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IOP Publishing

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  • Simulating MEMS and Smart Materials with COMSOL Multiphysics®
    Simulating MEMS and Smart Materials with COMSOL Multiphysics® Dr Robbie Balcombe, Technical Director, COMSOL Live 60 mins
    If you are interested in modelling smart materials and MEMS using COMSOL Multiphysics®, then tune into this webinar.

    Smart materials are materials whose properties or shape respond dynamically to stimuli in their environment. For example, piezoelectric materials experience strain under an applied electric field, while magnetostrictive materials deform in the presence of a magnetic field.

    In this live webinar, you will learn how to model MEMS sensors and actuators based on smart materials for a wide range of applications, including vibration and active shape control as well as structural health monitoring and energy harvesting. We will also demonstrate the applicability of the COMSOL Multiphysics® simulation environment for coupling mechanical, electrical and thermal models of smart materials.

    At the end of this webinar, you can ask questions during the Q&A session.
  • The medical physics revolution continues:  the next 60 years
    The medical physics revolution continues: the next 60 years Robert Jeraj, Professor, Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin Recorded: Mar 22 2017 48 mins
    In the fifth and final of our series of webinars showcasing presentations from the PMB 60th Anniversary Symposium, Robert Jeraj from the University of Wisconsin takes a look at what may lie ahead for medical physics in the next 60 years.
  • Simulating Electromagnetic Communication & Interference with COMSOL Multiphysics
    Simulating Electromagnetic Communication & Interference with COMSOL Multiphysics Dr Simone Zonetti, Applications Engineer, COMSOL Recorded: Feb 28 2017 60 mins
    The physics of electromagnetic coupling through space is fundamental to modern technology. It is exploited in some devices such as RFID tags and directional couplers to communicate information. In other devices, electromagnetic interference (EMI) is an unwanted effect that must be controlled: for example, the problem of crosstalk in electrical circuits and cables. In this webinar we will discuss the simulation of electromagnetic coupling in a variety of different applications, considering examples of capacitive, inductive and radiative couplings in frequencies from the kHz to GHz range. We will show how modelling can provide insight into design, either to improve the quality of a communication device, or to mitigate EMI through effective electromagnetic shielding. A live demo will illustrate how to simulate antenna crosstalk using COMSOL Multiphysics®. We will conclude this webinar with a Q&A session.
  • New horizons for adaptive therapy and dose guidance
    New horizons for adaptive therapy and dose guidance Katia Parodi, Chair of Experimental Physics – Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München Germany Recorded: Feb 22 2017 52 mins
    In the fourth of our series of webinars showcasing presentations from the PMB 60th Anniversary Symposium, Katia Parodi examines the key ingredients of modern adaptive radiotherapy, including fast computational models and methods for in-vivo dose/range assessment. She also takes a look forward to the era of biological guidance.
  • Implementing MRI and MR-SIM for Radiation Oncology:  What you need to know
    Implementing MRI and MR-SIM for Radiation Oncology: What you need to know Carri K Glide-Hurst, PhD, DABR Senior Staff Physicist, Henry Ford Health System Recorded: Feb 15 2017 61 mins
    Almost all clinics, small and large, use magnetic resonance images (MRI) in their treatment-planning workflows. Modern treatment planning requires images of high geometric fidelity with high spatial and contrast resolution to delineate disease extent and proximity to adjacent organs at risk. However, imaging protocols needed for accurate treatment planning differ significantly from those used in diagnostic radiology. As the integration of MRI into radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, a need exists to highlight the considerations for safe and effective implementation. This webinar will describe the major differences from diagnostic MRI, provide an overview of MRI safety and training models, introduce clinical-workflow considerations, and describe the development of a robust quality-assurance programme. Special considerations for motion management and treatment planning will be described.
  • Photonic, plasmonic, and multiphysics simulations using CST STUDIO SUITE
    Photonic, plasmonic, and multiphysics simulations using CST STUDIO SUITE Dr Frank H Scharf, Principal Engineer CST of America Recorded: Jan 19 2017 60 mins
    Optical devices are key components in many areas, such as communications, remote sensing and medical applications, and their role will increase in the future. Simulations are already a very efficient way of optimizing a device, even before the prototype stage. However, simulating optical devices needs distinct consideration due to the special material models, such as graphene, or simply due to the size of the device in relation to the wavelengths of interest.

    CST STUDIO SUITE® offers a unique platform for handling such challenges. The user may import or build even highly complex structures using a user-friendly, interactive GUI. The photonic/plasmonic behaviour of the device can then be simulated by selecting the most appropriate algorithm (e.g. FIT/FDTD, FEM, BEM/MoM, MLFMM and more). Dispersive, anisotropic and nonlinear materials are supported. High-performance computing (HPC) options, such as MPI or GPU, are available, and the results can be displayed and analysed in the GUI using a comprehensive post-processing library and state-of-the-art visualization engine.

    In addition, CST STUDIO SUITE® includes multiphysics solvers linked to EM, allowing users to, for example, simulate the effect of thermal tuning.

    This webinar will demonstrate how CST STUDIO SUITE can be used to analyse a number of essential optical devices, such as silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide components, photonic crystals (PC), plasmonic devices and optical gratings.
  • Exploring flatlands: characterizing 2D materials with atomic force microscopy
    Exploring flatlands: characterizing 2D materials with atomic force microscopy Prof. Andras Kis, EPFL, STI-IEL-LANES and Keith Jones, Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Recorded: Dec 13 2016 60 mins
    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has played an essential role in 2D materials research since it was used to confirm the first isolation of graphene. Today’s AFMs are even more powerful, with higher spatial resolution, faster imaging rates, greater environmental control and enhanced modes for mapping physical properties. They can image crystal lattice structure as well as nanoscale morphology, and sense local electrical, mechanical and functional response in more ways than ever before.

    In this webinar we explore the latest AFM tools that enable higher resolution, sensitivity and more quantitative results for analysing 2D materials. We’ll present results from measurements of a variety of 2D materials for device manufacturing, energy storage and optoelectronics including:
    • MoS2 and graphene;
    • measurements of mechanical properties;
    • kelvin probe imaging (KPFM) of operating transistors;
    • electromechanical measurements.

    We specifically detail AFM modes including:
    • conductive AFM;
    • KPFM;
    • piezoresponse imaging;
    • scanning microwave impedance imaging (sMIM).

    Finally, we discuss how AFM can now be used to accurately determine the thickness of single or multiple layers of a 2D material. This will challenge the misconception that AFM cannot be used to precisely measure the thickness of 2D materials.
  • From vision to sight: "See what you treat"
    From vision to sight: "See what you treat" Bas Raaymakers Professor of experimental clinical physics UMC Utrecht, The Netherlands Recorded: Dec 13 2016 48 mins
    In the third of our webinars showcasing presentations from the PMB 60th Anniversary Symposium, Bas Raaymakers examines the use of image guidance during radiation therapy. He will describe the various options available for radiotherapy guidance, including in-room CT-on-rails, MV imaging, fluoroscopy, ultrasound, tracking of implanted beacons and cone-beam CT. In particular, he will discuss the use of MRI for real-time visualization of the tumour and its surroundings during treatment.
  • Efficient ODE Set-up and Results Processing for Particle Trajectory Simulation
    Efficient ODE Set-up and Results Processing for Particle Trajectory Simulation Dr. Doug Craigen: Team Leader, Testing and Benchmarking, Integrated Engineering Software Recorded: Dec 6 2016 60 mins
    This webinar addresses practical computational issues in discrete calculations of the path of charged or multipole particles in electric and magnetic fields.

    We begin by showing the theory and an Excel macro implementation of some standard ODE time-based solvers as applied to the charged-particle case. We also discuss potential benefits of a nonstandard distance-based solver configuration.

    Next some examples are provided to illustrate trade-offs between the number of calculations and the accuracy of the result according to various criteria. For example, depending on one’s needs, the simulation set-up might produce output that is either a dense set of (x, y, z) points that plot as a smooth curve, or a much sparser set of points that are individually more accurate than the dense set.

    The webinar will end by examining what can be done with the data obtained. Calculations based on a linear interpolation between points are straightforward, but may force one to use an inefficient ODE set-up. This can take excessive computation resources, hence a longer time than necessary to produce accurate results. Some alternatives will be demonstrated using various degrees of physical insight to get the most information possible from the given ODE output data.

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