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    • Panel Discussion: Innovation in Medtech
      Panel Discussion: Innovation in Medtech Pengson Ji (Chairman Ankon Technologies), Jingwei Lou (Chairman Biotecan Biology) Recorded: Jul 25 2017 9:00 am UTC 29 mins
    • Innovations in MedTech are playing an important role in China's economic restructuring. MedTech is undoubtedly one of the key sectors expected to be at the forefront of strategic technological progress in the coming years. Revolutionary potential lies in the conception and development of devices such as new imaging equipment and medical robots, in addition to the enhancement of biological 3D printing techniques.

      Due to factors such as an ageing population and greater personal consumption, China will continue to see the MedTech industry thrive. According to data from the China Medical Pharmaceutical Material Association (CMPMA), the Chinese medical equipment market has grown rapidly from just RMB 14.5 billion in 2004 to RMB 255 billion in 2014, representing a 16-fold increase in the short space of 10 years. The market is expected to exceed RMB 300 billion this year thanks to the effect of the ‘Made in China 2025’ strategy.

      Led by the panel moderator Tina Tan (Editor-in-Chief of Medtech insight), the panelists discussing such transformations are Jingwei Lou (Chairman, Biotecan Biology), Neil White (Head of Life Sciences of Medopadand) and Shibing Xia (Shibing Xia, General Manager at Golden Sunflower Capital Management).

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    • High Precision PCR utilizing ThermaGenix Reagents
      High Precision PCR utilizing ThermaGenix Reagents Professor Lawrence Wangh, Founder and CSO of ThermaGenix, Inc. Recorded: Oct 30 2018 3:00 pm UTC 47 mins
    • The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a mainstay of molecular biology and genomics that provides an efficient and rapid in vitro method for enzymatic amplification of DNA or RNA sequences from various sources. There are three unique, easy-to-use PCR additives that act at different temperatures to improve sensitivity and product yield by preventing mis-priming:

      1. ThermaStop™: a novel reagent that acts like a universal hot-start for Type A and Type B DNA polymerases
      2. ThermaGo™: a unique reagent that enhances the specificity of these same enzymes during the course of amplification
      3. ThermaStop™-RT: a first-in-class reagent that acts like a hot-start for many reverse transcriptases.

      Each reagent is a chemically modified oligonucleotide produced under GMP conditions and sold as a dry powder. Stable at room temperature, each reagent can simply be added to the enzyme of your choice prior to adding that enzyme/reagent complex to the master mix. These improvements are observed for both inexpensive Type A Taq polymerases and very expensive HiFi Type B DNA polymerases in applications such as qPCR, multiplexing, and preparation of DNA amplicons prior to next-generation sequencing (NGS).

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    • Literature search on a connected path
      Literature search on a connected path Elaine Reynolds, Assoc Prof of Biology & Neuroscience, Lafayette College; Rick Misra, PhD, ScienceDirect Product Manager Recorded: Sep 29 2017 3:00 pm UTC 54 mins
    • "What if researchers — particularly those new to certain disciplines or to research itself — could have a Wikipedia-like experience that was streamlined and trusted?" This is the question that led two neuroscientists on a fascinating journey to improve literature search, from exploring users' needs to applying cutting edge technologies.

      Students in an introductory and a higher-level class were assessed to determine where they were doing their research, their comfort level with reading reviews and primary literature, how frequently they came across unfamiliar terms, and how they handled cases where they needed additional clarity. Then they were provided the beta version of ScienceDirect Topics, an enhancement to the database that provides links within journal articles to 80,000+ topic pages with citable and trusted definitions that are contextualized within a discipline.

      Did it make a difference? Find out by attending the Library Connect webinar: Literature search on a connected path.

      Registration is required for this live one-hour webinar. It will be broadcast internationally and includes time to ask the presenters questions during the session. The webinar is a complimentary event and part of Elsevier's Library Connect program for academic, medical, corporate and government librarians.

      Cannot attend on Sept 29? Register for the webinar and you will be notified when it can be viewed online after the event.

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    • Accelerating Interdisciplinary Research - Introducing BioRN @ SSRN
      Accelerating Interdisciplinary Research - Introducing BioRN @ SSRN Gregg Gordon Recorded: Jun 21 2017 6:00 pm UTC 46 mins
    • Get involved. Learn about the newest research and the visionary behind Tomorrow's Research Today. SSRN is a leading multi-discipline online pre-print repository of scholarly research in the social science and humanities. Now, with the BioRN research network, biology researchers can share their ideas early and be noticed for their theories early. In the SSRN community, biologists and social science theorists are collaboration and sharing ideas early and receiving the credit they deserve while refining their overall final research before peer review publication. Moving research forward faster is SSRNs mantra and guiding force to science enablement. Your scholarly research contributions get noticed with SSRN.

      Gregg is the managing director of SSRN focused on the high quality, rapid, electronic dissemination of scholarly research at the lowest possible cost - Tomorrow's Research Today.

      In May 2016, SSRN joined Elsevier, a world-leading provider of information solutions promoting the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, and deliver better care. Together, we can further enhance early discoveries of ideas in an open-access environment of sharing and collaboration.

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    • IOP ebooks - Meet the author Professor Brian Diffey
      IOP ebooks - Meet the author Professor Brian Diffey Professor Brian Diffey Recorded: Aug 9 2018 2:00 pm UTC 45 mins
    • Join us for this 45 minute webinar with the author of Sun Protection: A risk management approach, Professor Brian Diffey. Professor Diffey will give an overview of his book, key learning points and answer your questions in a live Q&A.

      About the book
      Sun Protection differentiates itself from other texts by adopting a risk-management approach to determine whether, how, and in what circumstances, harm might be caused, and to explore the feasibility of various strategies in controlling exposure to solar UV radiation. This multi-disciplinary book covers topics from climatology through human exposure to sunlight, as well as biological and clinical effects of UV radiation to physical and chemical strategies for photoprotection.

      This webinar is recommended viewing for biologists and dermatologists and will be of interest to physical scientists and those working in the skin care industry.

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    • Generation of a landing-pad T cell line useful for T cell receptor customization
      Generation of a landing-pad T cell line useful for T cell receptor customization Stacey Ward, PhD Recorded: Apr 17 2018 5:00 pm UTC 45 mins
    • T cell biology is integral to the study of normal immune regulation as well as cancer biology, Car-T cells, epitope specificity and antigen presentation. However, primary T cells can be difficult to propagate in culture for the length of time necessary for functional assays. In addition, primary T cells express variant T cell receptor (TCR) heterodimers that can be challenging to identify and may not be optimal for downstream studies. We sought to simplify this system using transformed T cells which can be grown in culture for extended periods of time. We engineered a floxed landing pad sequence into the safe harbor AAVS1 genetic locus using CompoZr zinc finger nucleases. Both the promoter and landing pad expression cassette are flanked by unique lox sites, allowing swapping of either the promoter and/or expression cassette as needed. We ensured that only one copy of this sequence was found within the genome to avoid any complications associated with random insertion events. We also generated a landing pad cell line null for the endogenous TCR using Cas9/CRISPR ribonucleotide complexes. Both the TCR alpha and beta loci were rendered null due to non-homologous end joining and the presence of insertions and deletions culminating in premature stop codons were genotyped using next generation sequencing. The absence of a functional TCR was validated using flow cytometry staining for surface TCR and CD3. This cell line was then used to generate a knock-in of the desired exogenous TCR heterodimer to the landing pad locus, verified using flow cytometry staining. These lines will be very useful for a multitude of studies where a researcher needs to express a gene of interest in a discrete genetic locus or wants to generate a panel of TCR expressing cell lines.

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    • Generation of a landing-pad T cell line useful for T cell receptor customization
      Generation of a landing-pad T cell line useful for T cell receptor customization Stacey Ward, PhD Recorded: Apr 18 2018 1:00 pm UTC 49 mins
    • T cell biology is integral to the study of normal immune regulation as well as cancer biology, Car-T cells, epitope specificity and antigen presentation. However, primary T cells can be difficult to propagate in culture for the length of time necessary for functional assays. In addition, primary T cells express variant T cell receptor (TCR) heterodimers that can be challenging to identify and may not be optimal for downstream studies. We sought to simplify this system using transformed T cells which can be grown in culture for extended periods of time. We engineered a floxed landing pad sequence into the safe harbor AAVS1 genetic locus using CompoZr zinc finger nucleases. Both the promoter and landing pad expression cassette are flanked by unique lox sites, allowing swapping of either the promoter and/or expression cassette as needed. We ensured that only one copy of this sequence was found within the genome to avoid any complications associated with random insertion events. We also generated a landing pad cell line null for the endogenous TCR using Cas9/CRISPR ribonucleotide complexes. Both the TCR alpha and beta loci were rendered null due to non-homologous end joining and the presence of insertions and deletions culminating in premature stop codons were genotyped using next generation sequencing. The absence of a functional TCR was validated using flow cytometry staining for surface TCR and CD3. This cell line was then used to generate a knock-in of the desired exogenous TCR heterodimer to the landing pad locus, verified using flow cytometry staining. These lines will be very useful for a multitude of studies where a researcher needs to express a gene of interest in a discrete genetic locus or wants to generate a panel of TCR expressing cell lines.

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    • Precision genome editing in macrophage and CD8+ human primary T cells for immuno
      Precision genome editing in macrophage and CD8+ human primary T cells for immuno Laura Daley, PhD Recorded: May 22 2018 1:00 pm UTC 54 mins
    • Innate immune cells play a critical role in cell-mediated immunity and have the potential to serve as cell-based therapies to treat a broad spectrum of immune diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders. Modified immune cells, such as genetically engineered CAR-T cells, have proven to be critical in developing new cell-based therapies for these diseases. However, immune cell biology creates challenges during the gene-editing process that lead to hyper-regulated RNA and DNA sensing pathways and enhanced cell death upon introduction of exogenous ribonucleotides. Further, engineering in primary immune cells is often restricted due to their limited expansion capacity. Genetic engineering in immune cells has traditionally relied on random integration of gene-editing components using viral delivery systems. In contrast, genome editing mediated by nucleases, such as CRISPR/Cas9-single guide RNPs, provide a platform for precision editing, and alleviate the potential side effects caused by randomly integrated viral DNA. While RNP gene editing in immune cells is just beginning to be considered by the immune-therapeutics field, our recent advances demonstrate that this approach can be used to create targeted modifications in two key cell types, the macrophage and the CD8+ primary T-cell. In an effort to circumvent challenges with the finite lifespan of primary T-cells, we targeted genes to edit that rendered this cell type “pseudo-immortalized”, allowing additional passages for further downstream genome editing and propagation. In addition, we demonstrated that precision editing can be used to introduce disease relevant SNPs into the macrophage genome, which resist introduction of exogenous ribonucleotides due to the induction of apoptotic pathways. Advances such as these overcome many of the obstacles currently faced with immune cell editing and offer improved gene stability and expression in immune cells and will transform the Immuno-Oncology and Gene Therapy fields.

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    • Precision genome editing in macrophage and CD8+ human primary T cells for immuno
      Precision genome editing in macrophage and CD8+ human primary T cells for immuno Laura Daley, PhD Recorded: May 22 2018 5:00 pm UTC 54 mins
    • Innate immune cells play a critical role in cell-mediated immunity and have the potential to serve as cell-based therapies to treat a broad spectrum of immune diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders. Modified immune cells, such as genetically engineered CAR-T cells, have proven to be critical in developing new cell-based therapies for these diseases. However, immune cell biology creates challenges during the gene-editing process that lead to hyper-regulated RNA and DNA sensing pathways and enhanced cell death upon introduction of exogenous ribonucleotides. Further, engineering in primary immune cells is often restricted due to their limited expansion capacity. Genetic engineering in immune cells has traditionally relied on random integration of gene-editing components using viral delivery systems. In contrast, genome editing mediated by nucleases, such as CRISPR/Cas9-single guide RNPs, provide a platform for precision editing, and alleviate the potential side effects caused by randomly integrated viral DNA. While RNP gene editing in immune cells is just beginning to be considered by the immune-therapeutics field, our recent advances demonstrate that this approach can be used to create targeted modifications in two key cell types, the macrophage and the CD8+ primary T-cell. In an effort to circumvent challenges with the finite lifespan of primary T-cells, we targeted genes to edit that rendered this cell type “pseudo-immortalized”, allowing additional passages for further downstream genome editing and propagation. In addition, we demonstrated that precision editing can be used to introduce disease relevant SNPs into the macrophage genome, which resist introduction of exogenous ribonucleotides due to the induction of apoptotic pathways. Advances such as these overcome many of the obstacles currently faced with immune cell editing and offer improved gene stability and expression in immune cells and will transform the Immuno-Oncology and Gene Therapy fields.

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    • Amplified Detection of Proteins and their Interactions using Duolink PLA
      Amplified Detection of Proteins and their Interactions using Duolink PLA Manpreet Mutneja, Ph.D, MBA Sr. Product Manager, Molecular Platforms Life Science Research, MilliporeSigma Recorded: Jun 15 2017 5:00 pm UTC 44 mins
    • Understanding the movements, modifications and interactions of proteins within a cell is key to unraveling the fundamental tenets of biology. However, the low-level expression of many proteins, combined with the transient nature of their interactions and movements, makes analyzing and understanding these processes quite difficult. Duolink® PLA, which is based on the principles of the proximity ligation assay (PLA), offers a solution to overcome these hurdles and to study the actions of endogenous proteins within cells and tissues. Combining the specificity of antibodies with the sensitivity afforded by rolling circle amplification, Duolink® PLA allows you to detect, visualize, and quantitate proteins and their interactions (even single events) where they happen within cells or tissue, all without overexpression or genetic manipulation. This seminar will cover the basic assay principle and advantages of the Duolink® PLA technology, and discuss recent applications and developments of the technology that make it an excellent tool to understand the fundamental mechanisms of biology, as well as disease states. Applications of Duolink® PLA include the investigation of cellular responses to varying stimuli, receptor dimerization and signalling cascades, post-translational modifications, and regulation of protein expression. New developments include use in flow cytometry and multiplexed detection.

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    • Next Generation IHC
      Next Generation IHC Jeff Gordon Recorded: Dec 5 2018 4:00 pm UTC 57 mins
    • Immunohistochemistry has now been a staple in diagnostic pathology for decades. This is partially due to pathologist utilization of antibodies in the realm of specialty panels. As the science evolves, the panels evolve, creating demand for the next generation of antibodies to improve diagnostic capabilities. This talk will give an overview of some of these novel diagnostic markers and how they fit into the specialty panels with the traditional antibodies to provide the best diagnostic capabilities to the pathologist, therefore giving the patient the best care available.

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