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IEA Clean Coal Centre Webinars

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  • What does the Minamata convention mean for coal?
    What does the Minamata convention mean for coal? Dr Lesley Sloss Recorded: Oct 25 2017 28 mins
    This timely webinar will review the implications of the Minamata Convention on Mercury on coal. COP1, the 1st Conference of the Parties, of the convention was held in Geneva at the end of September. Tune in to to get a full update on the final text of the Minamata Convention on Mercury and a discussion on the potential consequences for emerging economies who have a significant dependence on coal.

    UNEP (the United Nations Environment Programme) first raised the issue of mercury as the most important, unregulated, pollutant in the global environment in the mid 2000s and, in response, established the first INC (International Negotiating Committee) and the UNEP Partnership Areas in 2008. The IEA CCC has been lead of the Coal Partnership since its inception.

    Coordinating mercury reduction programmes throughout the world will include numerous social, economic and technological challenges and will be dependent on technology transfer as well as significant international funding. By the time COP1 of Minamata eventually closed, 83 countries had signed the Minamata convention and committed to developing national implementation plans. The next step will be the acceptance of those plans and, ultimately, the movement of these plans into action.
  • Overcoming barriers to  carbon capture through international collaboration
    Overcoming barriers to carbon capture through international collaboration Toby Lockwood Recorded: Sep 27 2017 32 mins
    Carbon capture and storage must be implemented on a global scale if ambitious targets for greenhouse gas emissions are to be met, yet deployment of the technology over the last decade has been slow. CCS faces a number of unique barriers, including high upfront costs and investment risks, uncertain public and political support, and a need for new regulatory regimes. To help overcome these barriers, a number of formal collaborations have been established between countries with commitments to CCS development. Multilateral initiatives such as the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum and the Clean Energy Ministerial have sought to share research experience, spread favourable policy and regulation, promote public acceptance, and build mutual trust on commitment to CCS. Several bilateral agreements, often between an OECD country and China, have also been created over the last decade with a view to promote investment and joint research into CCS. This webinar will briefly review the barriers to CCS development and highlight the work of some key multilateral and bilateral initiatives, as well as the challenges they have faced.
  • Environmental impacts from coal mining and transport
    Environmental impacts from coal mining and transport Dr Lesley Sloss Recorded: Aug 23 2017 47 mins
    This webinar addresses the environmental effects of coal mining and related transport, reviewing the potential environmental impacts arising at all stages of the coal chain. Potential environmental impacts from emissions of dust, water, and local land use are reviewed, highlighting emerging techniques to limit and reduce negative effects.

    Examples of best practice for mine operation, transport logistics and dust control will demonstrate the potential for improved performance and environmental sustainability in the field. Socioeconomic impacts, as well as regional employment and community engagement, are also covered. In this day and age mining companies will need to comply with environmental law as well as demonstrating best practice and public engagement to have new projects approved.
  • HELE perspectives for selected Asian countries
    HELE perspectives for selected Asian countries Dr Ian Barnes Recorded: Jul 26 2017 25 mins
    This webinar sets out the results of an examination of the prospects for HELE (high efficiency, low emission) technologies in ten major coal-using countries. A recent study examined the role of HELE coal-fired power plant in helping to meet the goal of reduced carbon dioxide emissions. A number of smaller but still significant coal-using counties, based mostly in South East Asia, have attracted attention regarding the future development of their coal-powered generating fleets to meet the needs of their developing economies. These countries are: Bangladesh, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam.
  • Innovative approaches to improving flexibility and emissions from coal-fired pow
    Innovative approaches to improving flexibility and emissions from coal-fired pow Dr Stephen Mills Recorded: Jun 21 2017 38 mins
    Innovative approaches to improving flexibility and emissions from coal-fired power plants. Combining solar power, or natural gas cofiring with coal-fired power plant. Innovative approaches to improving flexibility and emissions from coal-fired power plants. Combining solar power, or natural gas cofiring with coal-fired power plant.
    To remain competitive, coal-fired fleets are having to adapt to meet the changing circumstances. Increasingly flexible operation is a key factor in this, and power generators are exploring possible routes forward. New techniques and strategies are being considered or adopted in order to maintain the commercial and economic viability of coal-fired plants.
    There are a number of ways in which power plant flexibility can be enhanced – this webinar explores two techniques that show potential - combining solar energy with coal-fired generation, and cofiring natural gas with coal. Both techniques are already used on a commercial basis, although deployment levels are currently low. However, under the appropriate conditions, both show potential for application to some existing and new-build power plants.
  • Power generation from coal using supercritical CO2
    Power generation from coal using supercritical CO2 Dr. Qian Zhu Recorded: May 24 2017 29 mins
    The supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle energy conversion system is an innovative concept that converts heat energy to electrical energy through the use of supercritical CO2 as working fluid rather than through steam and water. In this webinar, Qian will give a brief description of supercritical CO2 power cycles and review the recent technology advances in developing supercritical CO2 cycle power generation systems for fossil fuels.
  • Coal beneficiation. Feedstock quality is key for power station performance
    Coal beneficiation. Feedstock quality is key for power station performance Dr Ian Reid Recorded: Apr 19 2017 30 mins
    This webinar examines technical developments in coal beneficiation covering dense-media and dry coal treatment, and upgrading various technologies.

    Amid a global trend to use low quality, inexpensive coal, it is now recognised that feedstock quality is a key element of a future power strategy to raise power station performance and meet environmental legislation. Preparing feedstock in order to remove inert matter and reduce contaminants can benefit every aspect of a coal plant operation. We examine technical developments in coal beneficiation covering dense-media and dry coal treatment, and upgrading technologies such as coal refining, digestion, oxidation, fuel blending and biomass substitution.

    Lignite or brown coal, the lowest quality coal, is normally used in its raw state resulting in significant energy and reliability penalties. Energy efficient technologies to reduce moisture and ash levels can significantly improve performance. As lignite demand declines in OECD countries, alternate markets are being sought that utilise synthesised humates.
  • Trends in international financing of coal-fired power plants
    Trends in international financing of coal-fired power plants Paul Baruya Recorded: Mar 22 2017 33 mins
    What are the major institutional challenges and financial opportunities emerging for new HELE coal power plants? This webinar will examine the trends in coal project finance worldwide and accompanies one of the latest reports published by the IEA Clean Coal Centre.

    Publicly funded financial institutions such as multilateral development banks (MDB) and export credit agencies (ECA) based in OECD America and Europe have, since 2013, adopted strict lending rules for greenfield coal power projects. Greenfield projects may be supported financially, but it they will be authorised under rare and exceptional circumstances only. However, these particular financial institutions form a fairly small proportion of the funding made available to coal power projects worldwide. There is evidence that many other banks are willing to support High Efficiency and Low Emission, or HELE, coal technology in Asia, even in the wake of COP21.

    In Asia, public funding agencies and commercial banks in Japan, Korea, and China are pursuing coal projects abroad with the view of exporting their own HELE technologies to other regions, even into Europe. This means the impact of reduced funding from western public agencies might not be so severe. Furthermore, the arrival of the newly formed Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) could provide exciting opportunities for funding of cleaner coal technologies in the future.
  • Water conservation in coal-fired power plants
    Water conservation in coal-fired power plants Anne Carpenter Recorded: Feb 23 2017 43 mins
    The vulnerability of the power generation industry to constraints in water availability is widespread and growing, and this is increasing the pressure on power plant operators to conserve water. This webinar will discuss where water can be conserved or recovered within pulverised coal-fired power plants. It will include ways of saving water in bottom ash handling, pollution control (flue gas desulphurisation), and cooling systems. Cooling typically accounts for the largest usage of water (where water is the coolant), and wet flue gas desulphurisation is the second largest use at wet-cooled plants. Techniques for recovering water from the pulveriser and pre-dryer exhausts, and from the flue gas are also discussed. There is an opportunity for power plants to become a supplier of both electricity and water, if sufficient water can be economically recovered from the flue gas. This could be a way forward for some coal fired power plants in the future, as well as helping to solve local fresh water shortages.
  • Emerging markets for pollution control technologies
    Emerging markets for pollution control technologies Dr Lesley Sloss Recorded: Jan 18 2017 45 mins
    Legislation is being implemented around the world to reduce emissions of pollutants from coal-fired power plants. For those countries that started to apply control strategies several years ago, the control technology market has evolved alongside the legislation in a somewhat piecemeal manner. So the majority of older plants in developed regions have applied controls in series: control technologies for particulates first, followed by controls for SO2, and then controls for NOx. New legislation is introducing requirements for mercury and fine particulate control in some regions, often requiring further retrofitting of additional control systems. For those emerging regions that are just starting to bring in control requirements, there is the option of copying this piece-by-piece approach to control, or alternatively to apply newer technologies which can control several pollutants simultaneously. This multi-pollutant approach could be cost-effective in many regions. However, the applicability of different technologies varies. For example, regions with high ash and/or high sulphur coals may require different control strategies from those with intrinsically cleaner coals. Also, availability of water, land and funds will all play a role in determining which technology will be applied at each plant. And so the control technology market that is currently expanding in Asia may differ significantly from that in North America and the EU. The international marketing strategies for emission control technology manufacturers must take into account differences in performance standards, economic challenges, business traditions and many other factors. This webinar summarises the potential markets for emissions control noting the areas for potential growth, such as China, Poland, India and Indonesia. Each has its own regional issues.

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