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Medicine and Healthcare

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  • While cost is a primary "c" driving the adoption of object-based cloud solutions in the life sciences, compute, capacity, and collaboration may all be bigger incentives. In this webinar, we'll examine how to use an Avere Hybrid Cloud NAS infrastructure to gain big benefits in areas like genomics research, personalized medicine, drug discovery, imaging, and other data analysis applications.

    • Compute - Building production environments in the compute cloud without rewriting existing applications

    • Capacity - Modernizing storage archives and disaster recovery by adding object storage for durability while leveraging existing on-premises NAS

    • Collaboration - Using the cloud t o safely and securely share data globally

    • Cost - Using cloud to lower overall costs to keep pace with fast-growing demands of research initiatives
  • Some of the most critical data required to solve analytical problems in the healthcare and life sciences world lack the type of keys that we rely on so heavily in other domains. This session will focus on solutions to the fundamental data connectivity challenges in this area and how to enable impactful analytics on a few high value but disconnected healthcare data sources.
  • With the emergence of big data healthcare analytics, electronic health information exchange, clinical data warehousing, and other technologies for optimizing patient care, the healthcare industry has never been more reliant on electronic data and the strict requirements associated with the data. The advances in business processes, technology and regulations require that data security initiatives evolve to address new and growing threats. Coincidentally, in a recent survey, 69% of organizations felt that provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) have the effect of increasing or significantly increasing risks to patient privacy and security.

    Chasing compliance is an expensive proposition that doesn’t adequately address the current security threats and vulnerabilities. Organizations that simply want to comply with the regulations are already at risk. A more effective program is risk-based -- one where incremental changes to controls can be made in real-time to more effectively combat current threats to your security program. Join us for this webinar where you’ll learn:

    - Why compliance is an outcome of an effective data protection program.
    - Risk assessment, analysis and management – what’s the difference and why you need them.
    - What is considered ‘reasonable’?
    - What leading healthcare organizations are doing today to protect data, with a focus on securing Big Data for healthcare analytics?
    - How data protection can help without getting in the way of patient care.
    - How do you protect from your healthcare organization public loss of confidence?
  • HealthBridge is a nationally recognized Health Information Exchange based in Cincinnati Ohio that has been in operation since 1997 and is regularly cited as an example of a financial sustainable HIE effort. Rodney Cain, Chief Information Officer will discuss the history and development the HealthBridge with a focus on strategies and lessons learned over the years as the chief technology architect of the HIE effort with an eye to the future and the impacts of HITECH and Meaningful Use.

    HealthBridge has grown to a nationally recognized HIE that includes 24 hospitals and over 5000 physicians in Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky and also provides support via the Collaborative Communities Model to HIEs in Bloomington, Indiana and Springfield, Ohio. HealthBridge was recently selected by the Office of the National Coordinator as one of the initial 32 HIT Regional Extension Centers.

    Rodney is also involved in several HIT standards development processes and HealthBridge is one of the 15 organizations in the ONC Nationwide Health Information Network Collaborative (NHIN) effort.
  • Learn how a community is successfully pursuing health information exchange, interoperability and meaningful use across small and medium practices, hospitals and facilities using a combination of tools, guidance and incentives. This "Roadmap to Meaningful Use" program helps providers realize the quality, efficiency and financial incentives promised in the ARRA Stimulus funding.
  • All great ideas sound “insane” at first. This presentation will describe three insane ideas that Ovum believes will transform healthcare in the future including:
    • Telehealth is for everyone, not just the elderly.
    • Patient self-diagnosis is good and should be promoted.
    • Personal health records are not just a passing trend, they are the solution.
  • Electronic health records may generate a new set of potential healthcare compliance risks and vulnerabilities. The new risk areas, including, the lack of authentication issues, over-documentation and/or cloning, may have significant ramifications beyond billing and coding. Electronic documentation tools offer exciting features designed to enhance communication for most health record users. The use of the system or specific features without appropriate education, training, infrastructure and monitoring may generate data integrity issues, manufactured documentation, increased risk exposure or even undesirable clinical outcomes. This presentation addresses certain areas of concern and discusses potential approaches for detection, evaluation and corrective action.
  • When I tried to move my health data from my hospital to Google Health, what happened was front page news; the transfer was so bad it was covered by the Information Quality Trainwrecks blog. But that doesn't change my conviction one bit: Good quality data, well managed, can vastly empower the new world of doctor-patient collaboration known as Participatory Medicine.

    As an empowered e-patient, a business process analyst and a day-job data geek, in this talk I'll lay out the Society's vision for the role a good EHR can play in creating more efficient - and more effective - healthcare, in ways that benefit providers and patients alike.
  • Clinical groupware is a new and evolving model for the development and deployment of health information technology (HIT) platforms and applications having the following characteristics:
    Use of the Internet and the web for EHR technology.
    Explicit design for information sharing and online communication among providers and patients/consumers.
    A modular or component architecture upon which applications can be aggregated to meet specific clinical and workflow tasks.
    Patient/consumer engagement tools that facilitate ongoing health management and care coordination.
    Interface and data exchange standards for information sharing that emerge in a market-driven manner.
    The Clinical Groupware Collaborative is in a formative stage organization. To date, representatives from over 50 companies have expressed interest. We are working to be formally incorporated in November 2009.

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