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    • Regulatory Stress Tests:  Why do banks struggle? Regulatory Stress Tests: Why do banks struggle? Simon Goldsmith Recorded: Dec 15 2015 2:00 pm UTC 31 mins
    • Banks have prepared multi-year financial plans for decades; many with a stress testing component.
      Then in 2008-09, in response to the financial crisis, Regulators selected Stress Testing as a key tool for monitoring a bank’s financial health. They issued detailed guidance and instigated a rigorous review programme.

      6+ years on, banks have spent $millions on Regulatory Stress Tests and built big teams. Yet they struggle to deliver results on time and stress test quality remains poor.

      What have Regulators introduced that is so difficult?

      What new options do Banks have to meet requirements ?

      Read more >
    • Stress Testing 101 – Best Practices for the Community Banker Stress Testing 101 – Best Practices for the Community Banker Matthew Anderson, Trepp, LLC & Mike Benz, Trepp, LLC Recorded: Sep 17 2015 6:00 pm UTC 62 mins
    • Concentrations of credit, particularly those related to commercial real estate loans, have been a common factor in bank distress during economic downturns. Since the financial crisis, regulators have been laser focused on ensuring that the nation’s largest financial institutions – those with $10+ billion in assets – have sound stress testing and capital planning programs in place to ensure financial stability.

      The focus is trickling down to the community bank level and examiners are now asking smaller institutions to have appropriate programs in place. For many community bankers, there is uncertainty as to what examiners expect, as well as a lack of resources and expertise to comply. There is also a misconception about the value of stress testing, with attitudes ranging from “it’s a necessary evil” to “it is an integral part of our strategic planning process.”

      EDR, in partnership with sister company Trepp, is pleased to offer this complimentary webinar “Stress Testing 101 – Best Practices for the Community Banker.”

      Attendees with get answers to some commonly asked questions, including:

      -What is a stress test?
      -What is capital adequacy stress testing?
      -What are the regulators’ expectations?
      -What are the larger banks doing?
      -What is the current state of stress testing?
      -What do stress testing results look like?
      -What macroeconomic variables go into projections?

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    • Stress doesn’t have to be distressing Stress doesn’t have to be distressing Dr Penny Moyle, CEO, and John Hackston, Head of R&D, OPP Ltd Recorded: Apr 24 2013 2:00 pm UTC 62 mins
    • Workplace stress is always a hot topic in the HR press, and even more so currently as organisations push to achieve more with reduced resources and budget. Is the media’s portrayal of stress as bad correct – or is stress something we can learn to manage and even harness for positive benefit? Although most of us know what stress feels like, many of us fail to identify the best coping strategies for the productive management of the challenges that we face. And if we have trouble managing our own stress, how can we best support colleagues who experience stress differently?

      Penny and John will step through a well-established dynamic model of the stress process and explain how you can build individual and organisational resilience, not only to avoid stress turning into distress, but also to understand when it can be a positive, motivating force.

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    • Be better at managing conflict under stress Be better at managing conflict under stress Dr. Ralph H. Kilmann Recorded: Jun 5 2013 2:30 pm UTC 60 mins
    • The co-author of the TKI assessment will provide a deep understanding of how the increasing levels of stress experienced in the workplace can not only prevent people from using the best conflict mode in a given situation (competing, collaborating, compromising, avoiding, or accommodating), but can also push people to react blindly to conflicts with fight, flight, or freeze.

      Join Dr Ralph Kilmann on 5 June to find out how you can help people maintain moderate stress (neither high nor low), enabling them to manage their conflicts mindfully and thus successfully.

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    • Understanding & Treating Generalized Anxiety Disorder Understanding & Treating Generalized Anxiety Disorder Mark Pollack, MD, Director, Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders, Massachusetts General Hospital Recorded: Sep 21 2010 7:00 pm UTC 77 mins
    • Attendees will:
      - discuss the neurobiology of GAD
      - recognize symptoms and diagnose individuals with generalized anxiety disorder
      - plan evidence-based treatment for individuals with GAD and gad and comorbid disorders including depression, sleep disorders, cardiac illnesses and IBS.

      Webinar speaker:
      Mark Pollack, MD, Director, Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders, Massachusetts General Hospital
      Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

      Dr. Pollack’s areas of clinical and research interest include the acute and long-term course, pathophysiology, and treatment of patients with anxiety disorders and associated comorbidities, development of novel pharmacologic agents for mood and anxiety disorders, uses of combined cognitive-behavioral and pharmacologic therapies for treatment refractory patients, presentation and treatment of anxiety in the medical setting, and the pathophysiology and treatment of substance abuse.

      Blackwell Futura Media Services designates this educational activity for 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Blackwell Futura Media Services is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. DETAILS at: http://bit.ly/ADAA_CME1

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    • GAD and Cormorbidity:  Impact on Patient Health GAD and Cormorbidity: Impact on Patient Health Dr. Naomi M. Simon, Associate Director of the Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders Recorded: Nov 9 2010 5:00 pm UTC 66 mins
    • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is common, chronic, and associated with substantial impairment in function and quality of life. GAD commonly occurs comorbid with mood disorders and anxiety disorders. GAD comorbidity has been clearly linked to additive worsening of outcomes and function in both Major Depressive Disorder and in Bipolar Disorder. This presentation will provide an update on current understandings about the incidence and nature of GAD and comorbid disorders, and their impact on patient health.

      During this webinar attendees will:

      1) Understand the overlap of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) with mood disorders

      2) Understand the impact of GAD comorbidity on severity of illness including suicidality, quality of life and functioning in individuals with GAD

      3) Learn about the need to address GAD and its comorbidities to optimally improve patient health

      Naomi Michele Simon, M.D., M.Sc.

      Dr. Naomi M. Simon is Associate Director of the Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders and Director of the recently established Complicated Grief Program at Massachusetts General Hospital, and is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School.

      Blackwell Futura Media Services designates this educational activity for 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Blackwell Futura Media Services is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. DETAILS at: http://bit.ly/ADAA_CME5

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    • Stress-Free Selling® - Make Objections Disappear Stress-Free Selling® - Make Objections Disappear Jenae Rubin Recorded: Jan 29 2009 5:00 pm UTC 56 mins
    • Unintentionally, salespeople actually create the hurdles that prevent or prolong sales. By approaching sales the wrong way, or by skipping steps and rushing the sale, you actually increase the number of objections you get. In this instance, the objections aren’t real… they’re designed to just get rid of you. In the Stress-Free Selling® approach, you will create a comfortable experience for the people you hope to do business with, and you’ll create desire before you ever talk about price. What will happen is you will sell more, more easily and at higher prices. Price is an obstacle when people really aren’t interested in what you have. In This session, you will discover how to make objections disapppear...making sales easier, faster and stress-free.

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    • Interplay of Acetyltransferase EP300 and the Proteasome System in Regu-Session 1 Interplay of Acetyltransferase EP300 and the Proteasome System in Regu-Session 1 Mirko Theis & Christian Loew Recorded: May 21 2015 12:00 pm UTC 42 mins
    • In the present study, a genome-wide RNA interference screen was combined with an extensive biochemical analysis and quantitative proteomics to better understand the regulation of the heat-shock response (HSR) upon thermal stress. The usage of an endoribonuclease-prepared small interfering RNA (esiRNA) library represented a simple and efficient way to perform RNAi with minimal off-target effects. In the screening experiments novel positive and negative modulators of the stress response were identified, including proteins involved in chromatin remodeling, transcription, mRNA splicing, DNA damage repair, and proteolytic degradation. The diversity of the identified regulators suggests that induction and attenuation of the HSR integrate signals from different cellular pathways and are rather multi-factorial processes than single gene/protein events. The modulator proteins are localized in multiple cellular compartments with the majority having their primary location in the nucleus. A protein-protein interaction analysis revealed a HSR regulatory network, with chromatin modifiers and nuclear protein quality control components occupying hub positions. These observations are supported by quantitative proteomics experiments, which showed specific stress-induced reorganizations of the nuclear proteome, including the transient accumulation of chaperones and proteasomal subunits.
      Moreover, we found that the acetyltransferase EP300 controls the cellular level of activatable HSF1. This involves acetylation of HSF1 at multiple lysines not required for function and results in stabilization of HSF1 against proteasomal turnover. Acetylation of functionally critical lysines during stress serves to fine-tune HSF1 activation. Finally, the nuclear proteasome system functions in attenuating the stress response by degrading activated HSF1 in a manner linked with the clearance of misfolded proteins.

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    • Interplay of Acetyltransferase EP300 and the Proteasome System in Regulat-Sess.2 Interplay of Acetyltransferase EP300 and the Proteasome System in Regulat-Sess.2 Mirko Theis & Christian Loew Recorded: May 21 2015 8:00 pm UTC 38 mins
    • In the present study, a genome-wide RNA interference screen was combined with an extensive biochemical analysis and quantitative proteomics to better understand the regulation of the heat-shock response (HSR) upon thermal stress. The usage of an endoribonuclease-prepared small interfering RNA (esiRNA) library represented a simple and efficient way to perform RNAi with minimal off-target effects. In the screening experiments novel positive and negative modulators of the stress response were identified, including proteins involved in chromatin remodeling, transcription, mRNA splicing, DNA damage repair, and proteolytic degradation. The diversity of the identified regulators suggests that induction and attenuation of the HSR integrate signals from different cellular pathways and are rather multi-factorial processes than single gene/protein events. The modulator proteins are localized in multiple cellular compartments with the majority having their primary location in the nucleus. A protein-protein interaction analysis revealed a HSR regulatory network, with chromatin modifiers and nuclear protein quality control components occupying hub positions. These observations are supported by quantitative proteomics experiments, which showed specific stress-induced reorganizations of the nuclear proteome, including the transient accumulation of chaperones and proteasomal subunits.
      Moreover, we found that the acetyltransferase EP300 controls the cellular level of activatable HSF1. This involves acetylation of HSF1 at multiple lysines not required for function and results in stabilization of HSF1 against proteasomal turnover. Acetylation of functionally critical lysines during stress serves to fine-tune HSF1 activation. Finally, the nuclear proteasome system functions in attenuating the stress response by degrading activated HSF1 in a manner linked with the clearance of misfolded proteins.

      Read more >