Why Water Is A Critical Business Issue

William Sarni, Director, Enterprise Water Strategy, Deloitte Consulting LLP
An overview of facts and trends regarding water scarcity, current issues and trends for business regarding water risk and opportunities and “new rules” for thinking about water as critical business issue. A perspective on how to build a global water stewardship strategy and key aspects of a successful global program will be presented.
Apr 21 2011
21 mins
Why Water Is A Critical Business Issue
More from this community:

Water Management

Webinars and videos

  • Live and recorded (37)
  • Upcoming (0)
  • Date
  • Rating
  • Views
  • Legislation will be the key driver for the ballast water treatment systems (BWTS) market globally with significant developments that include the expected ratification of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) convention in 2014. Furthermore, the recent acceptance of the IMO convention by Germany, raising the dead weight tonnage to 30.3 percent; support from the United States Coast Guard (USCG) legislation, Alternate Management System (AMS); and other national legislation's are sustaining the demand for BWTS installations.

    Why You Should Attend:
    · Get insights on the market growth and structure post-ratification of the IMO Convention
    · Learn the strengths of AMS and the USCG regulations, and their impact on the current market scenario
    · Identify current technologies that can potentially conquer the market, along with key insights on the competitive structure and statistics on the current addressable market
    · Learn about ship owners’ preferences to consider retrofitting options prior to ratification and what key industry challenges the equipment suppliers face
  • A significant push has been witnessed from governments, suppliers and service providers to make our cities "smart." This calls for several key elements to come together cohesively and profitably to make smart cities a long-term value proposition for all involved.

    This briefing will delve into the issues, challenges, and success factors that need to be evaluated in implementing smart city plans.
  • The analyst briefing will discuss:
    - The latest global activities in waste upcycling
    - Nine dimensions of waste upcycling technologies and insights on the roadmap and penetration prospects of these technologies
    - An overview of the anticipated value chain after five years in this technology domain
  • With the one year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy fast approaching in October, municipal water and wastewater utilities in North America are surprisingly no further ahead in their preparations for similar major wet weather events. This briefing will investigate the infrastructure challenges related to storm water management, and the short- and long-term implications of some of these initiatives.

    Webinar highlights:
    •New treatment technologies and system management solutions used to address these issues
    •Regional regulations under development to evoke long-term changes
    •The industry challenges related to infrastructure spending
    •Short- and long-term infrastructure initiatives related to major wet weather events
  • Why you should attend this webinar:

    •Understand the issues associated with oil and gas exploration
    •Gain a realistic understanding of the growth opportunities for drilling
    •Recognize the future for water treatment companies in the United States oil and gas industry
    •Learn more about one of the most talked about industries in North America
  • This session was conceived as a way to acknowledge the 10th anniversary of the Water Conservation Showcase and will be structured as a panel discussion. The intention of the session is to take a quick look back at the status of water conservation from ten years ago when the first showcase was held, consider some of the most successful conservation efforts that are active today and explore how utilities will address water management in the future. The presentation will focus on current and emerging approaches toward providing water management services and tools to assist water customers in managing their own water use. These tools are applicable to existing customers as well as new development to maximize cost-effective water efficiency benefits.

    The panelists are from four of the most innovative and ambitious water utilities in California: Julie Ortiz of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC), Richard Harris of the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD), Bill McDonald of the Metropolitan Water District, and Chris Dundon of the Contra Costa Water District. Each panelist will provide a brief presentation on their perspective of the past, present and future of water conservation. The bulk of the session will be set aside for what promises to be a lively discussion.
  • It is zero hour for a new US water policy! At a time when many countries are adopting new national approaches to water management, the United States still has no cohesive federal policy, and water-related authorities are dispersed across more than 30 agencies. Here, at last, is a vision for what we as a nation need to do to manage our most vital resource. In this book, leading thinkers at world-class water research institution the Pacific Institute present clear and readable analysis and recommendations for a new federal water policy to confront our national and global challenges at a critical time.

    What exactly is at stake? In the 21st century, pressures on water resources in the United States are growing and conflicts among water users are worsening. Communities continue to struggle to meet water quality standards and to ensure that safe drinking water is available for all. And new challenges are arising as climate change and extreme events worsen, new water quality threats materialize, and financial constraints grow. Yet the United States has not stepped up with adequate leadership to address these problems.

    The inability of national policymakers to safeguard our water makes the United States increasingly vulnerable to serious disruptions of something most of us take for granted: affordable, reliable, and safe water. This book provides an independent assessment of water issues and water management in the United States, addressing emerging and persistent water challenges from the perspectives of science, public policy, environmental justice, economics, and law. With fascinating case studies and first-person accounts of what helps and hinders good water management, this is a clear-eyed look at what we need for a 21st century U.S. water policy.
  • This session will focus on the completed projects of two design firms. These case studies will highlight the innovative solutions that both firms deploy in their efforts to reduce fresh water use and waste-water run-off. The panelists are Lisa Petterson of SERA Architects Inc. and Jeffrey Miller of Miller Company Landscape Architects. The specific projects they will present are described below. Each panelist will share how water conservation measures where achieved in their projects, the measured impact of these solutions and lessons-learned that impacted their future work. The session will end with questions from attendees.

    In 2008, SERA Architects was commissioned to design a high-rise multi-family development to meet the then newly released Living Building Challenge Standard. The team recognized that Net Zero Water would be particularly challenging due to the water needs of a residential building. We applied for a grant to identify regulatory barriers project teams would face when creating Living Buildings. In the undertaking, we found ourselves doing more than just identifying barriers. Ultimately the team’s work resulted in passage of three alternate methods to the state building code and a house bill which legalized the use of rainwater and graywater in Oregon. As a result of these policy changes, the team is celebrating completion of one of the largest rainwater collection projects in Oregon and is now designing what will be one of the largest rainwater-to-potable systems ever built.

    Miller Company Landscape Architects is an award-winning landscape architecture firm located in San Francisco. Case study projects illustrated in this presentation include over 20 green school yards the firm has designed and built in San Francisco. These projects include independent and public schools commissioned by SFUSD, SFPUC and include edible and native gardens, rainwater catchment systems and educational components.
  • The first portion of the session will be a presentation of the results of a joint ACEEE/AWE Report, Tackling the Nexus: Exemplary Programs that Save Both Energy and Water, which identifies and recognizes the most successful programs that seek both energy and water savings, and chronicles these programs so that others can learn from them. The results of this research include case studies of each award winning programs and an overall synthesis and discussion of the research, including key common characteristics of the best practice programs, recommendations for successful programs, and useful lessons learned. It presents best practice ideas and lessons learned for next-generation customer energy and water efficiency programs, along with concrete examples of successful program implementation. This session will cover the water-energy nexus, the methodology of the report, the winning programs and best practice results and challenges discovered from the research.

    The second portion of the session will be presented by Joe Castro. Joe is one of the winning program administrators and will present on the details of his program, The City of Boulder Colorado's Energy Performance Contracting Program, including the motivation for creating the program, program design, program performance and lessons learned.

    The third portion of the session will be presented by Loraine White. Loraine was an expert panelist and helped determine the winning programs that were included in the report described above. Loraine will speak to the water-energy nexus in greater detail and draw on her years of work in this field and expertise.
  • Generating electricity requires significant quantities of water, primarily for cooling. This demand can be particularly challenging at a local level representing in many cases a community’s single largest consumer. In addition, wastewater from these facilities can have a significant impact on water quality within a region as well. Since 2003, the California Energy Commission evaluated new power plant proposals based on policies that encourage the use of degraded water supplies rather than fresh water by power facilities and where feasible, use zero liquid discharge systems to eliminate wastewater impacts. In addition, efforts to significantly increase the efficiency of water used by power facilities as resulted in significant reductions in overall water demand by new facilities as compared to older plants. This course will explore the water dependencies and efficiency opportunities associated with power plants and the policies that now govern this relationship in California.
  • Channel
  • Channel profile
Up Down
  • Past, Present and Future of Water Conservation: a Water Utility Panel Recorded: Mar 19 2013 68 mins
    This session was conceived as a way to acknowledge the 10th anniversary of the Water Conservation Showcase and will be structured as a panel discussion. The intention of the session is to take a quick look back at the status of water conservation from ten years ago when the first showcase was held, consider some of the most successful conservation efforts that are active today and explore how utilities will address water management in the future. The presentation will focus on current and emerging approaches toward providing water management services and tools to assist water customers in managing their own water use. These tools are applicable to existing customers as well as new development to maximize cost-effective water efficiency benefits.

    The panelists are from four of the most innovative and ambitious water utilities in California: Julie Ortiz of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC), Richard Harris of the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD), Bill McDonald of the Metropolitan Water District, and Chris Dundon of the Contra Costa Water District. Each panelist will provide a brief presentation on their perspective of the past, present and future of water conservation. The bulk of the session will be set aside for what promises to be a lively discussion.
  • A Twenty-First Century U.S. Water Policy Recorded: Mar 19 2013 56 mins
    It is zero hour for a new US water policy! At a time when many countries are adopting new national approaches to water management, the United States still has no cohesive federal policy, and water-related authorities are dispersed across more than 30 agencies. Here, at last, is a vision for what we as a nation need to do to manage our most vital resource. In this book, leading thinkers at world-class water research institution the Pacific Institute present clear and readable analysis and recommendations for a new federal water policy to confront our national and global challenges at a critical time.

    What exactly is at stake? In the 21st century, pressures on water resources in the United States are growing and conflicts among water users are worsening. Communities continue to struggle to meet water quality standards and to ensure that safe drinking water is available for all. And new challenges are arising as climate change and extreme events worsen, new water quality threats materialize, and financial constraints grow. Yet the United States has not stepped up with adequate leadership to address these problems.

    The inability of national policymakers to safeguard our water makes the United States increasingly vulnerable to serious disruptions of something most of us take for granted: affordable, reliable, and safe water. This book provides an independent assessment of water issues and water management in the United States, addressing emerging and persistent water challenges from the perspectives of science, public policy, environmental justice, economics, and law. With fascinating case studies and first-person accounts of what helps and hinders good water management, this is a clear-eyed look at what we need for a 21st century U.S. water policy.
  • Water Conservation Case Study Session #1: West Coast Innovation Recorded: Mar 19 2013 69 mins
    This session will focus on the completed projects of two design firms. These case studies will highlight the innovative solutions that both firms deploy in their efforts to reduce fresh water use and waste-water run-off. The panelists are Lisa Petterson of SERA Architects Inc. and Jeffrey Miller of Miller Company Landscape Architects. The specific projects they will present are described below. Each panelist will share how water conservation measures where achieved in their projects, the measured impact of these solutions and lessons-learned that impacted their future work. The session will end with questions from attendees.

    In 2008, SERA Architects was commissioned to design a high-rise multi-family development to meet the then newly released Living Building Challenge Standard. The team recognized that Net Zero Water would be particularly challenging due to the water needs of a residential building. We applied for a grant to identify regulatory barriers project teams would face when creating Living Buildings. In the undertaking, we found ourselves doing more than just identifying barriers. Ultimately the team’s work resulted in passage of three alternate methods to the state building code and a house bill which legalized the use of rainwater and graywater in Oregon. As a result of these policy changes, the team is celebrating completion of one of the largest rainwater collection projects in Oregon and is now designing what will be one of the largest rainwater-to-potable systems ever built.

    Miller Company Landscape Architects is an award-winning landscape architecture firm located in San Francisco. Case study projects illustrated in this presentation include over 20 green school yards the firm has designed and built in San Francisco. These projects include independent and public schools commissioned by SFUSD, SFPUC and include edible and native gardens, rainwater catchment systems and educational components.
  • Tackling the Nexus: Exemplary Programs that Save Both Energy and Water Recorded: Mar 19 2013 65 mins
    The first portion of the session will be a presentation of the results of a joint ACEEE/AWE Report, Tackling the Nexus: Exemplary Programs that Save Both Energy and Water, which identifies and recognizes the most successful programs that seek both energy and water savings, and chronicles these programs so that others can learn from them. The results of this research include case studies of each award winning programs and an overall synthesis and discussion of the research, including key common characteristics of the best practice programs, recommendations for successful programs, and useful lessons learned. It presents best practice ideas and lessons learned for next-generation customer energy and water efficiency programs, along with concrete examples of successful program implementation. This session will cover the water-energy nexus, the methodology of the report, the winning programs and best practice results and challenges discovered from the research.

    The second portion of the session will be presented by Joe Castro. Joe is one of the winning program administrators and will present on the details of his program, The City of Boulder Colorado's Energy Performance Contracting Program, including the motivation for creating the program, program design, program performance and lessons learned.

    The third portion of the session will be presented by Loraine White. Loraine was an expert panelist and helped determine the winning programs that were included in the report described above. Loraine will speak to the water-energy nexus in greater detail and draw on her years of work in this field and expertise.
  • Power Plants – Curbing the Thirst Recorded: Mar 19 2013 67 mins
    Generating electricity requires significant quantities of water, primarily for cooling. This demand can be particularly challenging at a local level representing in many cases a community’s single largest consumer. In addition, wastewater from these facilities can have a significant impact on water quality within a region as well. Since 2003, the California Energy Commission evaluated new power plant proposals based on policies that encourage the use of degraded water supplies rather than fresh water by power facilities and where feasible, use zero liquid discharge systems to eliminate wastewater impacts. In addition, efforts to significantly increase the efficiency of water used by power facilities as resulted in significant reductions in overall water demand by new facilities as compared to older plants. This course will explore the water dependencies and efficiency opportunities associated with power plants and the policies that now govern this relationship in California.
  • Art of Stormwater Recorded: Mar 19 2013 45 mins
    From the beginning, water has been at the center of our lives. We choose to live by it, harness its energy, and certainly depend upon it for sustenance. Historically we collect our stormwater and whisk it away in the most expedient and efficient manner never stopping to consider its ability to make additional contributions. Over the last few decades and with increasing frequency, stormwater has been treated as the important resource it presents. Designers and artists, together with engineers and agencies are looking to celebrate stormwater’s presence in our communities through creative expression, interpretation, and the visible additions of green infrastructure. There are inspiring examples from around the world to motivate us to join efforts with our colleagues and our communities to make an impact and to celebrate water.
  • Why Water Is A Critical Business Issue Recorded: Apr 21 2011 21 mins
    An overview of facts and trends regarding water scarcity, current issues and trends for business regarding water risk and opportunities and “new rules” for thinking about water as critical business issue. A perspective on how to build a global water stewardship strategy and key aspects of a successful global program will be presented.
  • An Operational Framework for Business Engagement w/ Water Policy Recorded: Apr 21 2011 39 mins
    A number of recent global trends are threatening the quantity, quality, reliability, and affordability of water resources and water services, creating risk for business and government alike. In response, companies invest in operational efficiencies, site their facilities in locations that can provide for adequate and reliable sources of water, and are increasingly working with their suppliers to improve water management practices.

    However, these “internal” solutions are limited in mitigating the full range of water-related business risks, as many risks stem from external factors largely established by the public sector and controlled through public policy. Public water policy, unfortunately, can be wasteful, uninformed, inadequately enforced, under-funded, and at worst corrupt and negligent of its social and commercial responsibilities. As such, there is a strong business case for companies engaging with the public sector in order to strengthen water policy, facilitate its effective implementation, and ultimately advance sustainable water management.

    This presentation will outline an operational framework for effective policy engagement that will highlight how companies can assess watershed conditions, develop an engagement strategy, and implement it effectively. This framework will be illustrated by a series of case studies.
  • Engaging Communities for Water Management Recorded: Apr 23 2010 30 mins
    When it comes to the management of water resources, people are at the center of the debate, both in our capacity to implement strong governance systems and in our ability to ensure that those systems support individuals’ rights to access the resource. This presentation draws on the best of BSR’s water-related stakeholder engagement projects with companies in the agriculture, pharmaceuticals, bottled water industries and water utilities, and highlights the challenges and opportunities in engaging a broad variety of individuals and organizations in sustainable water resources management.
  • Growing Enough Food Without Enough Water Recorded: Apr 23 2010 37 mins
    Water scarcity is a reality for about 1/3 of the world’s population. Driving increasing water scarcity is the way we manage water for food. Projections indicate that a growing, wealthier population may need as much as 70% more food by 2050. With water scarcity already posing a constraint to food production in many areas of the world, a major question is whether we have enough water to grow enough food. In fact, it is not the amount of water that is lacking globally. Rather we are lacking in good management of water and land resources. Finding solutions will require a different set of thinking and actions moving forward. Water scarcity has brought about a new set of problems that require new solutions.

    The presentation and discussion will cover water scarcity and drivers of water use within and outside the water sector and include climate change; it will ask how much more water will be needed to grow enough food; then it will provide a direction for finding solutions to future water and food problems.

    David Molden is Deputy Director General for Research at the International Water Management Institute (IWMI). He has a PhD, specializing in groundwater hydrology and irrigation, and has broader interests in integrating social, technical and environmental aspects of water management. Recently, David coordinated a global program involving over 700 participants to produce a Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture, with results documented in the publication Water for Food, Water for Life (http://www.iwmi.cgiar.org/Assessment/). David was presented with the CGIAR Outstanding Scientist Award.
  • Mitigating Water Risks Through Policy Engagement Recorded: Apr 21 2010 42 mins
    Mitigating Water Risks Through Policy Engagement
  • Saving Water (and Money!) in Manufacturing and the Supply Chain Recorded: Apr 21 2010 38 mins
    PepsiCo’s four-stage ReCon (resource conservation) program focuses on understanding energy and water use at the plant level and beyond. The first stage of ReCon focuses on understanding resource utilization at the plant level. The ReCon toolkit includes a Water Profiler, which identifies and quantifies major water users and their associated costs. Another component of the toolkit is an online Diagnostic, which determines whether best practices are being followed. The Profiler and Diagnostic are used together to identify and prioritize conservation projects.

    ReCon Water was introduced at six PepsiCo-owned manufacturing sites and one supply chain partner site in 2009. The savings opportunities identified at those sites totaled over one billion liters of water, corresponding to energy and water savings of nearly $725,000.

    This presentation will describe the ReCon process and the ReCon Water toolkit, as well as examples of the savings found at snack and beverage plants.
  • The Business Case for Pursuing Water Sustainability Recorded: Apr 21 2010 45 mins
    Water sustainability has climbed high on the corporate agenda as water scarcity and declining quality are growing problems that affect businesses globally. Many industrial sectors are water-intensive and water is a key component of their products and process. Drawing from the extensive ERM experience in supporting clients from different sectors in assessing their water footprint, addressing water- related business risks and opportunities, and ultimately creating water sustainability strategies, this session will present the business case for pursuing water sustainability. The session will provide a multi sector review of business challenges, value proposition, critical success factors, and solutions for achieving water sustainability in a business context.
  • IBM Vermont Case Study: Data Driven Water Management Recorded: Apr 21 2010 45 mins
    IBM Vermont is a large semiconductor manufacturing site which consumes 3.2 million gallons per day of water. The management goals are quality, reliability, cost control and environmental stewardship. The operation of the site’s many water systems use extensive amounts of data and automated data analysis to meet the aforementioned goals. IBM’s Advanced Data Management techniques have supported nearly a decade of sustained improvements in water management. Statistical Process Control (SPC) applications have been built which extract data to provide convenient process control of hundreds of key process indicators. These data management techniques employed by IBM allow for a continuous stream of improvement projects.
  • Water Neutrality:Global Water Stewardship for Largest Beverage Co Recorded: Apr 21 2010 40 mins
    Water is the main ingredient in all of The Coca-Cola Company's beverages and is essential to its manufacturing processes. Water also has broad implications for the company’s supply chain as a key component in the production of sugar, citrus, coffee and other ingredients. It is also vital to the sustainability of the communities that the company serves. Reducing water scarcity, enhancing water quality and addressing the water needs of local communities are direct and vital business concerns.

    Over the last ten years, the company's evolution in water stewardship has been significant: from a major reputation crisis in 2002 involving communities and government authorities in southern India to a 2007 call for corporate “water neutrality,” TCCC has developed and continues to evolve one of the more sophisticated water stewardship programs in the private sector.

    However, true sustainability as it relates to water will involve more than “neutralizing” the volume of water that the company uses. This is because fluctuations in the amount and quality of water available to a given community or ecosystem play an important role in sustaining the diversity and proper functioning of river ecosystems and watersheds.

    This presentation will profile Coca-Cola's experience over the past ten years providing a glimpse into the company’s commitments and an appreciation of the complexity of true water stewardship:

    • Plant performance (water use efficiency, water quality, wastewater treatment)
    • Watershed protection (source assessment and protection)
    • Sustainable communities (helping enable access to clean drinking water and sanitation)
    • Global awareness and action (helping mobilize the international community to drive global awareness and action to address water challenges)
  • First Stop on the Road to Corporate Water Reporting: Measurement Recorded: Apr 21 2010 43 mins
    Water is used to make every product on Earth, and so all businesses, and all sectors, depend on it in some way. People are becoming more aware of water concerns and how it is allocated. Increasingly the spotlight is being cast on business, one of the world’s most significant users of water. Even if different businesses use water and will be challenged in different ways, external demands on companies to demonstrate sustainable water management are intensifying.

    The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) developed the Global Water Tool© in 2007 to help companies manage their water-related risks. The “water footprint” concept is generating ever-more interest worldwide, but there are also other measurement methods being developed. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is putting together standards on water footprinting requirements and guidelines. The Alliance for Water Stewardship is going to develop voluntary certification schemes. And the Carbon Disclosure Project has recently announced it will be collecting information on corporate water use.

    The WBCSD has been following progress and representing the leading business voice in a number of these burgeoning initiatives. This presentation will provide insights on how the pressure to report got switched on and what companies can do with the tools available today.

    Eva Zabey has been at the WBCSD for over five years, and currently works on water and ecosystems. Projects she has led and coordinated include the Water Scenarios to 2025, the Global Water Tool, facts on agricultural ecosystems and the links between water, energy and climate change. Her background is in ecology (BSc from Imperial College London) and she has a Master’s in Management and Engineering of the Environment from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland.
  • Managing Water - your Suppliers, your Business and your Consumers Recorded: Apr 21 2010 33 mins
    Businesses are beginning to focus more on their water use, often using similar tools to those they have used for carbon. But water is different, yes there are similarities but the carbon shoe does not fit the real water footprint. Water is spatial and temporal and adaptation and mitigation strategies for the water crisis must reflect this, water solutions have to be local.

    This presentation looks at how businesses can assess their water impacts at a macro level and then identify the most important intervention points. These may be nothing to do with the actual 'business' part of the equation but may rest with the supply chain or with the consumer's use of the product. The presentation then looks at local actions to address the macro level impacts, using real examples of best practice ranging from supply chain assessments, to technology fixes and to consumer education campaigns.

    Jacob Tompkins is the Managing Director of Waterwise, an NGO dedicated to promoting the efficient use of water www.waterwse.org.uk. He has a background in Hydrology and hydrogeology and studied at UCL and Imperial College London. He has previously been the environment adviser for the National Farmers' Union and the water policy adviser at Water UK. He has served as the UK representative of the European Water Suppliers Federation (Eureau) and sat the European Commission steering groups for a number of EU Directives. He is an editor of Sustain magazine.
  • Is Water the New Carbon? Corporations Expand Their Strategies Recorded: Apr 21 2009 45 mins
    Is Water the New Carbon? Corporations Expand Their Strategies
  • Global Water Trends and the Corporate Response Recorded: Apr 21 2009 48 mins
    The shifting water landscape requires a proactive strategy that takes into account both volumetric impacts and affects on local communities and watersheds. Companies today are expected to assess their water footprints and develop an appropriate set of responses that address water-related risk within their direct operations, supply chains and the watersheds in which they operate. Drawing from the best of our water strategy development work with Global 1000 companies, this session will highlight how companies are responding to water-related risk and prioritizing management efforts in setting long term goals.
  • Building Water Sustainability into Intel’s Business Processes Recorded: Apr 21 2009 39 mins
    Earth Day Every Day: Building Water Sustainability into Intel’s Business Processes
Responsible Resource and Facility Management
Water and energy are quickly becoming some of the world’s most valuable and sought after commodities. These webcasts will feature live presentations by scientists, academics, and business leaders addressing the increasingly important issue of energy and water management. For businesses, efficiency will cut costs and promote environmental awareness, and for all, this summit will provide insight into best practices, tips, case studies, and solutions for responsible resource and facility management.

Embed in website or blog

Successfully added emails: 0
Remove all
  • Title: Why Water Is A Critical Business Issue
  • Live at: Apr 21 2011 5:00 pm
  • Presented by: William Sarni, Director, Enterprise Water Strategy, Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • From:
Your email has been sent.
or close
You must be logged in to email this