodology, it begins to highlight the gaps that exist between business expectation and what IT can actually deliver. These gaps in time will cost the business in terms of lost revenues and reputation, and whilst it is difficult to count the cost of your reputation being tarnished, counting the cost of lost revenues is much easier to measure.
Cloud services can be cost-effectively utilised to leverage existing IT investments to meet business continuity objectives, such as achieving quicker business resumption. But what is the cost of not implementing ‘DRaaS’ and failing to match your BC strategy with your current IT infrastructure?
Read more >
Mar 21 2014
28 mins
Play

Webinars and videos

  • Live and recorded (129)
  • Upcoming (0)
  • Date
  • Rating
  • Views
  • The growth of Cloud services presents a perfect opportunity for organisations of all sizes to meet the continuing demand to resume operations quicker and more efficiently when a disaster scenario occurs. Many organisations have improved their resiliency through new ways of delivering IT Services such as virtualisation, but their backup and recovery for the purpose of DR has, in almost all cases, stood still.
    As we move more and more to Cloud-based services and evaluate these against current DR methodology, it begins to highlight the gaps that exist between business expectation and what IT can actually deliver. These gaps in time will cost the business in terms of lost revenues and reputation, and whilst it is difficult to count the cost of your reputation being tarnished, counting the cost of lost revenues is much easier to measure.
    Cloud services can be cost-effectively utilised to leverage existing IT investments to meet business continuity objectives, such as achieving quicker business resumption. But what is the cost of not implementing ‘DRaaS’ and failing to match your BC strategy with your current IT infrastructure?
  • The BCI's annual Horizon Scan report, in partnership with BSI, was published in March and revealed that it is the IT-related threats that are continuing to provide the greatest concern for organizations, ranking above other threats such as natural disasters, security incidents and industrial disputes. Three quarters (77%) of business leaders fear the possibility of an unplanned IT and telecoms outage and 73% worry about the possibility of a cyber-attack or data breach. The report also identifies long-term trends, with 73% seeing the use of the internet for malicious attacks as a major threat that needs to be closely monitored, with 63% feeling the same way about the influence of social media. In this webinar, the report's author - Andrew Scott - will discuss the findings in greater depth along with BSI's Lorna Anderson.
  • Mega-trends will not affect your organisation in the same way as a disaster, but they can have a far greater long term strategic impact. Some of these mega-trends will not come to fruition until 2050, and so it's easy to understand why many organisations choose to ignore them in favour of more immediate operational business issues. We at PwC believe that by continuing to ignore them, you leave your organisation exposed to strategic issues and that there are practical solutions that you can implement now to make your organisation more resilient.
  • Are we missing some of the basic building blocks as we aim to deliver a truly resilient technology landscape?

    IT has evolved significantly over the last thirty years. An organisations services in the 70's were often hosted on single pieces of infrastructure with limited connections to other systems. This configuration made disaster recovery and resilience relatively simple. Today, even a moderately sized organisation has services with many connections, both internal and external, and hosts across multiple platforms.

    To be able to build effective resilience or recovery capability an end to end approach has to be taken, which is often contrary to structure of the technology organisation. This in turn puts the availability of services at risk. Failure to respond to this challenge means that organisations are leaving themselves open to significant costs and eroding client relations.

    We aim to discuss this topic at length and will educate our viewers while hopefully leaving them with some practical pointers towards future strategy development.
  • Business Continuity is often seen as the preserve of large regulated corporates and it is sometimes hard to know where to start. Most organizations have limited time and resources and busy schedules. This webinar will show:
    - a time efficient and engaging way of working that includes an deeper understanding of dependencies and responsibilities and form a useful foundation for the work ahead
    - the process and method used, based on clients’ needs and requirements, as a simpler version of the BCM process
    - what is required from the organization and the output from the work
    - that it is not rocket science and simple enough for everybody to use
    This webinar will guide the audience through each step of the methodology and also show examples how is has been used in different contexts depending on type of organization and focus area. It will describe how the preparations is done to achieve effect.
  • On Tuesday 18th March at 11am GMT, as part of Business Continuity Awareness Week, the BCI will host a flashblog (a bit like a flashmob but for bloggers so they don't have to leave their computers). Each blogger wrote a blog all with the same subject - 'counting the costs and benefits of business continuity, a perspective of ' Many different bloggers will be contributing, some working in BC and some just with an interest so the perspectives are varied and all the blogs and with all blogs posted at the same time no one can tell what anyone else has written. In this webinar, the organizer of the flashblog - Ken Simpson - discusses what people wrote and identifies themes and challenges that the industry may face in the future.
  • The costs of business continuity fall into two area: cost of having it and (of course) the cost of not having it. Working with many clients of all sectors and sizes we often see that organisations quantify the costs of implementing business continuity, but fail to win the investment argument with their senior management by quantifying the costs of not investing in effective business resiliency. In this webinar, Tony will set out the approach he takes to building a business case for making that investment.
  • Outsourcing parts of your business is a great way to reduce overheads and improve efficiencies. But do your homework first before deciding to take the plunge on an outsource partner. All too often due diligence stops at the signing of an SLA, whereas In reality there is no guarantee that your SLA partner will even be able to meet it. You need to dig under the hood and take a few extra precautionary steps to ensure delivery, else your business could suffer a common fate when you can least afford it. This webinar will cover the most common pitfalls in outsourcing as well as practical advice on building a robust suppler network.
  • Supply chains are often the heart and soul of an organization. If the supply chain is undisturbed, the business can function normally. If it is disrupted, the consequences could be disastrous. If you are serious about protecting your supply chains, one of the best strategies is to analyze the BCM plans of your principal supply chain partners. In this webinar we'll briefly examine the following:
    - How BCM factors into supply chains
    - The importance of identifying risks to your supply chains
    - What you need from your suppliers on their BCM activities
    - How to obtain supplier BCM plans
    - How to audit supplier BCM plans
  • One of the most damaging assumptions made today, is that common communication modes will operate in a consistent fashion anywhere in the World. By not having a complete understanding of the pitfalls, nuances and even legislation in certain markets, can lead to the failure of your notification/alerting strategy, which may have a severe impact on the success of your Business Continuity plan. This webinar will provide an insight into some of the challenges that organisations face and how they can dramatically improve the results of a successful Critical Communications strategy.

Embed in website or blog