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Data Center Management

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  • Q4 2018 Community Update: Data Privacy & Information Management in 2019
    Q4 2018 Community Update: Data Privacy & Information Management in 2019
    Jill Reber, CEO, Primitive Logic and Kelly Harris, Senior Content Manager, BrightTALK Recorded: Dec 18 2018 47 mins
    Discover what's trending in the Enterprise Architecture community on BrightTALK and how you can leverage these insights to drive growth for your company. Learn which topics and technologies are currently top of mind for Data Privacy and Information Management professionals and decision makers.

    Tune in with Jill Reber, CEO of Primitive Logic and Kelly Harris, Senior Content Manager for EA at BrightTALK, to discover the latest trends in data privacy, the reasons behind them and what to look out for in Q1 2019 and beyond.

    - Top trending topics in Q4 2018 and why, including new GDPR and data privacy regulations
    - Key events in the community
    - Content that data privacy and information management professionals care about
    - What's coming up in Q1 2019

    Audience members are encouraged to ask questions during the Live Q&A.
  • Introduction to SNIA Swordfish™ ─ Scalable Storage Management
    Introduction to SNIA Swordfish™ ─ Scalable Storage Management
    Daniel Sazbon, SNIA Europe Chair, IBM; Alex McDonald, SNIA Europe Vice Chair, NetApp Recorded: Dec 4 2018 39 mins
    The SNIA Swordfish™ specification helps to provide a unified approach for the management of storage and servers in hyperscale and cloud infrastructure environments, making it easier for IT administrators to integrate scalable solutions into their data centers. Swordfish builds on the Distributed Management Task Force’s (DMTF’s) Redfish® specification using the same easy-to-use RESTful methods and lightweight JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) formatting. Join this session to receive an overview of Swordfish including the new functionality added in version 1.0.6 released in March, 2018.
  • Extending RDMA for Persistent Memory over Fabrics
    Extending RDMA for Persistent Memory over Fabrics
    Tony Hurson, Intel; Rob Davis, Mellanox; John Kim, Mellanox Recorded: Oct 25 2018 60 mins
    For datacenter applications requiring low-latency access to persistent storage, byte-addressable persistent memory (PM) technologies like 3D XPoint and MRAM are attractive solutions. Network-based access to PM, labeled here PM over Fabrics (PMoF), is driven by data scalability and/or availability requirements. Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) network protocols are a good match for PMoF, allowing direct RDMA Write of data to remote PM. However, the completion of an RDMA Write at the sending node offers no guarantee that data has reached persistence at the target. This webcast will outline extensions to RDMA protocols that confirm such persistence and additionally can order successive writes to different memories within the target system.

    The primary target audience is developers of low-latency and/or high-availability datacenter storage applications. The presentation will also be of broader interest to datacenter developers, administrators and users.

    After you watch, check-out our Q&A blog from the webcast: http://bit.ly/2DFE7SL
  • Centralized vs. Distributed Storage
    Centralized vs. Distributed Storage
    John Kim, Mellanox; Alex McDonald, NetApp; J Metz, Cisco Recorded: Sep 11 2018 63 mins
    In the history of enterprise storage there has been a trend to move from local storage to centralized, networked storage. Customers found that networked storage provided higher utilization, centralized and hence cheaper management, easier failover, and simplified data protection, which has driven the move to FC-SAN, iSCSI, NAS and object storage.

    Recently, distributed storage has become more popular where storage lives in multiple locations but can still be shared. Advantages of distributed storage include the ability to scale-up performance and capacity simultaneously and--in the hyperconverged use case--to use each node (server) for both compute and storage. Attend this webcast to learn about:
    •Pros and cons of centralized vs. distributed storage
    •Typical use cases for centralized and distributed storage
    •How distributed works for SAN, NAS, parallel file systems, and object storage
    •How hyperconverged has introduced a new way of consuming storage

    After the webcast, please check out our Q&A blog http://bit.ly/2xSajxJ
  • Fibre Channel Interoperability
    Fibre Channel Interoperability
    Barry Maskas, HPE; Tim Sheehan, University of New Hampshire Interoperability Lab; David Rodgers, Teledyne LeCroy Recorded: Aug 23 2018 68 mins
    Interoperability is a primary basis for the predictable behavior of a Fibre Channel (FC) SAN. FC interoperability implies standards conformance by definition. Interoperability also implies exchanges between a range of products, or similar products from one or more different suppliers, or even between past and future revisions of the same products. Interoperability may be developed as a special measure between two products, while excluding the rest, and still be standards conformant. When a supplier is forced to adapt its system to a system that is not based on standards, it is not interoperability but rather, only compatibility.

    Every FC hardware and software supplier publishes an interoperability matrix and per product conformance based on having validated conformance, compatibility, and interoperability. There are many dimensions to interoperability, from the physical layer, optics, and cables; to port type and protocol; to server, storage, and switch fabric operating systems versions; standards and feature implementation compatibility; and to use case topologies based on the connectivity protocol (F-port, N-Port, NP-port, E-port, TE-port, D-port).

    In this session we will delve into the many dimensions of FC interoperability, discussing:

    •Standards and conformance
    •Validation of conformance and interoperability
    •FC-NVMe conformance and interoperability
    •Interoperability matrices
    •Multi-generational interoperability
    •Use case examples of interoperability

    After you watch the webcast, check out the FC Interoperability Q&A blog https://fibrechannel.org/a-qa-on-fibre-channel-interoperability/
  • FCoE vs. iSCSI vs. iSER
    FCoE vs. iSCSI vs. iSER
    J Metz, Cisco; Saqib Jang, Chelsio; Rob Davis, Mellanox; Tim Lustig, Mellanox Recorded: Jun 21 2018 62 mins
    The “Great Storage Debates” webcast series continues, this time on FCoE vs. iSCSI vs. iSER. Like past “Great Storage Debates,” the goal of this presentation is not to have a winner emerge, but rather provide vendor-neutral education on the capabilities and use cases of these technologies so that attendees can become more informed and make educated decisions.

    One of the features of modern data centers is the ubiquitous use of Ethernet. Although many data centers run multiple separate networks (Ethernet and Fibre Channel (FC)), these parallel infrastructures require separate switches, network adapters, management utilities and staff, which may not be cost effective.

    Multiple options for Ethernet-based SANs enable network convergence, including FCoE (Fibre Channel over Ethernet) which allows FC protocols over Ethernet and Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) for transport of SCSI commands over TCP/IP-Ethernet networks. There are also new Ethernet technologies that reduce the amount of CPU overhead in transferring data from server to client by using Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA), which is leveraged by iSER (iSCSI Extensions for RDMA) to avoid unnecessary data copying.

    That leads to several questions about FCoE, iSCSI and iSER:

    •If we can run various network storage protocols over Ethernet, what
    differentiates them?
    •What are the advantages and disadvantages of FCoE, iSCSI and iSER?
    •How are they structured?
    •What software and hardware do they require?
    •How are they implemented, configured and managed?
    •Do they perform differently?
    •What do you need to do to take advantage of them in the data center?
    •What are the best use cases for each?

    Join our SNIA experts as they answer all these questions and more on the next Great Storage Debate.

    After you watch the webcast, check out the Q&A blog from our presenters http://bit.ly/2NyJKUM
  • FICON 101
    FICON 101
    Patty Driever, IBM; Howard Johnson, Broadcom; J Metz, Cisco Recorded: Jun 19 2018 62 mins
    FICON (Fibre Channel Connection) is an upper-level protocol supported by mainframe servers and attached enterprise-class storage controllers that utilize Fibre Channel as the underlying transport. Mainframes are built to provide a robust and resilient IT infrastructure, and FICON is a key element of their ability to meet the increasing demands placed on reliable and efficient access to data. What are some of the key objectives and benefits of the FICON protocol? And what are the characteristics that make FICON relevant in today’s data centers for mission-critical workloads?

    Join us in this live FCIA webcast where you’ll learn:

    • Basic mainframe I/O terminology
    • The characteristics of mainframe I/O and FICON architecture
    • Key features and benefits of FICON

    After you watch the webcast, check out the Q&A blog: https://fibrechannel.org/ficon-webcast-qa/
  • Everything You Wanted To Know...But Were Too Proud To Ask - Storage Controllers
    Everything You Wanted To Know...But Were Too Proud To Ask - Storage Controllers
    Peter Onufryk, Microsemi, Craig Carlson, Cavium, Chad Hintz, Cisco, John Kim, Mellanox, J Metz, Cisco Recorded: May 15 2018 48 mins
    Are you a control freak? Have you ever wondered what was the difference between a storage controller, a RAID controller, a PCIe Controller, or a metadata controller? What about an NVMe controller? Aren’t they all the same thing?

    In part Aqua of the “Everything You Wanted To Know About Storage But Were Too Proud To Ask” webcast series, we’re going to be taking an unusual step of focusing on a term that is used constantly, but often has different meanings. When you have a controller that manages hardware, there are very different requirements than a controller that manages an entire system-wide control plane. From the outside looking in, it may be easy to get confused. You can even have controllers managing other controllers!
    Here we’ll be revisiting some of the pieces we talked about in Part Chartreuse [https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/663/215131], but with a bit more focus on the variety we have to play with:
    •What do we mean when we say “controller?”
    •How are the systems being managed different?
    •How are controllers used in various storage entities: drives, SSDs, storage networks, software-defined
    •How do controller systems work, and what are the trade-offs?
    •How do storage controllers protect against Spectre and Meltdown?
    Join us to learn more about the workhorse behind your favorite storage systems.

    After you watch the webcast, check out the Q&A blog at http://bit.ly/2JgcHlM
  • Fibre Channel Cabling
    Fibre Channel Cabling
    Zach Nason, Data Center Systems, Greg McSorley, Amphenol-Highspeed, Mark Jones, Broadcom Recorded: Apr 19 2018 44 mins
    Looking for more cost-effective ways to implement fibre channel cabling? Learn why proper cabling is important and how it fits into data center designs. Join this webcast to hear FCIA experts discuss:
    - Cable and connector types, cassettes, patch panels and other cabling products
    - Variables in Fiber Optic and Copper Cables: Reflectance, Insertion Loss,
    Crosstalk, Speed/Length Limitations and more
    - Different variations of Structured Cabling in an environment with FC
    - Helpful tips when planning and implementing a cabling infrastructure within a SAN

    After you watch the webcast, check out the Q&A blog: http://bit.ly/2KdtEx0
  • Introduction to SNIA Swordfish™ ─ Scalable Storage Management
    Introduction to SNIA Swordfish™ ─ Scalable Storage Management
    Richelle Ahlvers, Broadcom; Don Deel, NetApp Recorded: Apr 19 2018 62 mins
    The SNIA Swordfish™ specification helps to provide a unified approach for the management of storage and servers in hyperscale and cloud infrastructure environments, making it easier for IT administrators to integrate scalable solutions into their data centers. Swordfish builds on the Distributed Management Task Force’s (DMTF’s) Redfish® specification using the same easy-to-use RESTful methods and lightweight JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) formatting. Join this session to receive an overview of Swordfish including the new functionality added in version 1.0.6 released in March, 2018.

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