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    • NotPetya Attack - Cybercrime or Cyberwar?
      NotPetya Attack - Cybercrime or Cyberwar? Malcolm Harkins (Cylance), Erika Noerenberg (LogRhythm Labs), Nadir Izrael (Armis), Michael Landewe (Avanan) Recorded: Jul 12 2017 8:00 pm UTC 64 mins
    • The NotPetya pandemic that started in late June and disrupted the operations across companies, utilities, government agencies across France, Russia, Spain, Ukraine and the United States, happened just weeks after the WannaCry ransomware attack. Was NotPetya a financially motivated ransomware attack or an act of cyberwar?

      Join this interactive Q&A session with industry experts and find out the answers to your Petya/NotPetya questions. The topics up for discussion will include:
      - Difference between cybercrime and cyberwar
      - Industries targeted in the NotPetya attack
      - Short-term and long-term impact of this attack
      - Requirements and recommendations for strengthening cyber defense

      Speakers:
      - Malcolm Harkins, CSO of Cylance
      - Erika Noerenberg, Threat Research Engineer, LogRhythm Labs
      - Nadir Izrael, CTO of Armis

      Moderator:
      - Michael Landewe, Co- Founder of Avanan Cloud Security

      Read more >
    • NotPetya Attack - Cybercrime or Cyberwar?
      NotPetya Attack - Cybercrime or Cyberwar? Malcolm Harkins (Cylance), Erika Noerenberg (LogRhythm Labs), Nadir Izrael (Armis), Michael Landewe (Avanan) Recorded: Aug 4 2017 2:00 pm UTC 64 mins
    • The NotPetya pandemic that started in late June and disrupted the operations across companies, utilities, government agencies across France, Russia, Spain, Ukraine and the United States, happened just weeks after the WannaCry ransomware attack. Was NotPetya a financially motivated ransomware attack or an act of cyberwar?

      Watch this on-demand Q&A session with industry experts and hear answers to questions your peers have asked on the Petya/NotPetya pandemic.

      Topics include:
      - Difference between cybercrime and cyberwar
      - Industries targeted in the NotPetya attack
      - Short-term and long-term impact of this attack
      - Requirements and recommendations for strengthening cyber defense

      Speakers:
      - Malcolm Harkins, CSO of Cylance
      - Erika Noerenberg, Threat Research Engineer, LogRhythm Labs
      - Nadir Izrael, CTO of Armis

      Moderator:
      - Michael Landewe, Co- Founder of Avanan Cloud Security

      Read more >
    • Top U.S. Security Concerns Revealed - 2017 Unisys Security Index Survey Results
      Top U.S. Security Concerns Revealed - 2017 Unisys Security Index Survey Results Bill Searcy, Vice President for Global Justice, Law Enforcement, and Border Security Solutions, Unisys Recorded: Jul 27 2017 5:30 pm UTC 41 mins
    • U.S. consumers rate national security in relation to war or terrorism as their top security concern, though fears over viruses/malware and hacking are rising dramatically, according to the new Unisys Security Index™ that surveyed more than 13,000 consumers in April 2017 in 13 countries. This study, the only recurring snapshot of security concerns conducted globally, gauges the attitudes of consumers on a wide range of security-related issues.

      About the speaker:
      Bill Searcy is the Vice President for Global Justice, Law Enforcement, and Border Security Solutions. As a recognized law enforcement solutions expert, he is responsible for developing market strategies, overseeing delivery, ensuring customer satisfaction, and driving business performance to meet goals.​​
      During his 21-year career as a Special Agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Bill was recognized as an innovator who regularly sought new ways to use technology to solve complex problems. He is credited with leading numerous award winning IT initiatives, among them the FBI’s Grid Computing Initiative (Attorney General’s Award for Innovation) and the Next Generation Workstation (FBI Director’s Award).
      Prior to joining Unisys, Bill served as the Deputy Assistant Director of the FBI’s IT Infrastructure Division, where he was responsible for the engineering, development, deployment, and support of the FBI’s worldwide IT enterprise.
      A graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, Bill was commissioned as an officer in the U.S. Army where he commanded a Field Artillery battery. He went on to earn a Master of Science in Information Assurance from Norwich University and he is a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP).

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    • The Future of Cybersecurity Has Arrived – and the Bad Guys are in the Lead
      The Future of Cybersecurity Has Arrived – and the Bad Guys are in the Lead Jonathan Sander, VP of Product Strategy, Lieberman Software Recorded: Oct 4 2016 2:00 pm UTC 45 mins
    • The future of cybersecurity has already begun and the bad guys are in the lead. Automation is the first step to a future where attacks are not sporadic but constant. We’re exiting the musket era of cyberthreats and entering the semi-automatic age. The future will be constant carpet bombing. The only way good guys will keep up is by automating themselves and getting AI involved. The far future of cyberwar will be AIs fighting AIs, and humans will only be brought in when the AI needs help to make choices. Bad guys will get alerts when their AI manages to crack into that juicy target the AI was set after. Good guys will get alerted when the bad guy seems to have slipped through and been detected and choices about what assets to lose need to be made. The AIs will be more than the foot soldiers. Humans will be in the commander in chief role, but in the future just about every other role will be some form of AI which can do the millions of calculations per second to counter the constant bombardment with maximum automated efficiency.

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    • Catching "Wire-Bayas": Practical Kung-Fu to Detect Malware Traffic
      Catching "Wire-Bayas": Practical Kung-Fu to Detect Malware Traffic Ismael Valenzuela, Principal Architect - McAfee Foundstone Services EMEA Recorded: Mar 11 2014 11:00 am UTC 49 mins
    • BAYAS (Swahili word for 'badness' aka. malware of any kind, shape or form) continue to grow in number as script kiddies, hacktivists, organised crime and nation-state actors use them to deface websites, steal money, engage on cyber-warfare or "simply" to disrupt large businesses or nation-critical infrastructure.

      However, malicious software don't exist in a vacuum; any piece of malware is designed to call-back home sooner or later: to download additional malware, to report back to a C&C server or to exfiltrate data. How can Incident Responders detect hidden malware on the network using open-source tools and what patterns do they need to look for? In my webinar, I will share lessons learnt from practical traffic analysis in the field (i.e. predominate communication protocols, current trends, etc.) and present some effective techniques used to filter suspicious connections and investigate network data for traces of malware using tools like Wireshark, Snort and Bro.

      About the speaker:
      Ismael Valenzuela 13 years years experience in IT security and currently works as Principal Architect at McAfee Foundstone Services in EMEA. Author of security articles for Hakin9, INSECURE Magazine and the SANS Forensics Blog, Ismael also has experience teaching at BlackHat, serves on the GIAC Advisory Board and is a Community SANS Instructor for the Computer Forensics and Intrusion Detection tracks.

      He holds a bachelor's degree in computer science from the University of Malaga (Spain), is certified in Business Administration, and holds several professional certifications including. He is Lead Auditor from Bureau Veritas UK.

      Some of his articles are freely available at http://blog.ismaelvalenzuela.com.
      Mr. Valenzuela can be followed on twitter at @aboutsecurity

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