Networking Requirements for Hyperconvergence

Presented by

Christine McMonigal, Intel; J Metz, Cisco; Alex McDonald, NetApp

About this talk

“Why can’t I add a 33rd node?” One of the great advantages of Hyperconvergence infrastructures (also known as “HCI”) is that, relatively speaking, they are extremely easy to set up and manage. In many ways, they’re the “Happy Meals” of infrastructure, because you have compute and storage in the same box. All you need to do is add networking. In practice, though, many consumers of HCI have found that the “add networking” part isn’t quite as much of a no-brainer as they thought it would be. Because HCI hides a great deal of the “back end” communication, it’s possible to severely underestimate the requirements necessary to run a seamless environment. At some point, “just add more nodes” becomes a more difficult proposition. In this webinar, we’re going to take a look behind the scenes, peek behind the GUI, so to speak. We’ll be talking about what goes on back there, and shine the light behind the bezels to see: •The impact of metadata on the network •What happens as we add additional nodes •How to right-size the network for growth •Tricks of the trade from the networking perspective to make your HCI work better •And more… Now, not all HCI environments are created equal, so we’ll say in advance that your mileage will necessarily vary. However, understanding some basic concepts of how storage networking impacts HCI performance may be particularly useful when planning your HCI environment, or contemplating whether or not it is appropriate for your situation in the first place. After you watch the webcast, check out the Q&A blog at http://bit.ly/2Va4wwH

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