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    • Panel Discussion: Innovation in Medtech
      Panel Discussion: Innovation in Medtech Pengson Ji (Chairman Ankon Technologies), Jingwei Lou (Chairman Biotecan Biology) Recorded: Jul 25 2017 9:00 am UTC 29 mins
    • Innovations in MedTech are playing an important role in China's economic restructuring. MedTech is undoubtedly one of the key sectors expected to be at the forefront of strategic technological progress in the coming years. Revolutionary potential lies in the conception and development of devices such as new imaging equipment and medical robots, in addition to the enhancement of biological 3D printing techniques.

      Due to factors such as an ageing population and greater personal consumption, China will continue to see the MedTech industry thrive. According to data from the China Medical Pharmaceutical Material Association (CMPMA), the Chinese medical equipment market has grown rapidly from just RMB 14.5 billion in 2004 to RMB 255 billion in 2014, representing a 16-fold increase in the short space of 10 years. The market is expected to exceed RMB 300 billion this year thanks to the effect of the ‘Made in China 2025’ strategy.

      Led by the panel moderator Tina Tan (Editor-in-Chief of Medtech insight), the panelists discussing such transformations are Jingwei Lou (Chairman, Biotecan Biology), Neil White (Head of Life Sciences of Medopadand) and Shibing Xia (Shibing Xia, General Manager at Golden Sunflower Capital Management).

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    • Literature search on a connected path
      Literature search on a connected path Elaine Reynolds, Assoc Prof of Biology & Neuroscience, Lafayette College; Rick Misra, PhD, ScienceDirect Product Manager Recorded: Sep 29 2017 3:00 pm UTC 54 mins
    • "What if researchers — particularly those new to certain disciplines or to research itself — could have a Wikipedia-like experience that was streamlined and trusted?" This is the question that led two neuroscientists on a fascinating journey to improve literature search, from exploring users' needs to applying cutting edge technologies.

      Students in an introductory and a higher-level class were assessed to determine where they were doing their research, their comfort level with reading reviews and primary literature, how frequently they came across unfamiliar terms, and how they handled cases where they needed additional clarity. Then they were provided the beta version of ScienceDirect Topics, an enhancement to the database that provides links within journal articles to 80,000+ topic pages with citable and trusted definitions that are contextualized within a discipline.

      Did it make a difference? Find out by attending the Library Connect webinar: Literature search on a connected path.

      Registration is required for this live one-hour webinar. It will be broadcast internationally and includes time to ask the presenters questions during the session. The webinar is a complimentary event and part of Elsevier's Library Connect program for academic, medical, corporate and government librarians.

      Cannot attend on Sept 29? Register for the webinar and you will be notified when it can be viewed online after the event.

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    • Accelerating Interdisciplinary Research - Introducing BioRN @ SSRN
      Accelerating Interdisciplinary Research - Introducing BioRN @ SSRN Gregg Gordon Recorded: Jun 21 2017 6:00 pm UTC 46 mins
    • Get involved. Learn about the newest research and the visionary behind Tomorrow's Research Today. SSRN is a leading multi-discipline online pre-print repository of scholarly research in the social science and humanities. Now, with the BioRN research network, biology researchers can share their ideas early and be noticed for their theories early. In the SSRN community, biologists and social science theorists are collaboration and sharing ideas early and receiving the credit they deserve while refining their overall final research before peer review publication. Moving research forward faster is SSRNs mantra and guiding force to science enablement. Your scholarly research contributions get noticed with SSRN.

      Gregg is the managing director of SSRN focused on the high quality, rapid, electronic dissemination of scholarly research at the lowest possible cost - Tomorrow's Research Today.

      In May 2016, SSRN joined Elsevier, a world-leading provider of information solutions promoting the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, and deliver better care. Together, we can further enhance early discoveries of ideas in an open-access environment of sharing and collaboration.

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    • Generation of a landing-pad T cell line useful for T cell receptor customization
      Generation of a landing-pad T cell line useful for T cell receptor customization Stacey Ward, PhD Recorded: Apr 18 2018 1:00 pm UTC 49 mins
    • T cell biology is integral to the study of normal immune regulation as well as cancer biology, Car-T cells, epitope specificity and antigen presentation. However, primary T cells can be difficult to propagate in culture for the length of time necessary for functional assays. In addition, primary T cells express variant T cell receptor (TCR) heterodimers that can be challenging to identify and may not be optimal for downstream studies. We sought to simplify this system using transformed T cells which can be grown in culture for extended periods of time. We engineered a floxed landing pad sequence into the safe harbor AAVS1 genetic locus using CompoZr zinc finger nucleases. Both the promoter and landing pad expression cassette are flanked by unique lox sites, allowing swapping of either the promoter and/or expression cassette as needed. We ensured that only one copy of this sequence was found within the genome to avoid any complications associated with random insertion events. We also generated a landing pad cell line null for the endogenous TCR using Cas9/CRISPR ribonucleotide complexes. Both the TCR alpha and beta loci were rendered null due to non-homologous end joining and the presence of insertions and deletions culminating in premature stop codons were genotyped using next generation sequencing. The absence of a functional TCR was validated using flow cytometry staining for surface TCR and CD3. This cell line was then used to generate a knock-in of the desired exogenous TCR heterodimer to the landing pad locus, verified using flow cytometry staining. These lines will be very useful for a multitude of studies where a researcher needs to express a gene of interest in a discrete genetic locus or wants to generate a panel of TCR expressing cell lines.

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    • Generation of a landing-pad T cell line useful for T cell receptor customization
      Generation of a landing-pad T cell line useful for T cell receptor customization Stacey Ward, PhD Recorded: Apr 17 2018 5:00 pm UTC 45 mins
    • T cell biology is integral to the study of normal immune regulation as well as cancer biology, Car-T cells, epitope specificity and antigen presentation. However, primary T cells can be difficult to propagate in culture for the length of time necessary for functional assays. In addition, primary T cells express variant T cell receptor (TCR) heterodimers that can be challenging to identify and may not be optimal for downstream studies. We sought to simplify this system using transformed T cells which can be grown in culture for extended periods of time. We engineered a floxed landing pad sequence into the safe harbor AAVS1 genetic locus using CompoZr zinc finger nucleases. Both the promoter and landing pad expression cassette are flanked by unique lox sites, allowing swapping of either the promoter and/or expression cassette as needed. We ensured that only one copy of this sequence was found within the genome to avoid any complications associated with random insertion events. We also generated a landing pad cell line null for the endogenous TCR using Cas9/CRISPR ribonucleotide complexes. Both the TCR alpha and beta loci were rendered null due to non-homologous end joining and the presence of insertions and deletions culminating in premature stop codons were genotyped using next generation sequencing. The absence of a functional TCR was validated using flow cytometry staining for surface TCR and CD3. This cell line was then used to generate a knock-in of the desired exogenous TCR heterodimer to the landing pad locus, verified using flow cytometry staining. These lines will be very useful for a multitude of studies where a researcher needs to express a gene of interest in a discrete genetic locus or wants to generate a panel of TCR expressing cell lines.

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    • Precision genome editing in macrophage and CD8+ human primary T cells for immuno
      Precision genome editing in macrophage and CD8+ human primary T cells for immuno Laura Daley, PhD Recorded: May 22 2018 5:00 pm UTC 54 mins
    • Innate immune cells play a critical role in cell-mediated immunity and have the potential to serve as cell-based therapies to treat a broad spectrum of immune diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders. Modified immune cells, such as genetically engineered CAR-T cells, have proven to be critical in developing new cell-based therapies for these diseases. However, immune cell biology creates challenges during the gene-editing process that lead to hyper-regulated RNA and DNA sensing pathways and enhanced cell death upon introduction of exogenous ribonucleotides. Further, engineering in primary immune cells is often restricted due to their limited expansion capacity. Genetic engineering in immune cells has traditionally relied on random integration of gene-editing components using viral delivery systems. In contrast, genome editing mediated by nucleases, such as CRISPR/Cas9-single guide RNPs, provide a platform for precision editing, and alleviate the potential side effects caused by randomly integrated viral DNA. While RNP gene editing in immune cells is just beginning to be considered by the immune-therapeutics field, our recent advances demonstrate that this approach can be used to create targeted modifications in two key cell types, the macrophage and the CD8+ primary T-cell. In an effort to circumvent challenges with the finite lifespan of primary T-cells, we targeted genes to edit that rendered this cell type “pseudo-immortalized”, allowing additional passages for further downstream genome editing and propagation. In addition, we demonstrated that precision editing can be used to introduce disease relevant SNPs into the macrophage genome, which resist introduction of exogenous ribonucleotides due to the induction of apoptotic pathways. Advances such as these overcome many of the obstacles currently faced with immune cell editing and offer improved gene stability and expression in immune cells and will transform the Immuno-Oncology and Gene Therapy fields.

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    • Precision genome editing in macrophage and CD8+ human primary T cells for immuno
      Precision genome editing in macrophage and CD8+ human primary T cells for immuno Laura Daley, PhD Recorded: May 22 2018 1:00 pm UTC 54 mins
    • Innate immune cells play a critical role in cell-mediated immunity and have the potential to serve as cell-based therapies to treat a broad spectrum of immune diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders. Modified immune cells, such as genetically engineered CAR-T cells, have proven to be critical in developing new cell-based therapies for these diseases. However, immune cell biology creates challenges during the gene-editing process that lead to hyper-regulated RNA and DNA sensing pathways and enhanced cell death upon introduction of exogenous ribonucleotides. Further, engineering in primary immune cells is often restricted due to their limited expansion capacity. Genetic engineering in immune cells has traditionally relied on random integration of gene-editing components using viral delivery systems. In contrast, genome editing mediated by nucleases, such as CRISPR/Cas9-single guide RNPs, provide a platform for precision editing, and alleviate the potential side effects caused by randomly integrated viral DNA. While RNP gene editing in immune cells is just beginning to be considered by the immune-therapeutics field, our recent advances demonstrate that this approach can be used to create targeted modifications in two key cell types, the macrophage and the CD8+ primary T-cell. In an effort to circumvent challenges with the finite lifespan of primary T-cells, we targeted genes to edit that rendered this cell type “pseudo-immortalized”, allowing additional passages for further downstream genome editing and propagation. In addition, we demonstrated that precision editing can be used to introduce disease relevant SNPs into the macrophage genome, which resist introduction of exogenous ribonucleotides due to the induction of apoptotic pathways. Advances such as these overcome many of the obstacles currently faced with immune cell editing and offer improved gene stability and expression in immune cells and will transform the Immuno-Oncology and Gene Therapy fields.

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    • Amplified Detection of Proteins and their Interactions using Duolink PLA
      Amplified Detection of Proteins and their Interactions using Duolink PLA Manpreet Mutneja, Ph.D, MBA Sr. Product Manager, Molecular Platforms Life Science Research, MilliporeSigma Recorded: Jun 15 2017 5:00 pm UTC 44 mins
    • Understanding the movements, modifications and interactions of proteins within a cell is key to unraveling the fundamental tenets of biology. However, the low-level expression of many proteins, combined with the transient nature of their interactions and movements, makes analyzing and understanding these processes quite difficult. Duolink® PLA, which is based on the principles of the proximity ligation assay (PLA), offers a solution to overcome these hurdles and to study the actions of endogenous proteins within cells and tissues. Combining the specificity of antibodies with the sensitivity afforded by rolling circle amplification, Duolink® PLA allows you to detect, visualize, and quantitate proteins and their interactions (even single events) where they happen within cells or tissue, all without overexpression or genetic manipulation. This seminar will cover the basic assay principle and advantages of the Duolink® PLA technology, and discuss recent applications and developments of the technology that make it an excellent tool to understand the fundamental mechanisms of biology, as well as disease states. Applications of Duolink® PLA include the investigation of cellular responses to varying stimuli, receptor dimerization and signalling cascades, post-translational modifications, and regulation of protein expression. New developments include use in flow cytometry and multiplexed detection.

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    • The Laboratory’s Role in the National Healthcare Safety Network
      The Laboratory’s Role in the National Healthcare Safety Network Robert L. Sautter, Ph.D., HCLD (ABB), CC Recorded: Apr 9 2018 6:00 pm UTC 58 mins
    • In this webinar, Dr. Sautter will discuss the important collaboration efforts between the government and healthcare facilities to stop prevalent and dangerous hospital-acquired infections. After the webinar, you will be able to:

      • Explain how the laboratory and the NHSN can work together to lower infection rates in hospitals
      • Learn how to lower rates of infections, such as blood culture contamination, MRSA and C. difficile
      • Identify how pre-analytic culture collection can affect the results of clean catch and catheter-related infections
      • Discuss how laboratories can work together with the NHSN, an infection surveillance program created by the CDC to eliminate HAIs, to identify problem areas and measure the progress of prevention initiatives

      P.A.C.E. credit* is available for your participation at http://qmark.beckmancoulter.com/r/325Safety.html

      Presenter: Dr. Sautter is a teacher, lecturer and industry consultant. He earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Eastern Michigan University in the areas of biology and molecular biology, respectively, and his Ph.D., from Wayne State University, in Detroit, Mich., in microbiology. During his career, he held positions as a medical technologist, director of microbiology and medical director for a number of laboratories, before becoming an esteemed consultant for a variety of industry leaders in the area of microbiology.

      *Beckman Coulter Inc. is approved as a provider of continuing education programs in the clinical laboratory sciences by the ASCLS P.A.C.E.® Program. These credits are recognized by the State of California. Most programs also provide State of Florida credits (with valid license number). At this time, we cannot issue continuing education credits for those who provide healthcare (or work for an institution that provides healthcare) in Massachusetts or Vermont.

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    • Does it matter if an algorithm can't explain how it knows what it knows?
      Does it matter if an algorithm can't explain how it knows what it knows? Beau Walker, Founder, Method Data Science Recorded: May 24 2018 3:30 pm UTC 34 mins
    • With the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) becoming enforceable in the EU on May 25, 2018, many data scientists are worried about the impact that this regulation and similar initiatives in other countries that give consumers a "right to explanation" of decisions made by algorithms will have on the field of predictive and prescriptive analytics.

      In this session, Beau will discuss the role of interpretable algorithms in data science as well as explore tools and methods for explaining high-performing algorithms.

      Beau Walker has a Juris Doctorate (law degree) and BS and MS Degrees in Biology and Ecology and Evolution. Beau has worked in many domains including academia, pharma, healthcare, life sciences, insurance, legal, financial services, marketing, and IoT.

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    • A Biological Perspective of Malware
      A Biological Perspective of Malware Guy Propper, Security researcher at Deep Instinct Recorded: May 16 2018 5:00 pm UTC 35 mins
    • The term “virus” exists both in biology and in computers, but how deep are the similarities and differences between biological viruses and computer malware?

      The life cycle of biological viruses, which begins in infection of the host and execution of the viral payload, and leads to the immune response of the host and the evolution of both host and virus, has many surprising similarities with malware. Concepts such as code injection, evasion and obfuscation exist both in the biological and computer realms.

      This webinar provides an understanding of each stage in the life cycle of a biological virus, and compares it to the relevant stage in the life cycle of malware. Surprising differences between malware and virus actions will be shown, and some mechanisms which are used by viruses, but have not been adopted, or even attempted by malware, will be revealed.

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