Cofiring high ratios of biomass with coal

Manage webcast
Dr Rohan Fernando
Dr Rohan Fernando presents the findings of his latest report on biomass
May 9 2012
28 mins
Cofiring high ratios of biomass with coal
cofiring biomass coal
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Energy

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  • The course will explain the principles, process and value of power performance verification. From turbine supply contract negotiation through completion of power performance verification, there are many opportunities to reduce the risk associated with wind turbine performance. Trends will be presented and guidance provided for what to expect at all stages including:

    - Contract negotiation
    - Site evaluation
    - Measurement system design
    - Data processing and interpretation – including case studies
    - Documentation of results

    On completion, delegates should understand the value of power performance verification, how the process works and how to minimize the risk. Specifically: how to set the stage during contract negotiation for a successful campaign; what factors most influence the wind speed measurement and how to design for the lowest uncertainty; how the results can be interpreted and leveraged.
  • Organisations across all sectors are dealing with a growing array of third party/vendor relationships. Even obscure supplier relationships can have significant impact on security, risk and compliance. The Target credit card breach is one example in which a heating and air conditioning supplier was the doorway in to a significant breach of a point of sale system and theft of credit card data. Organisations have to manage risk across their third party supplier relationships but are limited in the resources they can devote to this.

    This 'Expert' webinar will address the following:-

    o Understand the growing array of third party relationships
    o The impact of third party relationships on security, risk and compliance
    o Elements of an effective, efficient, and agile vendor risk management process
    o How other areas of the organisation can leverage a common approach to third party risk management

    Attend this webinar if:-

    o You are concerned by the growing number of third party supplier relationships
    o You realise your risk and compliance exposure is growing because of these relationships
    o You need to be able to manage supplier risk but cannot recruit more staff to do so
    o You desire the need to know how to keep current in a dynamic environment of third party relationships
  • The term Smart City is gaining momentum the world over, but does that mean that cities are becoming “smarter” or just looking to improve their image? What does it truly mean to be a “smart” city? And is it resonating with their residents, businesses and visitors? This briefing will look into how the smallest changes approaching city services can have a big impact on everything from security to energy and traffic to urban revitalization

    Reasons to Attend:

    - To understand key challenges cities are facing in the face of issues such as urbanization, environmental responses and new technologies
    - To examine new ways cities are integrating smarter solutions to address seemingly unrelated services, for better quality of life and a higher tax base
    - To explore how suppliers can provide comprehensive solutions to such a fragmented market
  • Connected homes are prime examples of innovative applications of technology meant to enable enriched lifestyle experiences for consumers. However, allowing third parties an open access to home networks to deliver these experiences exposes both the consumer and service providers to the potential vulnerabilities of cyberspace. It is critical to understand that cyber threats require collective responsibility and accountability sharing from all stakeholders involved.

    This briefing will deliberate upon the issue of cybersecurity as it pertains to the connected home environment. An expert panel comprising members of Frost & Sullivan, connected home technology leaders, and a consumer privacy advocate will provide advice and opinions with regard to addressing this disruptive trend. Industry participants will learn how to address the issue of cyber breach and maintain continued interest in living the connected experience.
  • Rejoignez CODA Stratégies, Catalent Pharma Solutions et Schneider Electric à 14h le jeudi 2 juillet, afin de découvrir les dernières tendances majeures du management de l’énergie et comment la gestion des données transforme le paysage de la performance énergétique.

    Jean-Claude Migette, Président de CODA Stratégies, présentera les conclusions des dernières études menées sur le management de l’énergie:

    • Etat des lieux quantitatif et qualitatif du marché des services énergétiques français
    • Analyse des évolutions récentes de ce marché et de ses derniers développements
    • Retour sur les principaux facteurs de succès et des barrières restantes.

    Benjamin Bruet, Business Development manager, Schneider Electric présentera:

    • Les bénéfices de l’intégration dans une plate-forme unique des données énergétiques et environnementales
    • Les meilleures pratiques en matière de collecte et d’agrégation des données
    • Comment capitaliser sur ces données pour en faire un levier d’accélération de votre performance
  • Attend this webinar to discover:

    - What factors are forcing change on power utilities businesses?
    - Which regions are most at risk or undergoing the most rapid transformations?
    - How are the most affected power utilities dealing with these threats?
    - What are possible future business models for power utilities to retain strong market positions?
  • Attend this webinar to discover:

    - What factors are forcing change on power utilities businesses?
    - Which regions are most at risk or undergoing the most rapid transformations?
    - How are the most affected power utilities dealing with these threats?
    - What are possible future business models for power utilities to retain strong market positions?
  • System Center Configuration Manager is the solution of choice for managing today's enterprise environments. But what’s an administrator to do when a security audit includes vulnerabilities in non-Microsoft applications and server platforms?

    Introducing the only enterprise-class 3rd party patching solutions designed exclusively for System Center environments that require operationally efficient and reliable security and compliance patching solutions.

    Join us for a discussion of practical methods to improve and automate the patch process for your most targeted 3rd party desktop applications and non-Windows server platforms, reduce the time you spend building updates, and improve audit readiness in your Windows environment.
  • Join Verdantix and Schneider Electric at 11AM EDT, 4PM BST on Monday, June 22nd, as we discuss strategies to solve enterprise energy and sustainability data management challenges.

    Webinar Overview

    Alisdair McDougall from Verdantix will discuss his research on energy and sustainability business issues and market opportunities:

    - Why Big Energy Data is useless without actionable game plans
    - Why 9 out of 10 sustainability leaders admit their firms need to improve energy performance
    - Why data management should be item #1 on energy and sustainability agendas
    - How many sustainability leaders intend to report on supply chain sustainability performance in 2015

    Schneider Electric will present:

    - Benefits of integrating energy and sustainability data
    - Best practices in acquiring disparate data streams
    - Making decisions and driving action through an enterprise energy and sustainability solution
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  • Operating experience of low grade fuels in circulating fluidised bed combustion Aug 19 2015 11:00 am UTC 45 mins
    Dr Ian Barnes
    Recent developments in process waste recycling and biomass utilisation have driven the use of these so-called ‘low value fuels’ for energy generation on a stand-alone basis, and in combination with coal. One particular technology stands out as being particularly well suited to utilising these low value fuels, circulating fluidised bed combustion (CFBC). The upcoming webinar sets out examples of the range of low value fuels, their reserves and properties, with particular emphasis on coal-derived materials, the issues for CFB plant in utilising these fuels and selected examples of manufacturer and operator experience with purpose built, or modified CFB plant.
  • Prospects for clean coal technologies in Italy Recorded: Jul 22 2015 38 mins
    Dr Stephen Mills
    Dr Steve Mills presents his recent researxh
  • Enhanced coal bed methane recovery Recorded: Jun 10 2015 25 mins
    Dr Lesley Sloss
    Dr Lesley Sloss presents her latest research
  • Advanced sensors and smart control systems for coal-fired power plants Recorded: May 13 2015 26 mins
    Toby Lockwood
    Coal power plant control systems have progressively evolved to meet the growing demand for efficient and flexible power generation whilst maintaining low emissions. In particular, optimisation of the combustion process has required increased use of online monitoring technologies and the replacement of standard control loops with more advanced algorithms
    capable of handling multivariable systems. Improved stoichiometric control can be achieved with
    coal and air flow sensors or imaging and spectral analysis of the flame itself, whilst in-situ laser absorption spectroscopy provides a means of mapping CO and O2 distribution in hot regions of the furnace. Modern plant control systems are able to draw on a range of computational
    techniques to determine the appropriate control response, including artificial intelligence which
    mimics the actions of expert operators and complex empirical models built from operational data.
    New sensor technologies are also being researched to further improve control and to withstand the high temperature and corrosive environments of advanced coal plant and gasifiers. Increased use of optical technologies is of particular interest, with sensors based on optical fibres able to perform low noise, highly sensitive, and distributed measurements at high temperatures.
    Microelectronic fabrication techniques and newly developed high temperature materials are also being combined to develop miniaturised devices which provide a robust and low cost solution for in-situ monitoring of gases and other parameters. These new sensors can be integrated with wireless communication technology and self-powering systems to facilitate the deployment of distributed sensor networks and monitoring of inaccessible locations. Using principles of self-organisation to optimise their output, such networks may play a growing role in future control systems.
  • Microalgal removal of CO2 from flue gas Recorded: Apr 22 2015 39 mins
    Xing Zhang
    Microalgal removal of CO2 from flue gas
    Various methods have been developed to remove CO2 from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Biological post-combustion capture is one of these. Microalgae may be used for bio-fixation of CO2 because of their capacity for photosynthesis and rapid growth. The ability of microalgae to withstand the high concentrations of CO2 in flue gas, as well as the potentially toxic accompanying SOx and NOx has been researched. Microalgal strains that are particularly suitable for this application have been isolated. Most of the research on algal bio-fixation has been concerned with carbon fixation strategies, photobioreactor designs, conversion technology from microalgal biomass to bioenergy, and economic evaluations of microalgal energy. This webinar considers current progress in algal technology and product utilisation, together with an analysis of the advantages and challenges of the technologies. It opens with a brief introduction to the theory of algal bio-fixation and factors that influence its efficiency especially in terms of flue gas characteristics, and then discusses culturing, processing technologies and the applications of bio-fixation by-products. Current algae-based CO2 capture demonstration projects at coal-fired power stations around the world are described.
  • Coal and gas competition in power generation in Asia Recorded: Mar 18 2015 43 mins
    Dr Nigel Dong
    Competition between coal and natural gas for power generation has been observed to occur in North America and Europe in recent years, where the costs of the two fuels have played a key role in determining the relative competitiveness. It is perceived that such a competition could also happen in Asian countries. More importantly, as these countries are expanding their generation capacity to meet growing electricity demand, a key question is raised of whether coal or gas power plants should be built with priority. This webinar is based on a recent report published by IEA CCC, where the authors investigate nine Asian countries to seek to understand the mechanisms that drive the competition between coal and gas for power generation.
  • Global forest resource for power generation fuels Recorded: Jan 21 2015 28 mins
    Paul Baruya
    Biomass could have an important role in the strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from large coal plants. Amongst the plethora of different biomasses, wood pellets have emerged as one of the most successful and fast growing internationally traded commodities. Wood (and straw) pellets offer a more energy dense and transportable alternative to the traditional wood chip, a product most commonly associated with the paper and pulp industry.

    A few large scale projects in Europe have drawn on North American sources to supplement local supplies of biomass without any major problems. At current levels of demand, there appears to be an abundance of wood resource.
    However, extending cofiring at low rates (5-10%) to the world’s coal-fired fleet will increase demand for wood pellets significantly. Meeting this demand will offer opportunities and challenges for the entire biomass supply chain, not least forest resources. This presentation accompanies a report by the IEA Clean Coal Centre to review the current understanding of world biomass resources using published forestry data from the UN Forestry and Agricultural Organization (FAO). From these data, the author attempts to identify a global and regional resource figure for wood in the form of residues and waste by-products that arise from the forestry industry; and discusses the broad issues that affect forest resources worldwide.
  • Outlook for environmental equipment under new mercury emission regulations Recorded: Dec 17 2014 37 mins
    Dr Lesley Sloss
    Legislation for mercury control for coal-fired power plants is emerging in several regions. The US
    Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has several new rules, including MATS (the Mercury
    and Air Toxics Standard) and CSAPR (the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule) both of which will have
    a significant impact on coal-fired power plants in terms of retrofitting control technologies for
    compliance. Canada has the Canada-Wide Standard which sets caps on mercury emissions for
    individual Provinces. Although the EU has not yet set emission limits for mercury from coal-fired
    plants, the new IED (Industrial Emissions Directive) has annual monitoring requirements for
    mercury emissions. Further, the new BREFs (best available technology reference documents)
    include details on options for mercury control. This would imply that, although mercury is not
    currently being regulated, emissions are being monitored and control may be required at some
    sources in future. China's latest Five-Year Plan includes emission limits for mercury which, for
    the moment, are not particularly challenging. However, there is clearly a recent and significant
    move in China towards the cleaning up of emissions from the coal sector.
    In addition to mercury-specific policies and approaches, these regions have other policies and
    regulations which could have a significant effect on mercury emissions. Looking ahead, based on
    the consideration that regulations will be enacted for several pollutants simultaneously in these
    regions, the outlook for environmental equipment regulations with respect to trace element
    emissions is investigated. The webinar covers:
    • legislative approaches in the different regions;
    • suitable control technologies - co-benefit approaches, mercury specific technologies and
    multi-pollutant strategies; and
    • summaries of action in each of the target regions.
  • The Direct Injection Carbon Engine (DICE) Recorded: Oct 8 2014 24 mins
    Kyle Nicol
    Using coal to fuel diesel engines has been investigated previously, but the technology has not yet been commercialised. This presentation reviews the previous R&D programmes on coal-fuelled diesel engines and focuses on the recent developments of the technology in its latest form, the direct injection carbon engine (DICE).
  • Pre-drying coal – technologies and economics Recorded: Sep 24 2014 32 mins
    Dr Nigel Dong
    Lignite is an important fuel for power generation in many parts of the world. The major issue is that the high moisture content of lignite results in low thermal efficiencies and high CO2 emissions of lignite-fired power plants. An effective way to resolve this issue is to pre-dry the lignite before combustion in the boiler. Several modern pre-drying processes, such as RWE’s WTA dryer and GRE’s DryFining™ systems, have been developed based on this principle, which can be integrated to lignite-fired power plants to continuously pre-dry the feeding run-of-mine lignite. This webinar describes those technologies and their technoeconomic implications for the lignite-fired power plants to which they are integrated. In addition, the webinar also introduces the development of some standalone lignite drying and upgrading technologies.
  • Increasing the flexibility of coal-fired power plants Recorded: Aug 6 2014 31 mins
    Dr Colin Henderson
    Coal-fired power plants are increasingly required to balance power grids by compensating for the variable electricity supply from renewable energy sources. For this, high flexibility is needed, in terms of possessing resilience to frequent start-ups, meeting major and rapid load changes, and providing frequency control duties. This report reviews the means available and under development for achieving the flexibility. Potential damage mechanisms are well known, and the necessary flexibility can be achieved with acceptable impacts on component life, efficiency and emissions. Designs are being developed to enable flexibility in future plants.
  • Blending of coals to meet power station requirements Recorded: Jul 16 2014 43 mins
    Dr Lesley Sloss
    Blending of imported and domestic coal is becoming more important. Until recently, coal blending in power stations was adopted mainly to reduce the cost of generation and increase the use of indigenous or more readily available coal. Low-grade (high ash) coal can be mixed with higher grade (imported) coal without deterioration in thermal performance of the boiler, thus reducing the cost of generation. As coal markets change, new reasons for coal blending are becoming apparent. As indigenous coals become less available, of lower quality or more expensive to mine in some regions, blending of imported coals becomes necessary. It can be challenging to ensure that the resulting blend will maintain plant output without damaging the boiler.
    In some cases coal blending is used as a form of pollution control, such as the combination of inexpensive high sulphur coals with more costly low sulphur coals to ensure compliance with sulphur emission limits. It is even possible to blend different coal types to maximise mercury emission reduction.
    Many methods of coal blending are used. Coals can be blended at the coal mine, at the preparation plant, trans-shipment point, or at the power station. The method selected depends upon the site conditions, the level of blending required, the quantity to be stored and blended, the accuracy required, and the end use of the blended coal. Normally in large power stations handling very large quantities of coal, the stacking method with a fully mechanised system is followed.
    In this webinar Lesley discusses the different reasons and priorities for coal blending. She summarises the methods of coal blending, from coal characterisation though to mixing and storage methods, including some case studies of challenging situations.
  • Prospects for coal and clean coal in Turkey Recorded: Jun 18 2014 36 mins
    Dr Stephen Mills
    Turkey has one of the world’s fastest growing economies. Rapid economic expansion, rising population, and growing industrialisation have triggered a general increase in energy demand. Over the next ten years energy demand is expected to double. In order to meet this, significant investment in the energy sector will be required.

    Turkey's indigenous energy resources are limited almost exclusively to lignite and smaller amounts of hard coal, so there is a heavy
    dependence on imported sources of energy. More than 90% of Turkey’s oil and 98% of its natural gas is imported, as is much of the hard coal consumed, as a considerable cost. The government aims to reduce this,
    partly through the greater use of domestic lignite, widely available in many parts of the country. Thus, the government has a ‘coal strategy’ and has introduced incentives to encourage the its greater utilisation. Many new power generation projects are in the pipeline, some fired on ligniteand others that will rely on imported hard coal.

    Many existing state-owned coal-fired power assets (and coalfields) are in the process of being transferred to the private sector. Some power plants require modernising and this is being factored into their selling price. The current coal-based generating fleet comprises plants based on conventional pulverised coal or fluidised bed combustion technology. Some newer projects plan to use supercritical steam conditions and all major power plants will be required to install effective emission control systems.

    The further development and application of a range of clean coal technologies is being pursued by a number of Turkish utilities, technology developers, and universities. There is increasing involvement
    with international projects and, in many cases, growing links with overseas counterparts.
  • Upgrading the efficiency of the world’s coal fleet to reduce CO2 emissions Recorded: May 14 2014 39 mins
    Dr Ian Barnes
    This study examines the role of HELE (high efficiency, low emission) coal-fired power plant in helping to meet the goal of reduced carbon dioxide emissions by setting out an overview of the prospects for the role of HELE technologies in a number of major coal user countries. Ten countries have been selected for study and are (in alphabetical order); Australia, China, Germany, India, Japan, Poland, Russia, South Africa, South Korea and the USA. The target countries have differing coal-plant fleet ages and efficiencies, and different local conditions and policies which impact on the scope for HELE implementation.
    The profile of the coal fleet for each country has been calculated to meet future electricity demand under three scenarios with progressively greater replacement of lower efficiency capacity with HELE technology, and the consequent emissions of carbon dioxide and costs of implementation determined. The results are discussed in terms of potential carbon dioxide savings and the prospects for adopting a HELE upgrade pathway in the context of current energy policy.
  • Developments in oxyfiring combustion Recorded: Apr 24 2014 40 mins
    Toby Lockwood and Kyle Nicol
    First Asia-Pacific webinar from the IEA CCC. Presented by Toby Lockwood and Kyle Nicol.
  • High temperature steels in pulverised coal technology Recorded: Mar 19 2014 27 mins
    Kyle Nicol
    Pulverised coal combustion (PCC) power plant with supercritical (SC) steam parameters have been operational for over forty years and ultra-supercrital (USC) PCC plant have been operational for just over twenty years. This significant amount of operating experience is valuable regarding the performance of high temperatures steels. For example 9-12% chromium martensitic steels have had problems with cracking and some have not been as strong as they were projected to be. Additionally, PCC power plant have been operated outside of design parameters, such as severe cyclic operation, which has resulted in unforeseen problems for high temperature steels. This webinar reviews the performance, problems, solutions and research efforts for high temperature steels used in SC and USC technology.
  • Sustainability of biomass for cofiring Recorded: Feb 12 2014 31 mins
    Debo Adams
    There are many items to include when considering the sustainability of biomass for cofiring, and some of them are hard to quantify. The focus of this webinar is on the greenhouse gas emission aspects of sustainability. The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions achieved by substituting biomass for coal depends on a number of factors such as the nature of the fossil fuel reference system, the source of the biomass, and how it is produced. Relevant issues in biomass production include the energy balance, the greenhouse gas balance, land use change, non-CO2 greenhouse gas emission from soils, changes to soil organic carbon, and the timing of emissions and removal of CO2 which relates to the scale of biomass production. Certification of sustainable biomass is slow to emerge at the national and international level, so various organisations are developing and using their own standards for sustainable production. The EU does not yet have sustainability standards for solid biomass, but the UK and Belgium have developed their own.
  • Challenges and opportunities for coal gasification in developing countries Recorded: Jan 8 2014 44 mins
    Dr Andrew Minchener
    Coal gasification for chemicals, gaseous and liquid fuels production can fulfil an important strategic need in those developing countries where coal is the primary fuel source and oil and gas energy security is an issue. At the same time, the establishment of major projects in such countries can be problematical for a number of technical and economic reasons, although it is encouraging that some projects appear to be moving forward. There are two developing countries where coal conversion projects to produce chemicals, gaseous and liquid fuels have been taken forward strongly. The first is South Africa, which established the world’s only commercial-scale coal-to-liquids and coal-tochemicals facilities at Secunda and Sasolburg respectively. The other is China, where there is a major gasification-based coal conversion development and deployment programme that is set to become a significant, large-scale commercial element in the nation’s energy development plans. This will provide further major opportunities for the deployment of large-scale coal gasification technologies, various syngas conversion units and catalysts for the subsequent production of the required products. The role of China is likely to be critical in the dissemination of such technologies to other developing countries as it can not only provide the technical expertise but also financially underpin such projects, including the associated infrastructure needs.
IEA Clean Coal Centre
IEA Clean Coal Centre

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  • Title: Cofiring high ratios of biomass with coal
  • Live at: May 9 2012 11:00 am
  • Presented by: Dr Rohan Fernando
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