Using Epic for Fragment Library Screening

Kartik Narya
Fragment libraries can be designed to probe a significant fraction of chemical space, but screening such relatively large libraries in short order may be problematic using traditional flow-cell based biosensors. Plate-based biosensors offer increased throughput while using similar coupling chemistries found in other systems such as GE Biacore. Previously reported studies have typically used Carbonic Anhydrase and other small proteins to investigate fragment binding. Here, fragment binding data collected using the Corning Epic System from two medium-sized, 50 KD proteins is presented.
Feb 3 2011
45 mins
Using Epic for Fragment Library Screening
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  • Title: Using Epic for Fragment Library Screening
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