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EC-Council | Security Channel

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  • With each passing year, the frequency and number of organisations that are hacked increases at a dizzying rate. No industry vertical can ignore this trend. One of the key challenges facing all business is to come to grips rapidly with an ever-changing threat landscape.

    How can your organisation understand specifically what threats is being targeted with? In order to answer this question business need to be able to quantify and qualify the threats aligned against them. In essence being able to understand what malicious actor’s know about an organisation and how that knowledge may be deployed in attack campaigns and vectors.

    During the course of the webinar session, Blueliv’s Cyber Security Development Manager, Nahim Fazal will present the Blueliv proposal for improving the cyber threat visibility of a business.

    Key Takeaways:
    - Why the same approach gives the same results
    - Actionable intelligence – what does this look like in the real world?
    - Reducing your cost and incident response time
  • Penetration testing is just one element in the overall process of obtaining confidence in the cyber security of the organisation. Consideration to security must be given in the architectural design of networks and the coding of applications and website. Where this is not the case penetration testing will provide an indication of what should be done to retrospectively apply security or to provide a ‘patch’ to make things better.

    Many investigations of cyber attacks have highlighted that the system has been compromised for some time, often years, without the system owner knowing. The penetration test provides an insight into the internal controls and the ability of the SOC or NOC to identify attacks. If the test is conducted and there is no indication that it has been detected, it is highly likely that real attacks have not been detected either and further analysis is required.

    It must be recognised that no security is impenetrable and therefore the ability to react to a cyber security incident is really important. The penetration testing is essential to test the organisation’s ability to respond. The statement that a penetration test will be quickly out of date is valid to some extent but without it the organisation is blind to the types of threats it is exposed to and the vulnerabilities in the systems. To be effective the testing programme must be placed in context and the links between assurance activities fully understood.
  • The increased complexity and frequency of attacks, combined with reduced effectiveness of detective or preventative control frameworks, elevate the need for organisations to roll out enterprise wide incident response initiatives to ensure rapid containment and eradication of threats.

    In this webcast, Don Smith, Technology Director at Dell SecureWorks, describes three organisation’s experience with “APT” actors, examining techniques deployed for intrusion, persistence, lateral expansion and exfiltration.

    Don will highlight where changes to the detective or preventative control frameworks could have prevented the attackers from achieving their objectives and outline key steps to building a robust incident response plan.

    Webcast takeaways include:

    · Real-world examples of APT attacks from the coalface

    · The latest tools and techniques that advanced threat actors are using

    · Recommendations for preventing and responding to APTs
  • It’s no secret that there are botnets for hire, groups of computers that can, and are, used against our organizations on a daily basis. But what is the nature of these botnets? What abilities do each of the installed toolkits offer to the attacker? Most importantly how do their capabilities change the defenses necessary to protect yourself?

    We’ll cover two of the most recent toolkits that have been seeing wide usage. Learn a little about the people behind the attacks, where the attacks are coming from and what you might expect to see in the near future. You might be a bit surprised at where a lot of the traffic is coming from (hint: it’s closer than you think).
  • In this webinar I will discuss what security culture is, where it belongs in the organisation, and how good security culture can reduce the likelihood of being breached. I will point to research on culture, human behaviours, and how to motivate people to do the right thing.
  • A traditional penetration test is a snapshot of vulnerabilities for an environment that is in constant flux. The snapshot may also be an incomplete picture, addressing only a portion of a more complex system. To give a view of real business risk, can we link the vulnerabilities to real-world threats and, more importantly, vice versa? Wouldn’t it be better to start with the threats and work forward down the kill chain to the target? How feasible is it to take up-to-date threat intelligence and use that to scope our penetration tests? Peter Wood will try to answer these questions and provide a strategy better suited to today’s attacks.
  • Wireless is now the expected medium of choice for network users. Delivering it successfully can be a challenge especially with multiple different approaches and architectures available. What is right for your organisation? Cloud? Controller? How is it all secured?

    This session will discuss 3 main Wi-Fi architecture types, their different advantages, the wired edge, and how to secure it all. Importantly, we will finish with what to consider when making the right choice for your needs.
  • The use of third parties is unavoidable in today’s global economy. The growing use of third party suppliers and business partners, whilst bringing significant business advantages, also exposes organisations to substantial risk, such as financial loss, reputational damage, regulatory prosecution and fines from major breaches of security. In the last few years we’ve witnessed many of these risks being realised; examples have included major breaches of security and costs to recover escalating into millions of dollars, as a result of the third party supplier being comprised. Changes in regulation, the evolving threat landscape and policy changes globally further complicate matters, generating further risk and expense for business.

    Despite considerable efforts from many industries to address these issues, it remains difficult to manage. As well as the risks described, companies perceived as the ‘weakest link’ in the supply chain could end up not having third party contracts renewed. These challenges are discussed in more detail, and some suggestions put forward to help tackle the increasing burden on teams and risk mitigation strategies.
  • How can companies effectively measure their company’s risk of a data breach? What security metrics are most important when it comes to determining breach risk? How do different types of security compromises, whether botnet infections or brand name SSL vulnerabilities, contribute to an organization’s risk profile? Can you aggregate data to create high-level ratings to measure and report on cybersecurity risk?

    Join BitSight’s Chief Technology Officer Stephen Boyer and Senior Data Scientist Jay Jacobs to get these questions answered - and more. This data driven webinar will highlight the extensive analysis that the BitSight Data Science team undertakes to make security signals into concrete risk mitigation actions. Perhaps most importantly, the speakers will give guidance on how security and risk professionals at every level - from the board room to the server room - can drive positive change throughout their organizations.

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