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    • Advanced Cell Culture Technology for Generation of In Vivo-like Tissue Models
      Advanced Cell Culture Technology for Generation of In Vivo-like Tissue Models Stefan Przyborski, PhD - Professor of Cell Technology, Durham University UK Recorded: Jun 30 2017 2:00 pm UTC 64 mins
    • The benefits of three dimensional (3D) cell culture are widely appreciated. More cell-based technologies are now becoming available that enable researchers to preserve the native 3D structure of cells in vitro. These can be broadly divided into three areas: aggregate-based methods; hydrogels and extra-cellular matrices; and inert scaffold-based technologies. Each has strengths and weaknesses and there is no one technology that satisfies all applications. Tissues in the body are mostly composed of different cell types that are often highly organized in relation to each other. Often cells are arranged in distinct layers that enable signalling and cell-to-cell interactions. Alternatively in tumours, cancer cells form aggregates and tissue masses composed of different cell types. Recreation of these types of architecture will significantly evolve 3D cell culture to a new level where real tissue-like structures can be generated in vitro.

      This webinar will review the alternative approaches available to researchers and provide an overview of their capabilities and example applications. More sophisticated models are developing as 3D cell culture technology becomes established and accepted as a means of creating more physiologically relevant cell-based assays. Methods that are relatively straightforward to use and that recreate the organized structure of real tissues will become valuable research tools for use in discovery, validation studies, and modelling disease.

      Key areas covered:
      • 2D vs 3D cell culture debate
      • Review of alternative approaches and the development of new technologies
      • Challenges facing 3D culture methods, in terms of technologies available and methods used
      • Showcase applications where 3D technology makes a difference
      • Future perspective for 3D cell culture technology and further development

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    • New Technologies for Cellular Research: 3-Dimensional Cell Culture and Screening
      New Technologies for Cellular Research: 3-Dimensional Cell Culture and Screening Richard M. Eglen, Ph.D Recorded: Sep 22 2017 4:00 pm UTC 54 mins
    • It is now recognized that target and compound identification, as well as validation, are better conducted using cells with physiologically relevant phenotypes and genotypes. This assertion has accelerated the adoption of primary cells, stem cells, or patient-specific cells in cellular research, in general; and drug discovery, in particular.

      Technological improvements in three-dimensional (3D) cell culture technology, as a means to better mimic in vivo physiology, have accelerated recently—not only in the areas of cancer and neurological research, but also for the assessment of compound metabolic and toxicological liabilities. Furthermore, 3D cell culture can provide novel approaches to the scale-up and manufacture of biologically based medicines, including those used in immuno-and stem cell-based therapies.

      In this presentation, the existing and future impact of 3D cell culture technology on fundamental research, and drug discovery and manufacture will be addressed, particularly in the context of using phenotypically relevant cells. Specifically, it will discuss the potential for spheroids, organoids, scaffolds, and hydrogels in cellular research and compound identification, screening, and development.

      Future directions will also be covered, including organs-on-chips, hydrostatic flow technologies, microfluidics, and 3D bioprinting. Some of these approaches will allow for real-time observation of cellular responsiveness to novel compounds and drugs … boldly taking the researcher into a fourth dimension of 3D cell culture!

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    • The Impact of Soluble Factors and Substrate on Cell Culture
      The Impact of Soluble Factors and Substrate on Cell Culture Kevin Kelly Recorded: Nov 3 2016 4:00 pm UTC 48 mins
    • Webinar: The Impact of Soluble Factors and Substrate on Cell Culture: Media Additives, Growth Factors, and Surface

      From basal media with feeder layers or serum to highly defined recombinant growth factors, cytokine, and extracellular matrix, there are many ways to grow the same cell type. The choice is dependent on scale, cost, control, skill, and regulatory factors.

      This webinar will cover:
      - Different ways to grow the same cell type
      - The actual material costs of various methods
      - Methods used to optimize formulations

      Speaker Bio:
      Kevin Kelly graduated from Hawaii Pacific University and for 15 years worked on process scale-up and optimization for extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, cytokines, antibodies, ELISA kits, and Corning® BioCoat™ products.

      Currently he provides applications support for invasion, migration, permeability, transport, differentiation, and metabolism assays.

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    • Current Trends in 3D and Organoid Cell Culture for Cancer Research
      Current Trends in 3D and Organoid Cell Culture for Cancer Research Marshall Kosovsky, Ph.D., Ömer H. Yilmaz, M.D., Ph.D.,Wojciech Senkowski, Recorded: Oct 4 2016 4:00 pm UTC 67 mins
    • Corning was pleased to have recently sponsored a GEN webinar highlighting the latest techniques for 3D cell culture in cancer research.

      The use of 3D cell cultures has been rising sharply in recent years from its initial introduction, over two decades ago. Because 3D cultures more accurately mimic the cellular environment, they can be used to study various forms of cancer by fostering the growth of organoids that replicate key properties of in vivo organ systems or the original tumors from which they were derived.

      In addition, many 3D cultures are amenable to large-scale drug screens for rapid detection of phenotypic or genetic changes associated with therapeutic compounds—an approach that opens the door for the use of 3D culture as an integral part of personalized medicine.

      In this GEN webinar, panelists discussed how the latest 3D cell culture methods have facilitated breakthroughs in their research projects.

      Panelists:
      Marshall Kosovsky, Ph.D., Global Scientific Support Manager for Corning Life Sciences, will give a brief introduction into advances in Corning’s 3D culturing solutions.

      Ömer H. Yilmaz, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will describe his work on how adult stem cells and their microenvironment adapt to diverse conditions within the context of tissue regeneration and cancer initiation through the use of ex vivo intestinal organoid assays.

      Wojciech Senkowski, Doctoral candidate in the Department of Medical Sciences at Uppsala University in Sweden, will discuss his current work, which looks for applications of various tumor spheroid models in high-throughput drug screening for ways to identify novel compounds that target these cell populations

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    • Understanding Cell Culture Media Composition to Improve Outcomes
      Understanding Cell Culture Media Composition to Improve Outcomes Brian Posey Recorded: Jul 28 2016 4:00 pm UTC 59 mins
    • Cell culture media is required for successful and reproducible research but the catalog is full of acronyms and various formulation tables. Classical mammalian cell culture media formulations are very diverse both in terms of the number available and the concentration of constituents. Additionally, each medium was designed for specific cell types and culturing conditions.

      This webinar will cover:
      •The composition, characteristics, environmental factors, and additional supplements required to create optimal conditions for growth and productivity.
      •Determining the right formulation for your application.
      •Serum usage and helpful tips for optimizing your culture conditions.

      Speaker Bio:
      Brian Posey is a Product Development Manager for cell culture media at Corning Life Sciences. Brian has over 10 years experience in cell biology and industrial scale cGMP manufacturing of both liquid and powder cell culture media. Since joining Corning in 2012, Brian has led numerous innovative technology projects for the media business ranging from customer technology transfer for production scale-up to developing new serum-free media for industrial and stem cell lines.

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    • An Introduction To Cell Culture
      An Introduction To Cell Culture Mark Rothenberg, Ph.D. Recorded: Apr 30 2015 4:00 pm UTC 58 mins
    • This webinar will introduce the history, theory, basic techniques, and potential pit-falls of mammalian cell culture. It is designed for students and new lab technicians, as well as bench scientists interested in updating their techniques or knowledge in the field.

      Topics to be discussed include:
      • History and practical theories of cell culture and its impact on today’s science
      • The requirements needed to set up a cell culture laboratory
      • Challenges when performing mammalian cell culture and how to overcome them

      About our Presenter:
      Dr. Mark Rothenberg graduated from Emory University with his Ph.D. in Cell and Developmental Biology. Over the past 25 years, Mark has held positions in both academia and industry where he has developed an expertise in the areas of assay development and cell culture. He currently holds the position of Manager Scientific Training and Education with Corning Life Sciences.

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    • Materials and Systems for Optimizing 3D Cell Culture Environments
      Materials and Systems for Optimizing 3D Cell Culture Environments Marshall Kosovsky, Ph.D. Recorded: Feb 18 2014 5:00 pm UTC 64 mins
    • Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments provide structural and biochemical cues for cellular differentiation and functionality. For specialized cell types such as primary cells, a two-dimensional growth substrate may not be sufficient to support complex cellular behaviors such as cell polarity, morphology, signal transduction, and tissue-specific gene expression. This webinar will highlight applications that rely on 3D materials and systems, including Corning ® Matrigel® Matrix (reconstituted basement membrane), Collagen Type I, Corning PuraMatrix™ Peptide Hydrogel, and permeable supports (cell culture inserts). To demonstrate the effectiveness of these environments, the biological and functional properties of a variety of cell types will be discussed.

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    • Cell Culture Contamination Part 1 – Understanding Cell Culture Contamination
      Cell Culture Contamination Part 1 – Understanding Cell Culture Contamination Louie Tran Recorded: Jun 11 2013 4:00 pm UTC 46 mins
    • Recent studies have shown that at least 20% of the animal cell cultures currently in use in the US are contaminated by either microorganisms or other cell lines. This three part live, on-line seminar series will review the scope of this major problem and examine some of its causes and techniques for avoiding it. It will also explore some key, easy to employ strategies for preventing these losses by careful culture management.

      This webinar will discuss good aseptic technique: developing a practical approach to aseptic technique; reducing day-to-day contamination problems in the lab; and helpful hints for avoiding contamination.

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    • Cell Culture Contamination Part 2 - Aseptic Technique
      Cell Culture Contamination Part 2 - Aseptic Technique Hannah Gitschier Recorded: Jul 17 2013 4:00 pm UTC 46 mins
    • Studies have shown that at least 20% of the animal cell cultures currently in existence are contaminated by either microorganisms or other cell lines. This three part live, on-line seminar series will review the scope of this major problem, examine some of its causes, and discuss techniques for avoiding contamination. It will also explore some key, simple strategies to monitor for contamination and prevent losses through careful culture management.

      This webinar will specifically focus on aseptic technique: developing a practical approach to aseptic technique; reducing day-to-day contamination problems in the lab; and helpful hints for avoiding contamination.

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    • iPSCs: The Future of Disease Research
      iPSCs: The Future of Disease Research Dr. Sharon Bahia, Product and Distributor Manager, The European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures (ECACC) Recorded: Nov 9 2017 4:00 pm UTC 36 mins
    • The development of human iPSC technology offers researchers the ability to more accurately generate physiologically relevant models of disease and normal tissues in the laboratory. Advances in iPSC generation have allowed many laboratories to make their own cell lines; however, researchers rarely have the resources needed to establish stocks, undertake quality control and share their own de novo iPSC cell lines with other laboratories. A pre-existing and established iPSC collection therefore allows iPSC researchers to obtain “off the shelf” access to a large, robust and reliable supply of iPS cell lines that represent diverse donor to donor variability and which include disease status normal controls and gene edited cell lines. iPSCs from ECACC are standardised and quality controlled and have the benefit of coming from a trusted and internationally recognised collection with worldwide distribution.

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    • Understanding the How’s and Why’s of Cell Culture Contamination and Ways to Avoi
      Understanding the How’s and Why’s of Cell Culture Contamination and Ways to Avoi Mark Rothenberg Recorded: Oct 23 2012 4:00 pm UTC 59 mins
    • Contamination of cell cultures, whether from bacteria, fungus, virus or other cell line is of critical importance to laboratory personnel. Studies have shown that at least 20% of the animal cultures in existence today are contaminated. Cell line contamination can result in decreased productivity, loss of critical study tools, impact data quality and reduce bioprocessing capacity. In hopes of helping to reduce this common problem, this tutorial will focus on:
      • Understanding the nature of contamination and its consequences.
      • Understanding the major sources and causes of cell culture contamination.
      • Discussing aseptic technique and its use in reducing day-to-day contamination.
      • A discussion on the use of antibiotics and their potential hidden dangers.
      • Simple methods to monitor for contamination and the importance in the use of cryopreserved cell lines.

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    • OncoCilAir™: A 3D human in vitro model for lung cancer research
      OncoCilAir™: A 3D human in vitro model for lung cancer research Samuel Constant, PhD, Co-founder, CEO Recorded: Nov 2 2017 2:00 pm UTC 38 mins
    • In this special webinar, our guest presenter Samuel Constant Ph.D., Co-founder, CEO for OncoTheis will review:

      - Novel in vitro tests for modelling lung cancer
      - A model that allows long term monitoring of toxicity or efficacy on respiratory tract
      - How OncoCilAir™ is a 3D human airway epithelium with tumors reconstituted in vitro

      Abstract:
      With more than 1 million deaths worldwide per year, lung cancer remains an area of unmet needs. Realistic human 3D models are required to improve preclinical predictivity. To that end, OncoTheis has engineered a novel in vitro lung cancer model, OncoCilAir™, which combines a functional reconstituted human airway epithelium, human lung fibroblasts and lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Because of its unique lifespan (>3 month) and its dual composition (healthy and cancerous human tissues), OncoCilAir™ allows for the concurrent testing of the efficacy of drug candidates against malignant cells and their non-toxicity against healthy tissues. Accordingly, a first proof of concept study performed on a panel of anti-cancer drugs including the investigational drugs selumetinib and Mekinist® demonstrated that OncoCilAir™ carrying the KRASG12S mutation showed responsiveness in agreement with first clinical reported results, validating this unique tissue model as a predictive tool for anticancer drug efficacy evaluation. OncoTheis has now extended the model to EGFR mutations. Results showed that OncoCilAir™ EGFRdel19 is sensitive to Tarceva® and Iressa® treatments and provides a useful model to decipher in vitro mechanisms of resistance.

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    • Factors to Consider When Choosing Cell-based Assays for Use with 3D Cultures
      Factors to Consider When Choosing Cell-based Assays for Use with 3D Cultures Terry Riss, Ph.D. Recorded: Dec 16 2014 5:00 pm UTC 60 mins
    • Join us for a special Corning sponsored webinar presented by Promega Corporation.

      Cells cultured in 3D model systems often acquire relatively large in vivo-like structures compared to the thickness of a 2D monolayer of cells grown on standard plastic plates. Multicellular 3D culture systems containing more than one cell type and exhibiting formation of a complex extracellular matrix represent a more physiologically relevant environment, yet provide a challenge for assay chemistries originally designed for measuring events from monolayers of cells. There is an unmet need for guidelines for design and verification of convenient and effective assays useful for larger 3D microtissues. Critical factors to consider for each model system and cell type include effective penetration of detection reagents and/or complete lysis of microtissue structures using combinations of detergent and physical disruption. We will present the approach used to verify performance of a bioluminescent ATP detection assay for measuring cell viability, a caspase assay for detecting apoptosis, and cell stress reporter assays to detect mechanisms leading to cytotoxicity. Recommendations for factors to consider when verifying performance of cell health assays on 3D culture models will be presented.

      Speaker Bio:

      Dr. Terry Riss started the Cell Biology program at Promega Corporation in 1990 and has since held several R&D and Project Management positions. Dr. Riss managed development of cell viability, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and protease assay systems and also led efforts to identify and promote multiplexing of cell-based assays to determine the mechanism of cell death. Dr. Riss now serves as Senior Product Specialist, Cell Health involved in outreach educational training activities including validating assay systems applied to 3D cell culture models.

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    • Growing Cell Line Potential: From Lab To Licence S1
      Growing Cell Line Potential: From Lab To Licence S1 Dr. Lily Chan, Cambridge Enterprise Recorded: Jun 9 2016 1:00 pm UTC 24 mins
    • A scientific overview of the portfolio of cell lines University of Cambridge has deposited at ECACC with a focus on the KARPAS 299 and KARPAS 422 cell lines; the HeLa Mitotrap cell lines; and CHO cell lines. We will also provide an overview of the process of partnering with ECACC and Sigma-Aldrich for the storage and distribution of cell lines for research purposes. Topics include: The scientific applications of the cell lines; The types of companies and institutions we license to; Advantages of partnering with culture experts and specialised distributors; Our experience of working with ECACC and Sigma-Aldrich.

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    • Growing Cell Line Potential: From Lab To Licence S2
      Growing Cell Line Potential: From Lab To Licence S2 Dr. Lily Chan, Cambridge Enterprise Recorded: Jun 9 2016 3:00 pm UTC 26 mins
    • A scientific overview of the portfolio of cell lines University of Cambridge has deposited at ECACC with a focus on the KARPAS 299 and KARPAS 422 cell lines; the HeLa Mitotrap cell lines; and CHO cell lines. We will also provide an overview of the process of partnering with ECACC and Sigma-Aldrich for the storage and distribution of cell lines for research purposes. Topics include: The scientific applications of the cell lines; The types of companies and institutions we license to; Advantages of partnering with culture experts and specialised distributors; Our experience of working with ECACC and Sigma-Aldrich.

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    • Surfaces for Organoid Culture
      Surfaces for Organoid Culture Nitin Kulkarni, Ph.D. Recorded: Feb 23 2017 5:00 pm UTC 50 mins
    • 3D culture is gaining pivotal importance for attaining in vivo-like conditions in a dish to study developmental cues as well as therapeutic possibilities. Organoid development promises to be one of the most important research tools in the near future. This presentation will cover:

      • Methodologies used in organoid culture
      • Matrices for growing organoids
      • Recovery of organoids for downstream applications

      Speaker Bio:

      Dr. Nitin Kulkarni is a member of the Scientific Support team at Corning Life Sciences. He has a Ph.D. in Biology and has worked on engineering transgenic mouse models for autoimmune diseases during his post-doctoral research at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, MA.
      In his current role, he supports researchers with applications related to cell culture including advanced surfaces and extracellular matrices, genomics, drug discovery and bioprocesses.

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    • How to Choose the Right Cell Line for Your Research (EMEA)
      How to Choose the Right Cell Line for Your Research (EMEA) Valerie Speirs, Professor of Experimental Pathology and Oncology, University of Leeds Recorded: Jun 25 2015 1:00 pm UTC 56 mins
    • Cell lines remain the workhorses of laboratory research, both in academic and industrial settings. This webinar will focus on best practice in selecting and maintaining cell lines for research, to ensure research outputs are relevant and reproducible. Features of cell lines that might be used in selection will be discussed. This will include monolayer or suspension culture; passage number; doubling time; immortalisation; karyotype; receptors; expression profiling and use of bioinformatics tools like the cancer cell line encyclopaedia. Using breast cancer as an exemplar, I will discuss more specifically how to choose the most relevant cell line model to address a particular research question. Finally I will describe how to use (and access) human material to help develop more clinically relevant cell culture systems to model human disease and the role that biobanks play in this process.

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    • How to Choose the Right Cell Line for Your Research NA
      How to Choose the Right Cell Line for Your Research NA Valerie Speirs, Professor of Experimental Pathology and Oncology, University of Leeds Recorded: Jun 25 2015 3:00 pm UTC 54 mins
    • Cell lines remain the workhorses of laboratory research, both in academic and industrial settings. This webinar will focus on best practice in selecting and maintaining cell lines for research, to ensure research outputs are relevant and reproducible. Features of cell lines that might be used in selection will be discussed. This will include monolayer or suspension culture; passage number; doubling time; immortalisation; karyotype; receptors; expression profiling and use of bioinformatics tools like the cancer cell line encyclopaedia. Using breast cancer as an exemplar, I will discuss more specifically how to choose the most relevant cell line model to address a particular research question. Finally I will describe how to use (and access) human material to help develop more clinically relevant cell culture systems to model human disease and the role that biobanks play in this process.

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    • Tips and Techniques for Culturing and Scaling-Up Primary Cells
      Tips and Techniques for Culturing and Scaling-Up Primary Cells Mark Rothenberg, Ph.D. Recorded: Nov 19 2014 5:00 pm UTC 59 mins
    • Primary cells can more closely mimic an in vivo-like state and generate more physiologically relevant data than immortalized cells. But unlike immortalized cells, primary cells have complex nutritional needs and require optimized growth conditions. In this webinar, you will learn:
      •Proven techniques for isolating primary cells from tissues
      •The importance of choosing the correct dissociation method
      •Troubleshooting techniques for culturing healthier primary cells.
      •Other topics to be discussed include:
      -Choosing the optimal cell culture surface
      -Selecting the optimal cell culture media 
      -Choosing the correct vessel for scaling-up

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