How to Become a Successful Researcher At Every Stage of Your Career

Presented by

Dr. Valentin Fuster, Editor-in-Chief, JACC & Dr. Harlan Krumholz, Cardiologist & Health Care Researcher at Yale University

About this talk

Pursuing a career as a physician-scientist can be daunting, especially as the success rates for securing research grants has declined from 33% to 19%, while the number of grant applications has increased by 72%. However, the pathway can provide personal and professional fulfillment and dynamism, if the individual is equipped with a roadmap for success. Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, MACC, editor in chief of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), and Harlan M. Krumholz, MD, SM, FACC, director of the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation at Yale School of Medicine, will discuss how to maintain a successful physician-scientist career at three stages: early career, mid-career and senior. They will include tips for grant receipts, the importance of the mentee/mentorship relationship, and the need for creativity in grant submissions. In addition, viewers will have the opportunity to ask these thought leaders questions and pointers. About the presenters: Dr. Valentin Fuster serves The Mount Sinai Hospital as Physician-in-Chief, as well as Director of Mount Sinai Heart, the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health. He is also the Richard Gorlin, MD/Heart Research Foundation Professor, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Dr. Harlan Krumholz is a cardiologist and health care researcher at Yale University and Yale New Haven Hospital. He also serves as Director of the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) at Yale School of Medicine. Learn more about the JACC family of journals at JACC.org.

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