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SNIA Webcasts

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  • Long-term Data Retention: Challenges, Standards and Best Practices Long-term Data Retention: Challenges, Standards and Best Practices Simona Rabinovici-Cohen, IBM, Phillip Viana, IBM, Sam Fineberg Recorded: Feb 16 2017 61 mins
    The demand for digital data preservation has increased drastically in recent years. Maintaining a large amount of data for long periods of time (months, years, decades, or even forever) becomes even more important given government regulations such as HIPAA, Sarbanes-Oxley, OSHA, and many others that define specific preservation periods for critical records.

    While the move from paper to digital information over the past decades has greatly improved information access, it complicates information preservation. This is due to many factors including digital format changes, media obsolescence, media failure, and loss of contextual metadata. The Self-contained Information Retention Format (SIRF) was created by SNIA to facilitate long-term data storage and preservation. SIRF can be used with disk, tape, and cloud based storage containers, and is extensible to any new storage technologies. It provides an effective and efficient way to preserve and secure digital information for many decades, even with the ever-changing technology landscape.
Join this webcast to learn:
    •Key challenges of long-term data retention
    •How the SIRF format works and its key elements
    •How SIRF supports different storage containers - disks, tapes, CDMI and the cloud
    •Availability of Open SIRF

    SNIA experts that developed the SIRF standard will be on hand to answer your questions.
  • Everything You Wanted To Know about Storage But Were Too Proud To Ask: Buffering Everything You Wanted To Know about Storage But Were Too Proud To Ask: Buffering John Kim & Rob Davis, Mellanox, Mark Rogov, Dell EMC, Dave Minturn, Intel Recorded: Feb 14 2017 64 mins
    Buffers, Queues, and Caches, oh my! Buffers and Queues are part of every data center architecture, and a critical part of performance – both in improving it as well as hindering it. A well-implemented buffer can mean the difference between a finely run system and a confusing nightmare of troubleshooting. Knowing how buffers and queues work in storage can help make your storage system shine.

    However, there is something of a mystique surrounding these different data center components, as many people don’t realize just how they’re used and why. In this pod of the “Too Proud To Ask” series, we’re going to be demystifying this very important aspect of data center storage. You’ll learn:

    •What are buffers, caches, and queues, and why you should care about the differences?
    •What’s the difference between a read cache and a write cache?
    •What does “queue depth” mean?
    •What’s a buffer, a ring buffer, and host memory buffer, and why does it matter?
    •What happens when things go wrong?

    These are just some of the topics we’ll be covering, and while it won’t be exhaustive look at buffers, caches and queues, you can be sure that you’ll get insight into this very important, and yet often overlooked, part of storage design.
  • Introduction to Swordfish: Scalable Storage Management Introduction to Swordfish: Scalable Storage Management Richelle Ahlvers, Chair, SNIA Scalable Storage Mgt Technical Work Group, Principal, Storage Management Architect, Broadcom Recorded: Jan 24 2017 59 mins
    The SNIA Swordfish™ specification helps to provide a unified approach for the management of storage and servers in hyperscale and cloud infrastructure environments, making it easier for IT administrators to integrate scalable solutions into their data centers. Created by SNIA’s Scalable Storage Management Technical Work Group (SSM TWG), SNIA Swordfish builds on the Distributed Management Task Force’s (DMTF’s) Redfish specification using the same easy-to-use RESTful methods and lightweight JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) formatting. This session will present an overview of SNIA Swordfish including the new functionality added in version 1.1 released in January 2017.
  • NVDIMM - Applications are Here NVDIMM - Applications are Here SNIA NVDIMM Special Interest Group Recorded: Jan 10 2017 60 mins
    Get a glimpse of the future of Persistent Memory - it's NOW! Join SNIA NVDIMM Special Interest Group in another in our series of webcasts on the NVDIMM Cookbook - how to incorporate NVDIMM into your systems and what non-volatile DIMM applications now available. We'll even highlight some of the "knobs" to turn to optimize use of NVDIMM in your applications to ease the way to simple, plug-n-play adoption!
  • Containers: Best Practices and Data Management Services Containers: Best Practices and Data Management Services Keith Hudgins, Tech Alliances, Docker, Andrew Sullivan, Tech Marketing Engineer, NetApp, Alex McDonald, Chair SNIA-CSI Recorded: Dec 7 2016 57 mins
    Now that you have become acquainted with basic container technologies and the associated storage challenges in supporting applications running within containers in production; let’s take a deeper dive into what differentiates this technology from what you are used to with virtual machines. Containers can both complement virtual machines and also replace them as they promise the ability to scale exponentially higher. They can easily be ported from one physical server to another or to one platform—such as on-premise—to another—such as public cloud providers like Amazon AWS. In this Webcast, we’ll explore “container best practices” that discuss how to address the various challenges around networking, security and logging. We’ll also look at what types of applications more easily lend themselves to a microservice architecture versus which applications may require additional investment to refactor/re-architect to take advantage of microservices.
  • 2017 Ethernet Roadmap for Networked Storage 2017 Ethernet Roadmap for Networked Storage Brad Booth, Microsoft, Brad Smith, Mellanox, Vittal Balasubramanian, Dell, Fred Zhang, Intel, John Kim, Mellanox Recorded: Dec 1 2016 60 mins
    When the SNIA Ethernet Storage Forum (ESF) last looked at the Ethernet Roadmap for Networked Storage in 2015, we anticipated a world of rapid change. The list of advances in 2016 is nothing short of amazing:

    •New adapters, switches, and cables have been launched supporting 25, 50, and 100Gb Ethernet speeds including support from major server vendors and storage startups
    •Multiple vendors have added or updated support for RDMA over Ethernet
    •The growth of NVMe flash and release of the NVMe over Fabrics standard are driving demand for both faster speeds and lower latency in networking
    •The growth of cloud, virtualization, hyper-converged infrastructure, object storage, and containers are all increasing the popularity of Ethernet as a storage fabric

    The world of Ethernet in 2017 promises more of the same. Now we revisit the topic with a look ahead at what’s in store for Ethernet in 2017. With all the incredible advances and learning vectors, SNIA ESF is here to help you keep up. Here’s some of the things to keep track of in the upcoming year:
    •Learn what is driving the adoption of faster Ethernet speeds and new Ethernet storage models
    •Understand the different copper and optical cabling choices available at different speeds and distances
    •Debate how other connectivity options will compete against Ethernet for the new cloud and software-defined storage networks
    •And finally look ahead with us at what Ethernet is planning for new connectivity options and faster speeds such as 200 and 400 Gigabit Ethernet

    The momentum is strong with Ethernet, and we’re here to help you keep on top of the lightning-fast changes. Come join us to look at the future of Ethernet for storage and join the SNIA ESF webcast on December 1st register here.
  • Current State of Storage in the Container World Current State of Storage in the Container World Eric Forgette, Technical Director, Nimble Storage, Chad Hintz, SNIA-ESF Board, Cisco Recorded: Nov 17 2016 58 mins
    The first wave of adoption of container technology was focused on micro services and ephemeral workloads. The next wave of adoption won’t be possible without persistent, shared storage. This webcast will provide an overview of Docker containers and the inherent challenge of persistence when containerizing traditional enterprise applications. We will then examine the different storage solutions available for solving these challenges and provide the pros and cons of each.

    In this webcast we will cover
    •Overview of Containers
    ◦Quick history, where we are now
    ◦Virtual machines vs. Containers
    ◦How Docker containers work
    ◦Why containers are compelling for customers
    ◦Challenges
    ◦Storage
    •Storage Options for Containers
    ◦NAS vs. SAN
    ◦Persistent and non-persistent
    •Future Considerations
    ◦Opportunities for future work

    This webcast should appeal to those interested in understanding the basics of containers and how it relates to the storage used with containers.
  • The Magic and Mystery of In-Memory Apps The Magic and Mystery of In-Memory Apps Shaun Walsh, SNIA SSSI Member and Managing Partner G2M Communications; Marty Foltyn, SNIA Business Development, Moderator Recorded: Nov 8 2016 60 mins
    Businesses are extracting value from more data, more sources and at increasingly real-time rates. Spark and HANA are just the beginning. This webcast details existing and emerging solutions for in-memory computing solutions that address this market trend and the disruptions that happen when combining big-data (Petabytes) with in-memory/real-time requirements., It provides an overview and trade-offs of key solutions (Hadoop/Spark, Tachyon, Hana, NoSQL-in-memory, etc) and related infrastructure (DRAM, Nand, 3D-crosspoint, NV-DIMMs, high-speed networking) and discusses the disruption to infrastructure design and operations when "tiered-memory" replaces "tiered storage"
  • Everything You Wanted To Know About Storage But Were Too Proud To Ask/Mauve Everything You Wanted To Know About Storage But Were Too Proud To Ask/Mauve Fred Knight, NetApp, John Kim, Mellanox, Chad Hintz, Cisco, Dror Goldenberg, Mellanox, J Metz, Cisco Recorded: Nov 1 2016 51 mins
    In this part of the series, “Everything You Wanted To Know about Storage But Were Too Proud To Ask,” we’re going to be focusing on the network aspect of storage systems.

    As with any technical field, it’s too easy to dive into the jargon of the pieces and expect people to know exactly what you mean. Unfortunately, some of the terms may have alternative meanings in other areas of technology. In this Webcast, we look at some of those terms specifically and discuss them as they relate to storage networking systems.

    In particular, you’ll find out what we mean when we talk about:

    •Channel versus Busses
    •Control Plane versus Data Plane
    •Fabric versus Network

    For people who are familiar with Data Center Technology, whether it be Compute, Programming, or even Storage itself, some of these concepts may seem intuitive and obvious… until you start talking to people who are really into this stuff. This series of Webcasts will help be your Secret Decoder Ring to unlock the mysteries of what is going on when you hear these conversations.
  • Clustered File Systems: No Limits Clustered File Systems: No Limits John Kim, SNIA-ESF Chair, James Coomer, DDN, Alex McDonald, SNIA-ESF Vice Chair Recorded: Oct 25 2016 64 mins
    Today's storage world would appear to have been divided into three major and mutually exclusive categories: block, file and object storage. Much of the marketing that shapes much of the user demand would appear to suggest that these are three quite distinct animals, and many systems are sold as exclusively either SAN for block, NAS for file or object. And object is often conflated with cloud, a consumption model that can in reality be block, file or object.

    But a fixed taxonomy that divides the storage world this way is very limiting, and can be confusing; for instance, when we talk about cloud. How should providers and users buy and consume their storage? Are there other classifications that might help in providing storage solutions to meet specific or more general application needs?

    This webcast will explore clustered storage solutions that not only provide multiple end users access to shared storage over a network, but allow the storage itself to be distributed and managed over multiple discrete storage systems. In this webcast, we’ll discuss:
    •General principles and specific clustered and distributed systems and the facilities they provide built on the underlying storage
    •Better known file systems like NFS, GPFS and Lustre along with a few of the less well known
    •How object based systems like S3 have blurred the lines between them and traditional file based solutions.

    This webcast should appeal to those interested in exploring some of the different ways of accessing & managing storage, and how that might affect how storage systems are provisioned and consumed. POSIX and other acronyms may be mentioned, but no rocket science beyond a general understanding of the principles of storage will be assumed. Contains no nuts and is suitable for vegans!

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