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Storage Performance Benchmarking: Workloads

Benchmarking storage performance is both an art and a science. In this 5th installment of the SNIA Ethernet Storage Forum’s “Storage Performance Benchmarking” series, our experts take on optimizing performance for various workloads. Attendees will gain an understanding of workload profiles and their characteristics for common Independent Software Vendor (ISV) applications and learn how to identify application workloads based on I/O profiles to better understand the implications on storage architectures and design patterns. This webcast will cover:
•An introduction to benchmarking storage performance of workloads
•Workload characteristics
•Common Workloads (OLTP, OLAP, VMware, etc.)
•Graph fun!

After you watch the webcast, check out the Q&A blog http://bit.ly/2GME6OR
Recorded Feb 14 2018 57 mins
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Presented by
Mark Rogov, Dell EMC, Chris Conniff, Dell EMC, Tim Lustig, Mellanox
Presentation preview: Storage Performance Benchmarking: Workloads

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  • Introduction to Incast, Head of Line Blocking, and Congestion Management Jun 18 2019 5:00 pm UTC 75 mins
    Howard Johnson, Broadcom; J Metz, Cisco; Tim Lustig, Mellanox
    For a long time, the architecture and best practices of storage networks have been relatively well-understood. Recently, however, advanced capabilities have been added to storage that could have broader impacts on networks than we think.

    The three main storage network transports - Fibre Channel, Ethernet, and InfiniBand – all have mechanisms to handle increased traffic, but they are not all affected or implemented the same way. For instance, placing a protocol such as NVMe over Fabrics can mean very different things when looking at one networking method in comparison to another.

    Unfortunately, many network administrators may not understand how different storage solutions place burdens upon their networks. As more storage traffic traverses the network, customers face the risk of congestion leading to higher-than-expected latencies and lower-than expected throughput. Watch this webinar to learn:

    •Typical storage traffic patterns
    •What is Incast, what is head of line blocking, what is congestion, what is a slow drain, and when do these become problems on a network?
    •How Ethernet, Fibre Channel, InfiniBand handle these effects
    •The proper role of buffers in handling storage network traffic
    •Potential new ways to handle increasing storage traffic loads on the network
  • Everything You Wanted to Know...But Were Too Proud to Ask - The Memory Pod May 16 2019 5:00 pm UTC 75 mins
    Alan Bumgarner, Intel; Alex McDonald, NetApp; John Kim, Mellanox
    Traditionally, much of the IT infrastructure that we’ve built over the years can be divided fairly simply into storage (the place we save our persistent data), network (how we get access to the storage and get at our data) and compute (memory and CPU that crunches on the data). In fact, so successful has this model been that a trip to any cloud services provider allows you to order (and be billed for) exactly these three components.

    We build effective systems in a cost-optimal way by using appropriate quantities of expensive and fast memory (DRAM for instance) to cache our cheaper and slower storage. But currently fast memory has no persistence at all; it’s only storage that provides the application the guarantee that storing, modifying or deleting data does exactly that.

    Memory and storage differ in other ways. For example, we load from memory to registers on the CPU, perform operations there, and then store the results back to memory by using byte addresses. This load/store technology is different from storage, where we tend to move data back and fore between memory and storage in large blocks, by using an API (application programming interface).

    New memory technologies are challenging these assumptions. They look like storage in that they’re persistent, if a lot faster than traditional disks or even Flash based SSDs, but we address them in bytes, as we do memory like DRAM, if more slowly. Persistent memory (PM) lies between storage and memory in latency, bandwidth and cost, while providing memory semantics and storage persistence. In this webcast, SNIA experts will discuss:

    •Traditional uses of storage and memory as a cache
    •How can we build and use systems based on PM?
    •What would a system with storage, persistent memory and DRAM look like?
    •Do we need a new programming model to take advantage of PM?
    •Interesting use cases for systems equipped with PM
    •How we might take better advantage of this new technology
  • Kubernetes in the Cloud May 2 2019 6:00 pm UTC 75 mins
    Matt Baldwin, NetApp and Former Founder StackPoint Cloud; Ingo Fuchs, NetApp; Mike Jochimsen, Kaminario
    Kubernetes (k8s) is an open-source system for automating the deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Kubernetes promises simplified management of cloud workloads at scale, whether on-premises, hybrid, or in a public cloud infrastructure, allowing effortless movement of workloads from cloud to cloud. By some reckonings, it is being deployed at a rate several times faster than virtualization.

    In this presentation, we’ll introduce Kubernetes and present use cases that make clear where and why you would want to use it in your IT environment. We’ll also focus on the enterprise requirements of orchestration and containerization, and specifically on the storage aspects and best practices.

    •What is Kubernetes? Why would you want to use it?
    •How does Kubernetes help in a multi-cloud/private cloud environment?
    •How does Kubernetes orchestrate & manage storage? Can Kubernetes use Docker?
    •How do we provide persistence and data protection?
    •Example use cases
  • ESG Research: The Hybrid Cloud Tipping Point Apr 23 2019 5:00 pm UTC 75 mins
    Scott Sinclair, ESG; Michelle Tidwell, IBM, Mike Jochimsen, Kaminario; Eric Lakin, Univ. of Michigan; Alex McDonald, NetApp
    Has hybrid cloud reached a tipping point? According to research from the Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG), IT organizations today are struggling to strike the right balance between public cloud and their on-premises infrastructure. In this SNIA webcast, ESG senior analyst, Scott Sinclair, will share research on current cloud trends, covering:

    •Key drivers behind IT complexity
    •IT spending priorities
    •Multi-cloud & hybrid cloud adoption drivers
    •When businesses are moving workloads from the cloud back on-premises
    •Top security and cost challenges
    •Future cloud projections

    The research will be followed by a panel discussion with Scott Sinclair and SNIA cloud experts Alex McDonald, Michelle Tidwell, Mike Jochimsen and Eric Lakin.
  • Transactional Models and their Storage Requirements Recorded: Apr 9 2019 58 mins
    Alex McDonald, Vice-Chair SNIA Europe, and Office of the CTO, NetApp; Paul Talbut, SNIA Europe General Manager
    We’re all accustomed to transferring money from one bank account to another; a credit to the payer becomes a debit to the payee. But that model uses a specific set of sophisticated techniques to accomplish what appears to be a simple transaction. We’re also aware of how today we can order goods online, or reserve an airline seat over the Internet. Or even simpler, we can update a photograph on Facebook. Can these applications use the same models, or are new techniques required?

    One of the more important concepts in storage is the notion of transactions, which are used in databases, financials, and other mission critical workloads. However, in the age of cloud and distributed systems, we need to update our thinking about what constitutes a transaction. We need to understand how new theories and techniques allow us to undertake transactional work in the face of unreliable and physically dispersed systems. It’s a topic full of interesting concepts (and lots of acronyms!). In this webcast, we’ll provide a brief tour of traditional transactional systems and their use of storage, we’ll explain new application techniques and transaction models, and we’ll discuss what storage systems need to look like to support these new advances.

    And yes, we’ll explain all the acronyms and nomenclature too.

    You will learn:

    • A brief history of transactional systems from banking to Facebook
    • How the Internet and distributed systems have changed and how we view transactions
    • An explanation of the terminology, from ACID to CAP and beyond
    • How applications, networks & particularly storage have changed to meet these demands
  • Trends in Worldwide Media and Entertainment Storage Recorded: Mar 27 2019 56 mins
    Alex McDonald, SNIA SSSI Co-Chair (Moderator), Tom Coughlin, Coughlin Associates, Motti Beck, Mellanox Technologies
    Join SNIA Solid State Storage Initiative (SSSI) Education Chair and leading analyst Tom Coughlin and SSSI member Motti Beck of Mellanox Technologies for a journey into the requirements and trends in worldwide data storage for entertainment content acquisition, editing, archiving, and digital preservation. This webcast will cover capacity and performance trends and media projections for direct attached storage, cloud, and near-line network storage. It will also include results from a long-running digital storage survey of media and entertainment professionals. Learn what is needed for digital cinema, broadcast, cable, and internet applications and more.
  • The Scale-Out File System Architecture Overview Recorded: Feb 28 2019 69 mins
    Zhiqi Tao, Intel; John Kim, Mellanox
    This webcast will present an overview of scale-out file system architectures. To meet the increasingly higher demand on both capacity and performance in large cluster computing environments, the storage subsystem has evolved toward a modular and scalable design. The scale-out file system is one implementation of the trend, in addition to scale-out object and block storage solutions. This presentation will provide an introduction to scale-out-file systems and cover:

    •General principles when architecting a scale-out file system storage solution
    •Hardware and software design considerations for different workloads
    •Storage challenges when serving a large number of compute nodes, e.g. name space consistency, distributed locking, data replication, etc.
    •Use cases for scale-out file systems
    •Common benchmark and performance analysis approaches

    After you watch the webcast, check-out the Q&A blog at http://bit.ly/2EWqXQO
  • SNIA Swordfish™ Swims in Open Waters Recorded: Feb 27 2019 47 mins
    Don Deel, NetApp, SNIA; Moderated by Richelle Ahlvers, Broadcom, SNIA
    Tools for speeding your implementation of the next-generation storage management standard

    The SNIA Swordfish™ specification for the management of storage systems and data services is an extension of the DMTF Redfish® specification. Together, these specifications provide a unified approach for the management of servers and storage in converged, hyper-converged, hyperscale and cloud infrastructure environments.

    To help speed your Swordfish development efforts, SNIA has produced open source storage management tools available now on GitHub for your use. Join this session for an overview of these open source tools, which include a Swordfish API Emulator, a Swordfish Basic Web Client, an example Swordfish plugin for the Microsoft Power BI business analytics service, and an example Swordfish plugin for the Datadog monitoring service.
  • What’s New in Container Storage Recorded: Feb 26 2019 38 mins
    Keith Hudgins, Docker; Alex McDonald, NetApp
    Containers are a big trend in application deployment. The landscape of containers is moving fast and constantly changing, with new standards emerging every few months. Learn what’s new, what to pay attention to, and how to make sense of the ever-shifting container landscape.

    This live webcast will cover:
    •Container storage types and Container Frameworks
    •An overview of the various storage APIs for the container landscape
    •How to identify the most important projects to follow in the container world
    •The Container Storage Interface spec and Kubernetes 1.13
    •How to get involved in the container community

    After you watch the webcast, check out the Q&A blog at http://bit.ly/2GPkFET
  • Why Composable Infrastructure? Recorded: Feb 13 2019 60 mins
    Philip Kufeldt, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz; Mike Jochimsen, Kaminario; Alex McDonald, NetApp
    Cloud data centers are by definition very dynamic. The need for infrastructure availability in the right place at the right time for the right use case is not as predictable, nor as static, as it has been in traditional data centers. These cloud data centers need to rapidly construct virtual pools of compute, network and storage based on the needs of particular customers or applications, then have those resources dynamically and automatically flex as needs change. To accomplish this, many in the industry espouse composable infrastructure capabilities, which rely on heterogeneous resources with specific capabilities which can be discovered, managed, and automatically provisioned and re-provisioned through data center orchestration tools. The primary benefit of composable infrastructure results in a smaller grained sets of resources that are independently scalable and can be brought together as required. In this webcast, SNIA experts will discuss:

    •What prompted the development of composable infrastructure?
    •What are the solutions?
    •What is composable infrastructure?
    •Enabling technologies (not just what’s here, but what’s needed…)
    •Status of composable infrastructure standards/products
    •What’s on the horizon – 2 years? 5 Years
    •What it all means

    After you watch the webcast, check-out the Q&A blog bit.ly/2EOcAy8
  • Networking Requirements for Hyperconvergence Recorded: Feb 5 2019 61 mins
    Christine McMonigal, Intel; J Metz, Cisco; Alex McDonald, NetApp
    “Why can’t I add a 33rd node?”

    One of the great advantages of Hyperconvergence infrastructures (also known as “HCI”) is that, relatively speaking, they are extremely easy to set up and manage. In many ways, they’re the “Happy Meals” of infrastructure, because you have compute and storage in the same box. All you need to do is add networking.

    In practice, though, many consumers of HCI have found that the “add networking” part isn’t quite as much of a no-brainer as they thought it would be. Because HCI hides a great deal of the “back end” communication, it’s possible to severely underestimate the requirements necessary to run a seamless environment. At some point, “just add more nodes” becomes a more difficult proposition.

    In this webinar, we’re going to take a look behind the scenes, peek behind the GUI, so to speak. We’ll be talking about what goes on back there, and shine the light behind the bezels to see:

    •The impact of metadata on the network
    •What happens as we add additional nodes
    •How to right-size the network for growth
    •Tricks of the trade from the networking perspective to make your HCI work better
    •And more…

    Now, not all HCI environments are created equal, so we’ll say in advance that your mileage will necessarily vary. However, understanding some basic concepts of how storage networking impacts HCI performance may be particularly useful when planning your HCI environment, or contemplating whether or not it is appropriate for your situation in the first place.

    After you watch the webcast, check out the Q&A blog at http://bit.ly/2Va4wwH
  • File vs. Block vs. Object Storage Recorded: Feb 5 2019 66 mins
    Alex McDonald, Vice-Chair SNIA Europe and NetApp
    When it comes to storage, a byte is a byte is a byte, isn’t it? One of the enduring truths about simplicity is that scale makes everything hard, and with that comes complexity. And when we’re not processing the data, how do we store it and access it?

    In this webcast, we will compare three types of data access: file, block and object storage, and the access methods that support them. Each has its own set of use cases, and advantages and disadvantages. Each provides simple to sophisticated management of the data, and each makes different demands on storage devices and programming technologies.

    Perhaps you’re comfortable with block and file, but are interested in investigating the more recent class of object storage and access. Perhaps you’re happy with your understanding of objects, but would really like to understand files a bit better, and what advantages or disadvantages they have compared to each other. Or perhaps you want to understand how file, block and object are implemented on the underlying storage systems – and how one can be made to look like the other, depending on how the storage is accessed. Join us as we discuss and debate:

    Storage devices
    •How different types of storage drive different management & access solutions

    Block
    •Where everything is in fixed-size chunks
    •SCSI and SCSI-based protocols, and how FC and iSCSI fit in

    Files
    •When everything is a stream of bytes
    •NFS and SMB

    Objects
    •When everything is a blob
    •HTTP, key value and RESTful interfaces

    Altogether
    •When files, blocks and objects collide
  • What NVMe™/TCP Means for Networked Storage Recorded: Jan 22 2019 63 mins
    Sagi Grimberg, Lightbits; J Metz, Cisco; Tom Reu, Chelsio
    In the storage world, NVMe™ is arguably the hottest thing going right now. Go to any storage conference – either vendor- or vendor-neutral, and you’ll see NVMe as the latest and greatest innovation. It stands to reason, then, that when you want to run NVMe over a network, you need to understand NVMe over Fabrics (NVMe-oF).

    TCP – the long-standing mainstay of networking – is the newest transport technology to be approved by the NVM Express organization. This can mean really good things for storage and storage networking – but what are the tradeoffs?

    In this webinar, the lead author of the NVMe/TCP specification, Sagi Grimberg, and J Metz, member of the SNIA and NVMe Boards of Directors, will discuss:
    •What is NVMe/TCP
    •How NVMe/TCP works
    •What are the trade-offs?
    •What should network administrators know?
    •What kind of expectations are realistic?
    •What technologies can make NVMe/TCP work better?
    •And more…

    After the webcast, check out the Q&A blog http://sniaesfblog.org/author-of-nvme-tcp-spec-answers-your-questions/
  • Virtualization and Storage Networking Best Practices Recorded: Jan 17 2019 65 mins
    Cody Hosterman, Pure Storage; Jason Massae, VMware; J Metz, Cisco
    With all the different storage arrays and connectivity protocols available today, knowing the best practices can help improve operational efficiency and ensure resilient operations. VMware’s storage global service has reported many of the common service calls they receive. In this webcast, we will share those insights and lessons learned by discussing:
    - Common mistakes when setting up storage arrays
    - Why iSCSI is the number one storage configuration problem
    - Configuring adapters for iSCSI or iSER
    - How to verify your PSP matches your array requirements
    - NFS best practices
    - How to maximize the value of your array and virtualization
    - Troubleshooting recommendations

    After you watch the webcast, check out the Q&A blog at http://bit.ly/2WjmFJW
  • Applications Take Advantage of Persistent Memory Recorded: Jan 15 2019 60 mins
    Raghu Kulkarni, SNIA PM & NVDIMM SIG member and Alex McDonald, SNIA SSSI Co-Chair
    Kick off the new year with a new SNIA Persistent Memory and NVDIMM Special Interest Group webcast on how applications can take advantage of Persistent Memory today with NVDIMM - the go-to Persistent Memory technology for boosting performance for next generation storage platforms. NVDIMM standards have paved the way to simple, plug-n-play solutions. If you're a developer or integrator who hasn't yet realized the benefits of NVDIMMs in your products, you will want to attend to learn about NVDIMM functionality, applications, and benefits. You'll come away with an understanding of how NVDIMMs fit into the persistent memory landscape.
  • Emerging Memory Poised to Explode Recorded: Dec 11 2018 58 mins
    Moderator: Alex McDonald, SNIA SSSI Co-Chair; Presenters: Tom Coughlin, Coughlin Associates & Jim Handy, Objective Analysis
    Join SSSI members and respected analysts Tom Coughlin and Jim Handy for a look into their new Emerging Memory and Storage Technologies Report. Tom and Jim will examine emerging memory technologies and their interaction with standard memories, how a new memory layer improves computer performance, and the technical advantages and economies of scale that contribute to the enthusiasm for emerging memories. They will provide an outlook on market projections and enabling and driving applications. The webcast is the perfect preparation for the 2019 SNIA Persistent Memory Summit January 24, 2019.
  • Take the Leap to SNIA’s Storage Management Initiative Specification 1.8 Recorded: Dec 5 2018 36 mins
    Mike Walker, former Chair SNIA SMI TWG and former IBM Engineer, Don Deel, SNIA SMI Board Chair, SMI TWG Chair, NetApp
    If you’re a storage equipment vendor, management software vendor or end-user of the ISO approved SNIA Storage Management Initiative Specification (SMI-S), you won’t want to miss this presentation. Enterprise storage industry expert Mike Walker will provide an overview of new indications, methods, properties and profiles of SMI-S 1.7 and the newly introduced version, SMI-S 1.8. If you haven’t yet made the jump to SMI-S 1.7, Walker will explain why it’s important to go directly to SMI-S 1.8.
  • Introduction to SNIA Swordfish™ ─ Scalable Storage Management Recorded: Dec 4 2018 39 mins
    Daniel Sazbon, SNIA Europe Chair, IBM; Alex McDonald, SNIA Europe Vice Chair, NetApp
    The SNIA Swordfish™ specification helps to provide a unified approach for the management of storage and servers in hyperscale and cloud infrastructure environments, making it easier for IT administrators to integrate scalable solutions into their data centers. Swordfish builds on the Distributed Management Task Force’s (DMTF’s) Redfish® specification using the same easy-to-use RESTful methods and lightweight JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) formatting. Join this session to receive an overview of Swordfish including the new functionality added in version 1.0.6 released in March, 2018.
  • Networking Requirements for Ethernet Scale-Out Storage Recorded: Nov 14 2018 44 mins
    John Kim, Mellanox; Saqib Jang, Chelsio; Fred Zhang, Intel
    Scale-out storage is increasingly popular for cloud, high-performance computing, machine learning, and certain enterprise applications. It offers the ability to grow both capacity and performance at the same time and to distribute I/O workloads across multiple machines.

    But unlike traditional local or scale-up storage, scale-out storage imposes different and more intense workloads on the network. Clients often access multiple storage servers simultaneously; data typically replicates or migrates from one storage node to another; and metadata or management servers must stay in sync with each other as well as communicating with clients. Due to these demands, traditional network architectures and speeds may not work well for scale-out storage, especially when it’s based on flash. Join this webinar to learn:

    •Scale-out storage solutions and what workloads they can address
    •How your network may need to evolve to support scale-out storage
    •Network considerations to ensure performance for demanding workloads
    •Key considerations for all flash

    After you watch the webcast, check out the Q&A blog: http://bit.ly/scale-out-q-a
  • Create a Smarter and More Economic Cloud Storage Architecture Recorded: Nov 7 2018 55 mins
    Michelle Tidwell, IBM; Eric Lakin, University of Michigan; Mike Jochimsen, Kaminario; Alex McDonald, NetApp
    Building a cloud storage architecture requires both storage vendors, cloud service providers and large enterprises to consider new technical and economic paradigms in order to enable a flexible and cost efficient architecture.

    Economic:
    Cloud infrastructure is often procured by service providers and large enterprises in the traditional way – prepay for expected future storage needs and over provision for unexpected changes in demand. This requires large capital expenditures with slow cost recovery based on fluctuating customer adoption. Giving these cloud service providers flexibility in the procurement model for their storage allows them to more closely align the expenditure on infrastructure resources with the cost recovery from customers, optimizing the use of both CapEx and OpEx budgets.

    Technical:
    Clouds inherently require often unpredictable scalability – both up and down. Building a storage architecture with the ability to rapidly allocate resources for a specific customer need and reallocate resources based on changing customer requirements allows the cloud service provider to optimize storage capacity and performance pools in their data center without compromising the responsiveness to the change in needs. Such architecture should also align to the datacenter level orchestration system to allow for even higher level of resource optimization and flexibility.

    In this webcast, you will learn:
    •How modern storage technology allows you to build this infrastructure
    •The role of software defined storage
    •Accounting principles
    •How to model cloud costs of new applications and or re-engineering existing applications
    •Performance considerations
SNIA
The Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA) is a non-profit organization made up of member companies spanning information technology. A globally recognized and trusted authority, SNIA’s mission is to lead the storage industry in developing and promoting vendor-neutral architectures, standards and educational services that facilitate the efficient management, movement and security of information.

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  • Title: Storage Performance Benchmarking: Workloads
  • Live at: Feb 14 2018 6:00 pm
  • Presented by: Mark Rogov, Dell EMC, Chris Conniff, Dell EMC, Tim Lustig, Mellanox
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