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Considerations for Accurately Measuring Solid State Systems

Measuring performance of Solid State requires different approaches, tools and methodologies to accurately model characteristics of the data sets, access patterns, and data streams. The SNIA Solid State Storage System (S4) TWG was created for the purpose of addressing the unique performance behavior of solid state storage systems. Join Leah and Peter as they provide the guidelines that are vendor agnostic and will support all major solid state storage system technologies.
Recorded Apr 21 2015 47 mins
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Presented by
Leah Schoeb, Sr. Partner & Analyst, Evaluator Group; Peter Murray, Technical Evangelist, Load DynamiX
Presentation preview: Considerations for Accurately Measuring Solid State Systems

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    Building a cloud storage architecture requires both storage vendors, cloud service providers and large enterprises to consider new technical and economic paradigms in order to enable a flexible and cost efficient architecture.

    Economic:
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    Technical:
    Clouds inherently require often unpredictable scalability – both up and down. Building a storage architecture with the ability to rapidly allocate resources for a specific customer need and reallocate resources based on changing customer requirements allows the cloud service provider to optimize storage capacity and performance pools in their data center without compromising the responsiveness to the change in needs. Such architecture should also align to the datacenter level orchestration system to allow for even higher level of resource optimization and flexibility.

    In this webcast, you will learn:
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    •The role of software defined storage
    •Accounting principles
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    · Impact of technology changes such as Cloud
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    Join to hear the following questions addressed:

    •Both RoCE and iWARP support RDMA over Ethernet, but what are the differences?
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    What new security requirements apply to Persistent Memory (PM)? While many existing security practices such as access control, encryption, multi-tenancy and key management apply to persistent memory, new security threats may result from the differences between PM and storage technologies. The SNIA PM security threat model provides a starting place for exposing system behavior, protocol and implementation security gaps that are specific to PM. This in turn motivates industry groups such as TCG and JEDEC to standardize methods of completing the PM security solution space.
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    Eric Lakin, University of Michigan; Michelle Tidwell, IBM; Alex McDonald, NetApp
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    •Do they perform differently?
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  • Everything You Wanted To Know...But Were Too Proud To Ask - Storage Controllers Recorded: May 15 2018 48 mins
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    Are you a control freak? Have you ever wondered what was the difference between a storage controller, a RAID controller, a PCIe Controller, or a metadata controller? What about an NVMe controller? Aren’t they all the same thing?

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    After you watch the webcast, check out the Q&A blog at http://bit.ly/2JgcHlM
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    You won’t want to miss the opportunity to hear leading data storage experts provide their insights on prominent technologies that are shaping the market. With the exponential rise in demand for high capacity and secured storage systems, it’s critical to understand the key factors influencing adoption and where the highest growth is expected. From SSDs and HDDs to storage interfaces and NAND devices, get the latest information you need to shape key strategic directions and remain competitive.
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    Mark Carlson, Toshiba, Alex McDonald, NetApp, Saqib Jang, Chelsio, John Kim, Mellanox
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    Block
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    As a Director of Product Marketing at SMART Modular Technologies. Arthur has been driving new product launch and business development activities at SMART since 1998. Prior to Smart, Arthur worked as a product manager at Hitachi Semiconductor America. While there, his focus was on DRAM, SRAM and Flash technologies.

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    Because, FCoE also delivers increasing performance as Ethernet speeds increase – and, Fibre Channel also delivers increasing performance as FC speeds increase. Historically, FC delivered speed bumps at a more rapid interval (2x bumps), while Ethernet delivered their speed bumps at a slower pace (10x bumps), but that has changed recently with Ethernet adding 2.5G, 5G, 25G, 40G, and 50G to the traditional 1G, 10G, 100G timeline.

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SNIA
The Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA) is a non-profit organization made up of member companies spanning information technology. A globally recognized and trusted authority, SNIA’s mission is to lead the storage industry in developing and promoting vendor-neutral architectures, standards and educational services that facilitate the efficient management, movement and security of information.

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  • Title: Considerations for Accurately Measuring Solid State Systems
  • Live at: Apr 21 2015 3:00 pm
  • Presented by: Leah Schoeb, Sr. Partner & Analyst, Evaluator Group; Peter Murray, Technical Evangelist, Load DynamiX
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