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How e-marking can improve the security of exam marking

Exam security breaches have consequences for all parties involved in the assessment process and beyond: reputational damage for educational institutions, impact on student life chances, extra work for examiners due to increasing number of students having to retake exams, and impact on society because some exam results can decide on a person’s ability to practice a profession.

Examination boards and exam regulators across the world are implementing various strategies to deal with exam security breaches.

- An African examination council is planning to install more CCTV cameras in its examination halls, use composite answer booklets, synchronise the time for the start of papers across all member countries and use metal detectors to search candidates.
- An examination board in India is planning to improve exam security by embedding GPS-enabled micro-chips on the sealed envelopes containing the question papers. If the seal is broken, the data will be passed on to the server at the control room at the board’s office.
- An exam regulator in Europe is looking to combat malpractice offences committed by staff by preventing teachers from teaching topics for which they had been involved in developing the exam.

All of these measures are meant to reduce security breaches in exam rooms, but what happens after exams are taken, and how you can make sure your exam marking is secure and examination results reflect the candidate's ability?

Join our webinar to find out:

- Which areas in the assessment process are the most exposed to security breaches
- The areas where security breached can occur: intercepting of scripts and amending the content or the marks, amending returned scripts, bribing examiners and administrators, breaching of exam content, conflict of interest, invigilation breaches and cheating
- Security measures that e-marking solutions can provide
Recorded May 17 2018 34 mins
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Presented by
Stuart Mason- Head of Customer Acquisition and Martin Adams - Senior Business Analyst at RM Results
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  • How e-marking can improve the security of exam marking Recorded: May 17 2018 34 mins
    Stuart Mason- Head of Customer Acquisition and Martin Adams - Senior Business Analyst at RM Results
    Exam security breaches have consequences for all parties involved in the assessment process and beyond: reputational damage for educational institutions, impact on student life chances, extra work for examiners due to increasing number of students having to retake exams, and impact on society because some exam results can decide on a person’s ability to practice a profession.

    Examination boards and exam regulators across the world are implementing various strategies to deal with exam security breaches.

    - An African examination council is planning to install more CCTV cameras in its examination halls, use composite answer booklets, synchronise the time for the start of papers across all member countries and use metal detectors to search candidates.
    - An examination board in India is planning to improve exam security by embedding GPS-enabled micro-chips on the sealed envelopes containing the question papers. If the seal is broken, the data will be passed on to the server at the control room at the board’s office.
    - An exam regulator in Europe is looking to combat malpractice offences committed by staff by preventing teachers from teaching topics for which they had been involved in developing the exam.

    All of these measures are meant to reduce security breaches in exam rooms, but what happens after exams are taken, and how you can make sure your exam marking is secure and examination results reflect the candidate's ability?

    Join our webinar to find out:

    - Which areas in the assessment process are the most exposed to security breaches
    - The areas where security breached can occur: intercepting of scripts and amending the content or the marks, amending returned scripts, bribing examiners and administrators, breaching of exam content, conflict of interest, invigilation breaches and cheating
    - Security measures that e-marking solutions can provide
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  • How e-marking can improve the quality assurance of exam marking Recorded: Jul 20 2017 45 mins
    Martin Adams - Senior Business Analyst, Annie Mehmet - Account Director, Steve Harrington - Account Director at RM Results
    Marking quality is one of the biggest challenges faced by awarding bodies and professional organisations around the world.

    Poor or inconsistent exam marking has consequences for all parties involved in the process: impact on student life chances, reputational damage for awarding bodies and professional organisations, and extra work for examiners due to increasing numbers of re-marking requests.

    One awarding body found that 14% of the paper forms used to manually record marks were filled out incorrectly each year. Moreover, 10% of the traditionally marked exam papers were subject to enquiry and the majority had their marks changed. Other countries, such as India, Poland, Slovenia and the Caribbean have faced the same challenge and have started transitioning to online marking systems to improve the quality of their exam marking.

    From this webinar you will find out:
    • What are the key exam marking challenges faced by awarding bodies and professional organisations around the world
    • What the most common paper-based marking errors and biases are, and how e-marking can help you reduce them: transcription and addition errors, halo effect, cultural, gender and centre biases
    • What quality control models are available in e-marking solutions: seeding, double marking, multiple marking, item-level marking
    • What monitoring and communication tools are available in e-marking solutions that help to improve marking quality

    Is marking quality one of your key challenges? Could you do more as an awarding body to remove marking bias, inconsistencies and errors?

    If you want to find out how e-marking can help you improve the quality of your exam marking, join our webinar on Thursday 20th July at 6pm BST (GMT+1).
  • How e-marking can improve the quality assurance of exam marking Recorded: Jul 19 2017 45 mins
    Martin Adams - Senior Business Analyst, Annie Mehmet - Account Director, Steve Harrington - Account Director, RM Results
    Marking quality is one of the biggest challenges faced by awarding bodies and professional organisations around the world.

    Poor or inconsistent exam marking has consequences for all parties involved in the process: impact on student life chances, reputational damage for awarding bodies and professional organisations, and extra work for examiners due to increasing numbers of re-marking requests.

    One awarding body found that 14% of the paper forms used to manually record marks were filled out incorrectly each year. Moreover, 10% of the traditionally marked exam papers were subject to enquiry and the majority had their marks changed. Other countries, such as India, Poland, Slovenia and the Caribbean have faced the same challenge and have started transitioning to online marking systems to improve the quality of their exam marking.

    From this webinar you will find out:
    • What are the key exam marking challenges faced by awarding bodies and professional organisations around the world
    • What the most common paper-based marking errors and biases are, and how e-marking can help you reduce them: transcription and addition errors, halo effect, cultural, gender and centre biases
    • What quality control models are available in e-marking solutions: seeding, double marking, multiple marking, item-level marking
    • What monitoring and communication tools are available in e-marking solutions that help to improve marking quality

    Is marking quality one of your key challenges? Could you do more as an awarding body to remove marking bias, inconsistencies and errors?
    If you want to find out how e-marking can help you improve the quality of your exam marking, join our webinar.

    First three people to register and attend the webinar will receive a pack of our latest e-assessment whitepapers, reports and more.
Webcasts for education bodies looking to improve their exam marking.
Webcasts on key global exam marking challenges and how to overcome them with the help of e-marking.

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  • Live at: May 17 2018 9:00 am
  • Presented by: Stuart Mason- Head of Customer Acquisition and Martin Adams - Senior Business Analyst at RM Results
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