Corning Scientific Seminar Series

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Training for Life Science Researchers

The Corning Scientific Seminar Series is a series of free, online technical presentations that provide novel tips, best practices and proven techniques to help advance your research. Delivered by scientists to scientists, these one-hour broadcasts offer useful information and tips for lab technicians and researchers.

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Animal-free, Synthetic Surfaces for Cell Types Relevant in Clinical Research Expansion of stem cells and some primary cells requires either animal-origin components in culture media or coating of the culture vessels with human or animal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. Growing concerns about introducing human and animal-derived pathogens into the culture necessitate the need for animal- free (xeno-free and human-origin components-free) culture environment. Herein, we present defined and synthetic surfaces for cell culture. Corning® PureCoat™ ECM Mimetic cultureware collagen I peptide and fibronectin peptide support culture of cell types requiring collagen I or fibronectin protein -coated surfaces. Corning Synthemax® surface consists of a vitronectin peptide and supports undifferentiated expansion of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs). ECM Mimetic and Synthemax cultureware are pre-coated, synthetic, animal-free, and room temperature stable. Synthemax-SC is available for self-coating.

We demonstrate expansion and functionality of several clinically relevant cell types including hPSCs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), human keratinocytes (HKN), endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs), NPCs and cell lines for biomanufacturing (CHO and Vero) on these surfaces. Corning Synthemax and ECM Mimetic cultureware are versatile surfaces compatible with multiple media for culture of various cell types providing a ready to use alternative to ECM protein coating where animal-free and defined conditions are desirable.
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Apr 24 2014 4:00 pm
UTC
60 mins
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Webinars and videos

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  • SLC transporter-mediated drug–drug interactions (DDI) can significantly impact the pharmacokinetics and safety profiles of drugs. The regulatory agencies (FDA/EMA) recent guidance documents recommend testing six SLC transporters for potential DDI: OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT1, OAT3, OCT1 and OCT2. The 2013 drug transporter white paper published by the International Transporter Consortium (ITC) identified additional drug transporters relevant to drug development, including the Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion SLC transporters: MATE1 and MATE2-K. The webinar will introduce a novel cell-based SLC transporter model system - the recently launched “Corning™ TransportoCells™” - for studying regulatory agency recommended SLC transporters. The new system provides a convenient “thaw and go”, high performing mammalian cell model which supports regulatory agency recommendations for evaluating transporter mediated drug-drug interactions in vitro. In this webinar, we will provide an overview of the product validation and applications for the TransportoCells™ transporter model system. Validation data will also be presented for the newly available MATE1 and MATE2-K Corning™ TransportoCells™.
  • Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments provide structural and biochemical cues for cellular differentiation and functionality. For specialized cell types such as primary cells, a two-dimensional growth substrate may not be sufficient to support complex cellular behaviors such as cell polarity, morphology, signal transduction, and tissue-specific gene expression. This webinar will highlight applications that rely on 3D materials and systems, including Corning ® Matrigel® Matrix (reconstituted basement membrane), Collagen Type I, Corning PuraMatrix™ Peptide Hydrogel, and permeable supports (cell culture inserts). To demonstrate the effectiveness of these environments, the biological and functional properties of a variety of cell types will be discussed.
  • Cancer stem cells (CSCs), commonly referred to as tumor initiating cells (TICs), are thought to be the origin of replicating malignant cells that remain after the primary tumor is removed or eradicated. While the contribution of TICs to cancers of hematopoietic origin is well established, there is a growing body of evidence that supports the presence of TICs within solid tumors. This heterogeneity contributes to the intrinsic resistance of solid tumors to chemotherapeutics and eventually leads to therapeutic failure and patient death. Historically, screening for oncology directed compounds has been performed in 2-dimensional monolayer cultures which fail to replicate the complex architecture and microenvironment of tumors in vivo. To address this need using prototype manufactured 384-well round bottom clear black plates coated with hydrogel (commonly referred to as ultra-low attachment or ULA plates) we have developed a method to generate single cell type spheroids to accommodate their use in high throughput screening. These cultures were systematically compared to spheres grown in conventional plates and comparative imaging analyses were carried out to assess sphere formation. In addition, using the same plates, we have developed multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) composed of various cell types cultured in the same well. Differences in the cellular compositions of these spheroids in response to drugs can be quantified using high content imagers such as the WiScan from Idea-Bio and the High Throughput Flow Cytometer from IntelliCyt. These heterotypic, differentially labeled spheroids are a valuable asset in the generation of cell-based HTS assays capable of identifying molecules that selectively kill TICs and the cells comprising their microenvironment.
  • During the past decade, the significant role of transporters in drug disposition and safety has been strengthened due to the increasing evidence of transporter mediated drug-drug interaction (DDI). Regulatory agencies recommend evaluating specific drug transporters of emerging importance in drug development. Appropriate in vitro characterization of drug interactions with these transporters facilitates decision-making and development of appropriate clinical plans in drug development. Corning Life Sciences have recently developed a novel SLC transporter model to help the pharmaceutical industry address regulatory guidance in a fast and easy manner. In this webinar, we will provide an overview of the product validation and applications for the recently launched TransportoCells™ cryopreserved SLC transporter model.
  • During the past decade, increasing clinical evidence of transporter mediated drug-drug interaction (DDI) has highlighted the significant role transporters play in drug disposition and safety. Regulatory authorities recommend evaluating specific drug transporters of emerging importance during drug development, including SLC and ABC transporters. ABC transporters are more challenging to study because they are usually expressed on the apical side of cell membrane (i.e., ATP and substrate binding sites facing inside of the cell), which can limit the direct access of compounds to the transporters in the absence of a relevant uptake transport mechanism. It is critical to utilize an appropriate in vitro system to evaluate drug interactions with these transporters in order to gain better insight into the mechanisms of transporter mediated drug disposition and elimination.

    Corning Life Sciences offers a broad spectrum of in vitro models to support drug transporter studies. This webinar will provide an overview of in vitro ABC transporter models, as well as the pros and cons of each model in deciphering drug ADME features.
  • In the third part of our three lecture series on cell culture contamination, we will focus on everyday management of cell culture contamination. We will discuss how to reduce cell culture accidents by using good aseptic technique, the importance of freeze stocks, and how to appropriately monitor for contamination. We will also learn how to track down the source of contamination to prevent future accidents.
  • In vitro cell migration and invasion assays are frequently used as model systems for studying the directed movement of cells towards a chemoattractant stimulus, or to determine how a particular drug, growth factor or extra cellular matrix coating affects that movement. The classic method used to analyze this movement, the Boyden chamber, can be time-consuming, labor-intensive, and subjective.
    An improved version of this technology was developed, Corning FluoroBlok. As cells migrate or invade through a fluorescence blocking membrane, they are detected using a bottom-reading microplate reader or inverted fluorescence microscope. Cells remaining in the upper chamber of the insert are shielded from detection, allowing for quantitation of cell numbers in this homogeneous assay system.
    Recommended uses of the FluoroBlok system as well as recent improvements will be reviewed in this seminar.
  • Studies have shown that at least 20% of the animal cell cultures currently in existence are contaminated by either microorganisms or other cell lines. This three part live, on-line seminar series will review the scope of this major problem, examine some of its causes, and discuss techniques for avoiding contamination. It will also explore some key, simple strategies to monitor for contamination and prevent losses through careful culture management.

    This webinar will specifically focus on aseptic technique: developing a practical approach to aseptic technique; reducing day-to-day contamination problems in the lab; and helpful hints for avoiding contamination.
  • Expansion of stem cells and some primary cells requires either animal-origin components in culture media or coating of the culture vessels with human or animal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. Growing concerns about introducing human and animal-derived pathogens into the culture necessitate the need for animal- free (xeno-free and human-origin components-free) culture environment. Herein, we present defined and synthetic surfaces for cell culture. Corning® PureCoat™ ECM Mimetic cultureware collagen I peptide and fibronectin peptide support culture of cell types requiring collagen I or fibronectin protein -coated surfaces. Corning Synthemax® surface consists of a vitronectin peptide and supports undifferentiated expansion of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs). ECM Mimetic and Synthemax cultureware are pre-coated, synthetic, animal-free, and room temperature stable. Synthemax-SC is available for self-coating.

    We demonstrate expansion and functionality of several clinically relevant cell types including hPSCs (human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells), MSCs, human keratinocytes (HKN), endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs), NPCs and cell lines for bio manufacturing (CHO and Vero) on these surfaces. Corning Synthemax and ECM mimetic cultureware are versatile surfaces compatible with multiple media for culture of various cell types providing a ready to use alternative to ECM coating where animal-free and defined conditions are desirable.
  • Recent studies have shown that at least 20% of the animal cell cultures currently in use in the US are contaminated by either microorganisms or other cell lines. This three part live, on-line seminar series will review the scope of this major problem and examine some of its causes and techniques for avoiding it. It will also explore some key, easy to employ strategies for preventing these losses by careful culture management.

    This webinar will discuss good aseptic technique: developing a practical approach to aseptic technique; reducing day-to-day contamination problems in the lab; and helpful hints for avoiding contamination.

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