Leadership

Community information
Leadership styles are continually evolving to incorporate new ways of thinking about employee satisfaction, motivation and performance. Find webinars and videos on the strategies, techniques and qualities that make an effective leader. By participating in this community you will gain insight into current leadership theories and how to optimize employee performance.
  • During this webinar, Mustafa will explain how the GSM sector tasked to provide a public service by means of “communication” following natural disasters.

    He will discuss how the business continuity team coped in terms of Business Continuity, Information Services and Network Operations, Emergency Management & stakeholder communication via briefing some used cases. He will also explain used cases helped as an organisation to develop guidelines to determine tasks/actions to be performed for further possible cases & improvement areas to develop their processes. He will provide analysis from the ‘post mortem’ analysis that they made following the incident, and the lessons learned that you could apply around your business continuity strategies within your organisation.
  • “Following on from David’s article in this quarters Continuity Magazine entitled “The Parry and Riposte of Procurement and BCM” Page 31. David expands on his words “ This article is meant to provoke thought and although I could, I won’t offer a potential process” In this webinar David offers practical methods to deliver resilient supply chains based on his experiences as a Head of Procurement and a Corporate Business Continuity Manager for a FTSE 100 UK based company. David is the author of Continuity Shop’s course on supply chain risk and continuity and was the UK Principal Expert attending the finalisation of the ISO 22318 technical specification on Supply Chain Continuity Management in Japan this year.

    Both Business Continuity professionals and procurement professionals would benefit from this webinar, so why not invite your procurement teams to listen in too?
  • Great communication starts with great listening. And great listening starts with an inner listening called Mindfulness, a simple practice done 10-20 min. a day that makes an average communicator into a great one. Transform hollow interactions into engaged, dynamic relationships by being present and in the moment. Learn why successful organizations all over the world are bringing Mindfulness to the workplace. Developing inner awareness leads to productive relationship building, sharpening crucial skills in management, improving sales & operations at successful firms. Win the trust across the spectrum of those you communicate with, from clients to colleagues, employees to senior management, in every interaction.

    You Will Learn:
    1.What Mindfulness is & why it is useful in the business world.
    2.How this simple practice enhances self-awareness, making one a potent & attentive listener.
    3.How to be 100% in the present moment, focused, free of distractions.
    4.A 5-phase process that leads to effective communication & deep trust, yielding sustainable professional & personal relationships.
    5.How Mindfulness training has been embraced across industries, including health, financial services, technology, government, journalism, entertainment, social services, think tanks, law enforcement, the military & education. (Google, Apple, Aetna, Virgin, Madison Wisconsin Police Dept, Congress, & House of Commons.)

    Can’t Miss Takeaway:
    You will:
    •Learn the daily practice of Mindfulness & how it delivers practical benefits.
    •Have access to an audio guide to a daily Mindfulness practice.
    •Receive a free on-line copy of George Kinder’s book, Transforming Suffering into Wisdom: Mindfulness & The Art of Inner Listening.

    Who Should Attend?
    Anyone who wishes to be more effective in their communication skills, with greater control, clearer focus, more patience, flexibility & skill, greater leadership & access to intuition, values, creativity, & managing stress & difficult emotions with poise.
  • Today a proactive approach is needed to ensure the ability to adapt to unexpected risks ever more quickly and cost-effectively, to bounce back…resilience.

    Resilience is the capability of an organization to deal with incidents that cannot be predicted and to adapt to changes over which we have no control. This presentation will explore the relationship between business continuity management and resilience and some of the ways to build a more resilient organization.
  • Just as any organization can face risks and threats and have vulnerabilities; the same is true with members of supply chains. Individual suppliers can be at risk through a variety of events, such as fires, floods, technology failures and power outages.

    This webinar discusses risks to supply chains and will provide guidance on identifying those risks and defining strategies for mitigating them.
  • This webinar underlines the fundamental importance of the one of the most important phases in the BCM lifecycle – the BIA.

    Other - subsequent - phases such as selecting one or more business continuity strategies or the formulation of a BC plan, exhibit a much smaller space of choices than the BIA, which is primarily an information gathering stage, charged with understanding the business.

    Critically important information needs to be unearthed and, ideally, not one important aspect must be omitted or forgotten. This is the reason why ISO TC 292 (formerly 223), after developing ISO 22301 and ISO 22313, has embarked on developing a standard on the BIA: ISO 22317. It is being presented in another contribution at this conference.

    This webinar also focuses on a visualization and presentation method newly applied to the BIA process - in order to better understand a company’s processes, resources and their interdependencies.
  • One of the critical success factors for any BCM programme is competent people to undertake all the BC roles that the programme requires. This webinar will explain how to plan a campaign of training and awareness to ensure that everyone who has a role in the programme knows what their role is and has the appropriate knowledge and skills to undertake their role.
  • This webinar will consider the complementary disciplines of security, crisis, business continuity and disaster response, blending theoretical and practical applications. It should interest practitioners and students of organizational resilience at advanced levels as it will bind together the various complementary disciplines necessary to become resilient into a single holistic approach. The webinar will aim to develop insights and discussion about how to match the needs of security and risk to the requirements of business continuity and impact management; and to identify the intuitive and learned skills to anticipate, respond to and recover from the many unwanted issues that can arise and threaten organizational capability.

    It will be set in the context of a dynamic, changing world where new threats such as embedded terrorism, social media risk generation, food and logistics security, environmental issues, governance and legislation (as examples) can affect resilience significantly. Many of us look at single elements – this will combine many complementary and potentially conflicting elements in a single analysis and discussion.
  • As managers, we are responsible for recognising the signs of sleep deprivation (yawning, boredom, restlessness, head nodding, poor concentration etc.) and implementing the most appropriate practices to protect our staff from the potential consequences of fatigue.

    We need to acknowledge the impact to our staff, productivity, efficiency, bystanders and work culture if we continue to encourage and push people to operate with little or no sleep.

    In this webinar, Jenny Krasny will delve into the Stigma of Fatigue in more detail to take a look at where we can create big improvements and start to change the fatigue culture.
  • Well-known writer and presenter Nathaniel Forbes MBCI offers three simple steps to help you give more persuasive presentations.

    Whether you’re pitching business continuity management to the C-suite, pleading for your department’s headcount or reporting post-exercise successes, you can move your audience to action with these three steps to a persuasive presentation.

    1.Develop a ‘story’.
    The human brain has been wired for story since our ancestors drew on cave walls. Every disaster, every invocation, every successful recovery reveals stories of sacrifice, personal resilience and individual initiative. Behind the facts, there’s a story in your presentation, too – one your audience will remember.

    2.Make an emotional connection.
    People may forget what you said, they may forget what you did, but they’ll never forget how you made them feel. To move people to action - to make them care about business continuity - you must reach for their feelings. Gently…but intentionally.

    3.Use pictures.
    It’s impossible for anyone to read and listen at the same time. Speaking over text bullets on a screen behind you is distracting and confusing to the audience. Instead, choose powerful images that make your point and support your story. The best ones are often the photographs you take yourself.
  • According to a PwC report “One of the main reasons many banks world over have resisted embracing a customer-centric model is because of integration challenges.”

    The future of most financial institutions depend on the strong connections they forge with customers. The relationship between banks and customers are constantly evolving and they need to adapt and connect in new ways with the customer to remain competitive today and win tomorrow’s customer. Mobile technology and social media are presenting opportunities and challenges to reach out to the customers like never before. While driving customer centric transformation initiatives are important for the bank, it is also extremely critical for the banks to have a strong Run the Bank strategy to drive operational efficiencies and manage cost pressures. Business integration plays a very critical and powerful role in designing and implementing Transform the bank and Run the bank initiatives. Despite the evident dividends banks seem to wrestle with their technology plans and investment decisions.

    In this session, we will address a few effective strategies for banks to address the challenges posed with integrating technology and business and how banks can take the leap towards
    a)Leveraging the strong multichannel interaction and delivering a seamless customer experience
    b)Segmenting consumers dynamically through real-time insights
    c)Tailoring real time offers based on real-time customer data
    d)Run the bank initiatives with focus on efficiencies and cost savings.

    With the right partner and technology expertise, you can deliver seamless banking experience to your customer.
  • Business continuity encompasses a loosely defined set of planning, preparatory and related activities which are intended to ensure that an organization's critical business functions will either continue to operate despite serious incidents or disasters that might otherwise have interrupted them, or will be recovered to an operational state within a reasonably short period. As such, business continuity includes three key elements: 1. Resilience: critical business functions and the supporting infrastructure are designed and engineered in such a way that they are materially unaffected by most disruptions, for example through the use of redundancy and spare capacity; 2. Recovery: arrangements are made to recover or restore critical and less critical business functions that fail for some reason. 3. Contingency: the organization establishes a generalized capability and readiness to cope effectively with whatever major incidents and disasters occur, including those that were not, and perhaps could not have been, foreseen. Contingency preparations constitute a last-resort response if resilience and recovery arrangements should prove inadequate in practice.
  • Root cause analysis (RCA) is a method of problem solving used for identifying the root causes of faults or problems. A factor is considered a root cause if removal thereof from the problem fault-sequence prevents the final undesirable event from recurring; whereas a causal factor is one that affects an event's outcome, but is not a root cause.
  • Reputational risk, often called reputation risk, is a risk of loss resulting from damages to a firm's reputation, in lost revenue; increased operating, capital or regulatory costs; or destruction of shareholder value, consequent to an adverse or potentially criminal event even if the company is not found guilty. Adverse events typically associated with reputation risk include ethics, safety, security, sustainability, quality, and innovation. Reputational risk can be a matter of corporate trust.
  • The focus of this programme is manifold and address the following issues: fostering the use of the tools of risk assessment and risk management in new fields of application such as policy making; providing a platform between the insurance community, the engineering and academic communities and policy makers to discuss risk issues; promoting the concept of the insurability of risks as the natural borderline between State legislation and the market economy; identifying new opportunities for insurers in the emerging sustainability concept in order to enlarge the field of insurable risks
  • In our modern society, computerized or digital control systems have been used to reliably automate many of the industrial operations that we take for granted, from the power plant to the automobiles we drive.
  • Insurance is the equitable transfer of the risk of a loss, from one entity to another in exchange for payment. It is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent, uncertain loss. An insurer, or insurance carrier, is a company selling the insurance; the insured, or policyholder, is the person or entity buying the insurance policy. The amount of money to be charged for a certain amount of insurance coverage is called the premium. Risk management, the practice of appraising and controlling risk, has evolved as a discrete field of study and practice.