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Emission standards and control of PM2.5 from coal-fired power plant

It is a concern that emissions from coal combustion may pollute the air. A lot of effort has been made to
regulate, control and prevent the pollutants emitted from coal-fired power plants. The coal industry is
facing increasingly stringent emission regulations, for the release of SO2, NOx, toxic volatile organic
compounds, heavy metals, and particulate matter (PM). PM can contain any or all of the aforementioned
chemical species or their compounds, plus water and biogenic organic species. PM2.5, as fine PM, can be
inhaled into human respiratory systems and travel deep into the lungs causing health problems. PM2.5 is
also considered to be a major cause of smog in cities and elsewhere. This webinar describes the
international and selected countries’ national air quality and PM emission standards for stationary
sources that are relevant to coal-fired power plants. Emission standards for SO2 and NOx are included
since they are precursors of secondary fine PM. International and national measurement standards are
summarised. Recent developments in PM emission control technologies are reviewed.
Recorded May 18 2016 46 mins
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Presented by
Xing Zhang
Presentation preview: Emission standards and control of PM2.5 from coal-fired power plant

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IEA Clean Coal Centre
IEA Clean Coal Centre

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