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Introduction to Air Monitoring

Whether your laboratory uses passive sampling, or active air sampling, this webinar will run through the basics of air monitoring, giving some advice on the best equipment to use for your laboratories application.
Recorded Jun 19 2012 60 mins
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Presented by
Mr Klaus Buckendahl, European Tactical Marketing Manager, Sample Handling
Presentation preview: Introduction to Air Monitoring

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  • Title: Introduction to Air Monitoring
  • Live at: Jun 19 2012 9:00 am
  • Presented by: Mr Klaus Buckendahl, European Tactical Marketing Manager, Sample Handling
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