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    • Developing an effective program for hiring military personnel
      Developing an effective program for hiring military personnel Lisa Rosser, Founder of the Value Of a Veteran Recorded: Jun 14 2012 6:00 pm UTC 61 mins
    • Military members serve valiantly to protect our country, but they can also serve an essential role in your success. Unfortunately, however, many businesses do not effectively recruit and retain military personnel.

      In our upcoming webinar, we’ll help your company build a winning program for connecting with this unique and valuable segment of the workforce.

      Topics we'll cover include:

      - Major myths and misperceptions regarding military members and their skills
      - The facts you need to overcome resistance in your organization and pursue veteran applicants
      - The best resources for finding military talent across different skill sets
      - Practical ideas for integrating veteran outreach into your recruiting and marketing efforts
      - An explanation of the tax benefits, laws and regulations involved in hiring veterans
      - Insight into Military Occupational Codes (MOC's) so you can understand a resume written in "military-ese"

      Read more >
    • The Future of Aviation Search and Rescue
      The Future of Aviation Search and Rescue Christian Belleux, Aviation/Military Business Manager, McMurdo and Erwin White, North America Regional Manager, Aviation Recorded: May 20 2015 3:00 pm UTC 37 mins
    • Seven aircraft have been reported missing since 2000. This begs the question, “How is it possible to lose a plane in this day and age of advanced technology?”

      In this webinar thought leaders in the aviation community will share their views on the state of the aviation search and rescue industry including:

      • An overview of the various aviation-related search and rescue technologies and processes used today.

      • The challenges that exist to “find” the aircraft, to “predict” potential emergency situations, and to “communicate” for assistance while in the air before tragedy occurs.

      • A peek into the future convergence of today’s fragmented aviation systems and technologies including an update on various initiatives currently underway to improve aviation safety going forward.

      Join us as we share our ideas on how the aviation industry will evolve into a more comprehensive, connected, integrated aviation emergency “ecosystem” that will prevent emergencies, protect assets and, ultimately, save more lives.

      About Our Speakers:

      Christian Belleux is Aviation/Military Business Unit Manager of McMurdo Group. He has held various marketing and business development positions at Lucas Aerospace and Meggitt Aerospace. Christian has an engineering degree in Aerospace from ESTACA and a Masters in European and International Management from ESC Reims. He has also participated in the Boston Northeastern University International Business Program and the INSEAD European Marketing Program.

      Erwin White is McMurdo's new Aviation/Military North America Regional Manager. Erwin brings experience from his 10-year Air Force career, along with an additional 15 years of supporting combat aircraft projects, along with providing maintenance, advanced technologies, safety, and weapons systems development. He has worked directly with the B-52G Stratofortress, C-141B Starlifter, C-5B Galaxy, C-130 Hercules, and systems improvements on the F-15D Eagle, F-16 Fighting Falcon, and F-22 Raptor.

      Read more >
    • Veterans: A Workforce to Be Reckoned With
      Veterans: A Workforce to Be Reckoned With Greg Fenton and Lisa Schiller of ManpowerGroup Solutions and Marty Pisciotti and Jared Flynn of T-Mobile Recorded: Nov 16 2016 10:00 pm UTC 58 mins
    • More than 21 million military veterans live in the United States. Employers need to know veterans’ job search preferences and motivators for career change in order to attract and retain this valuable workforce.

      During this webinar, experts from ManpowerGroup Solutions and T-Mobile will discuss the how veterans can provide much-needed skills, veterans candidate preferences and talent acquisition strategies.

      By participating in this webinar, you will:
      1. Learn how the World of Work is changing and how veterans can provide valuable provide skills during an ever-growing talent shortage
      2. Identify how companies can implement or improve veterans hiring programs
      3. Gain insights from real-life examples of companies, such as T-Mobile, that are leading the industry and benefiting from veterans hiring programs

      Presented by Greg Fenton, Vice President, ManpowerGroup Solutions, and Military Veteran; Lisa Schiller, Vice President, ManpowerGroup Solutions; Marty Pisciotti, Vice President, Employee Careers, T-Mobile; and Jared Flynn, Head of Talent Acquisition, T-Mobile.

      * Please note that this webinar is not eligible for HRCI credit.

      Read more >
    • Leading and Developing a Veterans Sourcing Program
      Leading and Developing a Veterans Sourcing Program John Reynolds - Combat Veteran/Executive Director of Veterans2Work; Ted Elliott - Jobscience CEO Recorded: Feb 6 2014 6:00 pm UTC 45 mins
    • With over 1.2 million military service personnel returning home from overseas deployment over the next five years, the military veterans talent pool continues to grow and is becoming a “go to” source of hires to fill many skills-based needs of today’s top employers. John Reynolds, combat veteran of the Vietnam War and Executive Director of Veterans2Work, is joining forces with Ted Elliott, pioneer of CRM-based recruiting and Jobscience CEO, to empower you with the knowledge to elevate your organization from “Vet Friendly” to “Vet Strong”. John and Ted will share learning experiences and insights on:
      - The value of the military veterans talent pool
      - Translating Military Occupational Classification into its civilian counterpart
      - Creating a presence that draws veterans to your organization
      - Tools for effectively capturing, organizing, engaging and assessing veteran talent
      - Important knowledge-based resources about military veterans

      Read more >
    • APT 28: At the Center of the Storm
      APT 28: At the Center of the Storm Robert Morgus, Policy Analyst, Cybersecurity Initiative, New America; Christopher Porter & John Hultquist, FireEye Recorded: Mar 28 2017 3:30 pm UTC 49 mins
    • Join FireEye in discussing our latest report on the Russia-based cyber threat group APT28 - APT28: At the Center of the Storm. FireEye first publicly announced that the Russian government likely sponsors APT28 in a report released in October 2014. APT28 has pursued military and political targets in the U.S. and globally, including U.S. political organizations, anti-doping agencies, NGOs, foreign and defense ministries, defense attaches, media outlets, and high profile government and private sector entities.

      Since at least 2007, APT28 has conducted operations using a sophisticated set of malware that employs a flexible, modular framework allowing APT28 to consistently evolve its toolset for future operations. APT28’s operations closely align with Russian military interests and the 2016 breaches, and pursuant public data leaks demonstrate the Russian government's wide-ranging approach to advancing its strategic political interests.

      Register today to gain deeper insights into this threat group!

      Read more >
    • Global Helicopters Market Opportunities- Platforms, SiS & Systems
      Global Helicopters Market Opportunities- Platforms, SiS & Systems Alix Leboulanger, Research Analyst Frost & Sullivan Recorded: Oct 30 2013 4:00 pm UTC 44 mins
    • Despite economic constraints, the helicopter industry will witness sunny spells with future procurement programs across emerging markets, significant aftermarket support growth opportunities among Western regions through platform life extension, and next-gen helicopters to reinvigorate end-users' appetites. This briefing will highlight new mission requirements for helicopters and focus on implications at the system level.
      Why should you attend this briefing?
      - Discover helicopter growth potential by end-user segments
      - Understand the main challenges to occur in the next decade
      - Identify opportunities across the value chain, from new procurements, to upgrades, to aftermarket support to next-gen systems
      - Participate in an interactive Q&A session

      Read more >
    • Using Microservices & APIs to Revolutionize Digital Healthcare: A Case Study
      Using Microservices & APIs to Revolutionize Digital Healthcare: A Case Study Matt Serna; Nial Darbey; Joydip Homchowdhury; Jon Duke; Steve Rushing Recorded: Apr 11 2017 3:00 pm UTC 64 mins
    • In the United States, the Department of Veterans Affairs is responsible for providing healthcare and other services for over 21 million veterans. Currently, veteran data and health records are housed in a variety of distinct, complex systems, each holding discrete records of veteran interactions with military, community, and VA health teams.

      The Digital Health Platform (DHP) strategy, developed in partnership with the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), calls for a cloud-based technology platform integrating Veteran data from VA, military and commercial electronic health records (EHRs), applications, devices and wearables to a Veteran’s healthcare team in real-time.

      Delivering on their vision required the adoption of a composable architecture, using APIs to abstract away complexity from EHRs into discrete units of business capabilities, represented via microservices. In this webinar, the DHP team will present methodology and technology insights drawn from the public-private collaboration that built the proof-of-concept, and share the role MuleSoft’s Anypoint Platform helping enable this vision.

      Attendees will learn:

      - Why EHRs on their own are insufficient to meet modern interoperability requirements
      - How APIs can be used to unlock and orchestrate healthcare data for cloud application consumption
      - Why microservices can increase IT agility for both government agencies and private sector companies
      - How the Digital Health Platform leverages MuleSoft’s Anypoint Platform to improve care delivery for veterans
      - What organizations outside healthcare or government can learn from this digital transformation approach

      Read more >
    • Conducive Environments for Successful Threat Hunting (Hunter Spotlight)
      Conducive Environments for Successful Threat Hunting (Hunter Spotlight) Jason Smith, Security Operations Investigator Manager at Cisco Recorded: May 24 2017 6:00 pm UTC 32 mins
    • Veteran threat hunter Jason Smith will detail:
      • How to structure your Security Operations Center (SOC) and network to help uncover hidden threats
      • Best practices to make hunting data accessible and fluid
      • Essential tools and tips from Jason's hunting experiences

      About the hunter:
      Jason Smith has a background in physics and has built everything from particle
      accelerators to explosive neutralizing robots used by the military. He has worked in multiple US Department of Defense SOCs and has worked with the largest security vendors to operationalize security in the world's largest
      organizations. Jason co-wrote Applied Network Security Monitoring and maintains the open source project FlowBAT, a graphical flow data analysis tool. Jason currently works remotely for Cisco from his home in Nashville, TN.

      Read more >
    • Defense One Tech Summit: From DARPA to Daesh
      Defense One Tech Summit: From DARPA to Daesh Defense One Recorded: Jun 10 2016 3:40 pm UTC 39 mins
    • The battle for innovation has begun.
      Join Defense Secretary Ash Carter and some of the brightest minds in military and consumer technology to discuss the future of innovation and national security at the first-ever Defense One Tech Summit.

      Something new is in the air. A mix of excitement and apprehension has emerged from the Defense Department’s deliberate outreach to Silicon Valley and the tech world. Stakeholders from Washington to Palo Alto are abuzz about a new era in public-private partnership. It all comes as global terrorism reaches European cities and American shores, and as Western governments navigate a re-emergence of superpower geopolitics. Carter has put the call out — for patriotism, good governance, and national security: the Pentagon wants you.

      But the conversation is far deeper than hoodied hackers and high-and-tight commanders exchanging wary glances. The longtime partnership between defense and tech is entering a new era. After World War II, the U.S. government, led by the military, contributed two-thirds of every dollar that went to science and technology research, the private sector just one-third. Those numbers have flipped.

      Every day, tech industry giants and charismatic entrepreneurs seize territory that used to be the sole domain of the government, from robotics and autonomy to cloud computing and space conquest. The military has taken notice, outsourcing more and more innovation to private-sector players.

      Now is the time to take stock, exchange ideas, and see what comes next. Now is the time for the Defense One Tech Summit.

      Read more >
    • Defense One Tech Summit: Defending Defense Networks
      Defense One Tech Summit: Defending Defense Networks Defense One Recorded: Jun 10 2016 3:35 pm UTC 30 mins
    • The battle for innovation has begun.
      Join Defense Secretary Ash Carter and some of the brightest minds in military and consumer technology to discuss the future of innovation and national security at the first-ever Defense One Tech Summit.

      Something new is in the air. A mix of excitement and apprehension has emerged from the Defense Department’s deliberate outreach to Silicon Valley and the tech world. Stakeholders from Washington to Palo Alto are abuzz about a new era in public-private partnership. It all comes as global terrorism reaches European cities and American shores, and as Western governments navigate a re-emergence of superpower geopolitics. Carter has put the call out — for patriotism, good governance, and national security: the Pentagon wants you.

      But the conversation is far deeper than hoodied hackers and high-and-tight commanders exchanging wary glances. The longtime partnership between defense and tech is entering a new era. After World War II, the U.S. government, led by the military, contributed two-thirds of every dollar that went to science and technology research, the private sector just one-third. Those numbers have flipped.

      Every day, tech industry giants and charismatic entrepreneurs seize territory that used to be the sole domain of the government, from robotics and autonomy to cloud computing and space conquest. The military has taken notice, outsourcing more and more innovation to private-sector players.

      Now is the time to take stock, exchange ideas, and see what comes next. Now is the time for the Defense One Tech Summit.

      Read more >
    • Defense One Tech Summit: NSA and the Future of Intelligence Technology
      Defense One Tech Summit: NSA and the Future of Intelligence Technology Defense One Recorded: Jun 10 2016 3:40 pm UTC 26 mins
    • The battle for innovation has begun.
      Join Defense Secretary Ash Carter and some of the brightest minds in military and consumer technology to discuss the future of innovation and national security at the first-ever Defense One Tech Summit.

      Something new is in the air. A mix of excitement and apprehension has emerged from the Defense Department’s deliberate outreach to Silicon Valley and the tech world. Stakeholders from Washington to Palo Alto are abuzz about a new era in public-private partnership. It all comes as global terrorism reaches European cities and American shores, and as Western governments navigate a re-emergence of superpower geopolitics. Carter has put the call out — for patriotism, good governance, and national security: the Pentagon wants you.

      But the conversation is far deeper than hoodied hackers and high-and-tight commanders exchanging wary glances. The longtime partnership between defense and tech is entering a new era. After World War II, the U.S. government, led by the military, contributed two-thirds of every dollar that went to science and technology research, the private sector just one-third. Those numbers have flipped.

      Every day, tech industry giants and charismatic entrepreneurs seize territory that used to be the sole domain of the government, from robotics and autonomy to cloud computing and space conquest. The military has taken notice, outsourcing more and more innovation to private-sector players.

      Now is the time to take stock, exchange ideas, and see what comes next. Now is the time for the Defense One Tech Summit.

      Read more >
    • Defense One Tech Summit: Challenges to Connecting
      Defense One Tech Summit: Challenges to Connecting Defense One Recorded: Jun 10 2016 3:40 pm UTC 30 mins
    • The battle for innovation has begun.
      Join Defense Secretary Ash Carter and some of the brightest minds in military and consumer technology to discuss the future of innovation and national security at the first-ever Defense One Tech Summit.

      Something new is in the air. A mix of excitement and apprehension has emerged from the Defense Department’s deliberate outreach to Silicon Valley and the tech world. Stakeholders from Washington to Palo Alto are abuzz about a new era in public-private partnership. It all comes as global terrorism reaches European cities and American shores, and as Western governments navigate a re-emergence of superpower geopolitics. Carter has put the call out — for patriotism, good governance, and national security: the Pentagon wants you.

      But the conversation is far deeper than hoodied hackers and high-and-tight commanders exchanging wary glances. The longtime partnership between defense and tech is entering a new era. After World War II, the U.S. government, led by the military, contributed two-thirds of every dollar that went to science and technology research, the private sector just one-third. Those numbers have flipped.

      Every day, tech industry giants and charismatic entrepreneurs seize territory that used to be the sole domain of the government, from robotics and autonomy to cloud computing and space conquest. The military has taken notice, outsourcing more and more innovation to private-sector players.

      Now is the time to take stock, exchange ideas, and see what comes next. Now is the time for the Defense One Tech Summit.

      Read more >
    • Defense One Tech Summit: New Wars, New Business, New Tech
      Defense One Tech Summit: New Wars, New Business, New Tech Defense One Recorded: Jun 10 2016 3:35 pm UTC 27 mins
    • The battle for innovation has begun.
      Join Defense Secretary Ash Carter and some of the brightest minds in military and consumer technology to discuss the future of innovation and national security at the first-ever Defense One Tech Summit.

      Something new is in the air. A mix of excitement and apprehension has emerged from the Defense Department’s deliberate outreach to Silicon Valley and the tech world. Stakeholders from Washington to Palo Alto are abuzz about a new era in public-private partnership. It all comes as global terrorism reaches European cities and American shores, and as Western governments navigate a re-emergence of superpower geopolitics. Carter has put the call out — for patriotism, good governance, and national security: the Pentagon wants you.

      But the conversation is far deeper than hoodied hackers and high-and-tight commanders exchanging wary glances. The longtime partnership between defense and tech is entering a new era. After World War II, the U.S. government, led by the military, contributed two-thirds of every dollar that went to science and technology research, the private sector just one-third. Those numbers have flipped.

      Every day, tech industry giants and charismatic entrepreneurs seize territory that used to be the sole domain of the government, from robotics and autonomy to cloud computing and space conquest. The military has taken notice, outsourcing more and more innovation to private-sector players.

      Now is the time to take stock, exchange ideas, and see what comes next. Now is the time for the Defense One Tech Summit.

      Read more >
    • Defense One Tech Summit: Mission Critical
      Defense One Tech Summit: Mission Critical Defense One Recorded: Jun 10 2016 3:45 pm UTC 59 mins
    • The battle for innovation has begun.
      Join Defense Secretary Ash Carter and some of the brightest minds in military and consumer technology to discuss the future of innovation and national security at the first-ever Defense One Tech Summit.

      Something new is in the air. A mix of excitement and apprehension has emerged from the Defense Department’s deliberate outreach to Silicon Valley and the tech world. Stakeholders from Washington to Palo Alto are abuzz about a new era in public-private partnership. It all comes as global terrorism reaches European cities and American shores, and as Western governments navigate a re-emergence of superpower geopolitics. Carter has put the call out — for patriotism, good governance, and national security: the Pentagon wants you.

      But the conversation is far deeper than hoodied hackers and high-and-tight commanders exchanging wary glances. The longtime partnership between defense and tech is entering a new era. After World War II, the U.S. government, led by the military, contributed two-thirds of every dollar that went to science and technology research, the private sector just one-third. Those numbers have flipped.

      Every day, tech industry giants and charismatic entrepreneurs seize territory that used to be the sole domain of the government, from robotics and autonomy to cloud computing and space conquest. The military has taken notice, outsourcing more and more innovation to private-sector players.

      Now is the time to take stock, exchange ideas, and see what comes next. Now is the time for the Defense One Tech Summit.

      Read more >
    • Defense One Tech Summit: Venturing into National Security
      Defense One Tech Summit: Venturing into National Security Defense One Recorded: Jun 10 2016 3:05 pm UTC 26 mins
    • The battle for innovation has begun.
      Join Defense Secretary Ash Carter and some of the brightest minds in military and consumer technology to discuss the future of innovation and national security at the first-ever Defense One Tech Summit.

      Something new is in the air. A mix of excitement and apprehension has emerged from the Defense Department’s deliberate outreach to Silicon Valley and the tech world. Stakeholders from Washington to Palo Alto are abuzz about a new era in public-private partnership. It all comes as global terrorism reaches European cities and American shores, and as Western governments navigate a re-emergence of superpower geopolitics. Carter has put the call out — for patriotism, good governance, and national security: the Pentagon wants you.

      But the conversation is far deeper than hoodied hackers and high-and-tight commanders exchanging wary glances. The longtime partnership between defense and tech is entering a new era. After World War II, the U.S. government, led by the military, contributed two-thirds of every dollar that went to science and technology research, the private sector just one-third. Those numbers have flipped.

      Every day, tech industry giants and charismatic entrepreneurs seize territory that used to be the sole domain of the government, from robotics and autonomy to cloud computing and space conquest. The military has taken notice, outsourcing more and more innovation to private-sector players.

      Now is the time to take stock, exchange ideas, and see what comes next. Now is the time for the Defense One Tech Summit.

      Read more >
    • Defense One Tech Summit: Super Soldiers
      Defense One Tech Summit: Super Soldiers Defense One Recorded: Jun 10 2016 3:30 pm UTC 36 mins
    • The battle for innovation has begun.
      Join Defense Secretary Ash Carter and some of the brightest minds in military and consumer technology to discuss the future of innovation and national security at the first-ever Defense One Tech Summit.

      Something new is in the air. A mix of excitement and apprehension has emerged from the Defense Department’s deliberate outreach to Silicon Valley and the tech world. Stakeholders from Washington to Palo Alto are abuzz about a new era in public-private partnership. It all comes as global terrorism reaches European cities and American shores, and as Western governments navigate a re-emergence of superpower geopolitics. Carter has put the call out — for patriotism, good governance, and national security: the Pentagon wants you.

      But the conversation is far deeper than hoodied hackers and high-and-tight commanders exchanging wary glances. The longtime partnership between defense and tech is entering a new era. After World War II, the U.S. government, led by the military, contributed two-thirds of every dollar that went to science and technology research, the private sector just one-third. Those numbers have flipped.

      Every day, tech industry giants and charismatic entrepreneurs seize territory that used to be the sole domain of the government, from robotics and autonomy to cloud computing and space conquest. The military has taken notice, outsourcing more and more innovation to private-sector players.

      Now is the time to take stock, exchange ideas, and see what comes next. Now is the time for the Defense One Tech Summit.

      Read more >
    • Defense One Tech Summit 2016 Livestream
      Defense One Tech Summit 2016 Livestream Presented by: Defense One | Underwritten by: Booz Allen Hamilton Recorded: Jun 10 2016 12:00 pm UTC 243 mins
    • The battle for innovation has begun.
      Join Defense Secretary Ash Carter and some of the brightest minds in military and consumer technology to discuss the future of innovation and national security at the first-ever Defense One Tech Summit.

      Something new is in the air. A mix of excitement and apprehension has emerged from the Defense Department’s deliberate outreach to Silicon Valley and the tech world. Stakeholders from Washington to Palo Alto are abuzz about a new era in public-private partnership. It all comes as global terrorism reaches European cities and American shores, and as Western governments navigate a re-emergence of superpower geopolitics. Carter has put the call out — for patriotism, good governance, and national security: the Pentagon wants you.

      But the conversation is far deeper than hoodied hackers and high-and-tight commanders exchanging wary glances. The longtime partnership between defense and tech is entering a new era. After World War II, the U.S. government, led by the military, contributed two-thirds of every dollar that went to science and technology research, the private sector just one-third. Those numbers have flipped.

      Every day, tech industry giants and charismatic entrepreneurs seize territory that used to be the sole domain of the government, from robotics and autonomy to cloud computing and space conquest. The military has taken notice, outsourcing more and more innovation to private-sector players.

      Now is the time to take stock, exchange ideas, and see what comes next. Now is the time for the Defense One Tech Summit.

      Read more >
    • Defense One Tech Summit 2016 Livestream
      Defense One Tech Summit 2016 Livestream Presented by: Defense One | Underwritten by: Booz Allen Hamilton Recorded: Jun 10 2016 4:05 pm UTC 132 mins
    • The battle for innovation has begun.
      Join Defense Secretary Ash Carter and some of the brightest minds in military and consumer technology to discuss the future of innovation and national security at the first-ever Defense One Tech Summit.

      Something new is in the air. A mix of excitement and apprehension has emerged from the Defense Department’s deliberate outreach to Silicon Valley and the tech world. Stakeholders from Washington to Palo Alto are abuzz about a new era in public-private partnership. It all comes as global terrorism reaches European cities and American shores, and as Western governments navigate a re-emergence of superpower geopolitics. Carter has put the call out — for patriotism, good governance, and national security: the Pentagon wants you.

      But the conversation is far deeper than hoodied hackers and high-and-tight commanders exchanging wary glances. The longtime partnership between defense and tech is entering a new era. After World War II, the U.S. government, led by the military, contributed two-thirds of every dollar that went to science and technology research, the private sector just one-third. Those numbers have flipped.

      Every day, tech industry giants and charismatic entrepreneurs seize territory that used to be the sole domain of the government, from robotics and autonomy to cloud computing and space conquest. The military has taken notice, outsourcing more and more innovation to private-sector players.

      Now is the time to take stock, exchange ideas, and see what comes next. Now is the time for the Defense One Tech Summit.

      Read more >